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NO. 28 



MARCH 1985 



$3.00 



THE #1 MAGAZINE FOR ATARI® COMPUTER OWNERS 








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game. Flight Simulator II features include ■ animate^ color 3D graphics ■ day, dusk, and night flying mode 
■ over 80 airports in four scenery areas: New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Seattle, with additional scenery I 
areas available ■ user-variable weather, from clear blue skies to grey cloudy conditions ■ complete flight I 
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or write or call for more information. For direct orders enclose $49.95 plus $2.00 
for shipping and specify UPS or first class mail delivery. American Express, 
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NO. 28 



\ MARCH 1985 



THE #1 MAGAZINE FOR ATARI® COMPUTER OWNERS 




COMPUTING 






FEATURES 

Winter CES Report Lee Pappas and 

Arthur Leyenberger 

MicroDOS XL Walter D. Lord 

Monthly Mortgage Calculator Amy H. Krohn 

Demon Birds Dan Builok 

MicroCheck Part 2 Clayton Walnum 

TwoGun Conrad Tatge 

Cascade Neil Simms 

REVIEWS 

Field of Fire (S.S.I.) Patrick J. Kelley 

HomePak (Batteries Included) . . . .Arthur Leyenberger 

The Tax Advantage 
(Continental Software) Karl E. Wiegers 

Your Personal Net Worth 
(Scarborough Systems) Bob Curtin 

A Word Processing Trilogy: 
Homeword (Sierra On-Line), SuperText (Muse 
Software), The Writer's Tool (O.S.S.) Bob Curtin 

Smoothwriter (Digital Deli) Keith Valenza 

CityWriter (Software City) Arthur Leyenberger 

Cabin Fever Fantasies: 
Spelunker (Broderbund), Cutthroats (Infocom), 
Galactic Adventures (S.S.I. ), 
Quest of the Space Beagle (Avalon Hill), 
S.S. Achilles (Beyond Challenging) . . . .Steve Panak 



16 
26 
42 
49 
73 
80 



15 
29 

33 

37 

57 
65 



86 



COLUMNS 

Reader Comment 6 

New Products 9 

Griffin's Lair Braden E. Griffin, M.D. 11 

Unicheck 24 

Boot Camp Tom Hudson 68 

Index to Advertisers 92 

Reader Service 93 




■1 



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ANALOG COMPUTING 

STAFF 

Editors/Publishers 

MICHAEL J. DESCHENES 
LEE H. PAPPAS 

Managing Editor 

JON A. BELL 

Production Editor 

DIANE L, GAW 

Contributing Editors 

DONALD FORBES 
BRADEN GRIFFIN, M.D. 
TONY MESSINA 

East Coast Editor 

ARTHUR LEYENBERGER 

West Coast Editor 

JIM DUNION 

Art Director 

BOB DESI 

Contributing Artists 

GARY LIPPINCOTT 
LINDA RICE 

Technical Division 

CHARLES BACHAND 
TOM HUDSON 
KYLE PEACOCK 

Advertising Manager 

MICHAEL J. DESCHENES 

Distribution 

PATRICK J. KELLEY 

Production/Distribution 

LORELL PRESS, INC. 

Contributors 

DAN BULLOK 
BOB CURTIN 
AMY H. KROHN 
WALTER D. LORD 
STEVE PANAK 
NEIL SIMMS 
CONRAD TATGE 
KEITH VALENZA 
CLAYTON WALNUM 
KARL E. WIEGERS 



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Corp.) i.s in no way affiliated 
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ANALOG Computing 

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ANALOG Computing (ISSN 0744-9917) is published monthly for $28 per year by 
ANALOG 400/800 Corp., 565 Main Street, Cherry Valley, MA 01611, Tel. (617) 
892-3488. Second-class postage paid at Worcester, MA and additional mailing of- 
fices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ANALOG Computing, P.O. Box 
615, Holmes, PA 19043. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in any form 
without written permission of the publisher. Program listings should be provided in 
printed form. Articles should be furnished as typed copy in upper and lower case with 
double spacing. By submitting articles to ANALOG Computing, authors acknowledge 
that such materials, upon acceptance for publication, become the exclusive property 
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Contents copyright © 1984 ANALOG 400/800 Corp. 



PAGE 4 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 




The 



New Atari 
Computers: 

Power 

without the Price 



l^'tMKV 



1 I I » * * . i I » * * . \ 



\ I 



\' ^-^ . 



The Atari 130ST, 
a 16-bit, 68000-based computer. 



by Arthur Leyenberger 



It has been over seven months since Jack Tramiel 
and clan took over the company that we're all so fond 
of. Almost complete secrecy surrounded what Jack, 
his three sons and a host of ex-Commodore execu- 
tives had been planning. No doubt, the lack of any 
information was frustrating for the loyal Atari user. 

In case you've just returned from intergalactic travel 
or have been otherwise unaware of the ongoing Atari 
news, here is a short review of the events leading up 
to the most significant Atari announcement since the 
400/800 computers were first introduced in 1979. For 
those of you who have been following these events, 
please bear with me — the news is worth waiting an 
extra paragraph or two. 

A brief history. 

Shortly after the June CES, founder/former head of 
Commodore International Corporation, Jack Tramiel, 
bought Atari from Warner Communications. In the 
deal, Warner virtually gave away the current inven- 
tory and became partners with their ex-rival. If Atari 
did well, so would Warner Communications. 

The only news that was issued by Atari at the time 



was that Jack Tramiel would make Atari financially 
solvent — and the number one computer company (for 
low end machines?— Ed.) by the end of 1985. Some 
vague references to being in the computer business, 
not the game business, were also mentioned. 

Atari's introduction of their new line of computers 
and peripherals at the Winter CES in Las Vegas was 
the first product news to be released by the company. 
As you'll see, it's been well worth the wait. 

The new computers. 

Two computer lines were unveiled by Atari in Las 
Vegas. The XE series is basically the next "XL' gener- 
ation of machines. They're reported to be complete- 
ly compatible with existing hardware and software, 
and have been totally redesigned. 

The ST (designating Sixteen/Thirty-two bit) line 
is what most of us have been waiting for. A 16 -bit 
Motorola MC68000 microprocessor drives the two 
computers in the series. These two machines use Digi- 
tal Research's Graphics Environment Manager (GEM), 
which allows a powerful, easy-to-use, interface like 
that of the Apple Macintosh to be the computer's 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 5 




"front end." The ST "Jackintosh" machines are pack- 
aged in low profile, sleek-looking cases, similar to the 
Apple lie and the new Commodore 128 computers. 

XE series. 

The new 65XE computer is the replacement for the 
800XL. It contains 65.5 bytes of RAM, 11 graphics 
modes, 256 colors, 4 independent sound voices and 
built-in BASIC. The 65XEM computer is a 65XE with 
the addition of 8 independent voices and changeable 
music features. This "music machine" allows the user 
to control such features as sound duration, pitch, fre- 
quency, envelope and attack/decay attributes. 

The 65XEP is Atari's portable computer. It has a 
built-in 5 -inch monochrome monitor capable of 
displaying 40 columns of text, a built-in 3V2-inch 
disk drive, 64K bytes of RAM and a shoulder 
strap. The 65XEP is not really a portable, in 
the sense that it more resembles a small 
Kaypro, Compaq or other box-like, "lug 
gable" machine, rather than a true port- 
able, such as the Radio Shack Model 
100 or Epson PX-7. 

The fourth XE computer is the 
XE130, a 128K version of the 
65XE. The XE computers are 
priced as follows: 65XE - 
under $120; 65XEM- un- 
der $200; 65XEP - un- 
der $400; and 130XE - under $200. The 65XE and 
130XE computers have the cartridge slot in the back 
of the machine. At press time, it was not known if 
the parallel bus (like that on the 600 and 800XLs) 
would be included on the 8-bit machines. Only two 
joystick ports are to be found on the machines. They 
are attractively styled in an off-white, low profile de- 
sign. 

The Atari 130XE computer also has a MIDI music 
interface. MIDI stands for Musical Instrument Digi- 
tal Interface and is a hardware/software interface for 
I/O control of musical instruments. It allows digital 
data communication between a computer acting as 
a controller and a musical instrument, such as a syn- 
thesizer. 

In addition to the new XE computers, Atari also 
announced new monitors, printers, modems and disk 
drives. Peripherals for the XE family are 100 percent 
compatible with the 400, 800, 600XL, 800XL and 
1200XL computers. According to Sam Tramiel, Presi- 
dent, "Atari Corp. is fully committed to supplying the 
consumer with powerful and quality peripherals at 
rock bottom prices." 

The XE peripherals consist of the following: XTM 
201 - dot matrix, non-impact, 20 -character/second 
(cps) printer, under $100; XTC 201 - dot matrix, color 
20-cps printer, under $100; XMM 801 - dot matrix, 
80-cps impact printer, under $200; and XDM 121 - 
12-cps daisy wheel, letter quality printer, similar to 
the Silver-Reed 400, under $200. Currently, the 1050 



disk drive is still available, but it will be repackaged 
into a color-matched, low profile design. 

There will be two monitors available for the XE fa- 
mily. The XC 141 is a 14-inch color composite moni- 
tor, which will probably sell for under $300. The XM 
128 is a 12 -inch 80-column monochrome monitor, 
which will sell for under $100. A 300 baud, direct 
connect modem will be sold for the XE computers. 
It is called the XM 301 and will sell for under $50. 

ST series. 
Atari's truly new machines are the powerful and fast 
(8 MHz) 130ST and 520ST. The two computers are 



identical, except that the 520ST has 524 bytes of 
RAM instead of 131K bytes. Sleek and low, the STs 
include special-function keys as well as a numeric key- 
pad. They're priced at under $400 and under $600, 
respectively. There is also, reportedly, a 260ST with 
256K bytes of RAM for $499. 

The ST computers use the 16/32-bit MC68000 
microprocessor and allow the use of any of 512 colors 
on their 32K bit-mapped screens. A choice of either 
320x200 pixel, 640x200 pixel or 640x400 pixel modes 
are available. The graphic modes offer 16-color, 4- 
color and monochrome (1-color) choices, respective- 
ly. The STs are said to have RGB, composite color, 
RF color and high resolution monochrome video out- 
put signals. A two-button mouse can also be used 
with these machines. 

Atari ST computers use Digital Research's GEM and 
GEM desktop operating system software (contained, 
along with BASIC and — maybe — Logo, in 192K of 
ROM). The desktop metaphor eliminates the need for 
the use of operating system commands. Instead, GEM 
uses icons, pull-down menus, windows and a mouse, 
to allow user control of the computing environment. 

Both ST computers use a 3^/2 -inch disk drive. Two 
types of disk drives will become available. The SF 354, 
a 500K separate disk drive, will sell for under $150. 
There will also be a disk drive/monitor stand. This 
peripheral is meant to support the SC 1224 monitor 
and has a 31/2 -inch disk drive built into the base. 

(continued on page 35) 



ANALOG COMPUTING 





Unicheck-ing. 

I'd like to commend Mr. Hudson 
on the fantastic job he did with his 
newest checksum program, Uni- 
check (issue 24). It is, without a 
doubt, the easiest, most up-to-date 
checksum program available. 

I do have one problem with it, 
however. When I tell the program 
to LIST data to the printer (1027), 
it prints portions of the data, and 
then always produces an ERROR 
138 message, and printing stops im- 
mediately. 

The program output to screen 
works flawlessly, and the program 
CHECKS perfectly. Could this be 
due to compatibility problems with 
the new 1027? 1 would greatly ap- 
preciate any help you can provide. 

Sincerely, 

Scott D. Kamp 

Birmingham, Ml 

Slower printers, such as the 1027 
and 1020 plotter, require longer time- 
out values than 1 allowed for in the 
original Unicheck program. If you 
have one of these printers and want 
to patch Unicheck so that it will 
work with them, make the following 
changes to the BASIC program: 

45 GOTO 170 

1030 DATA 27A9209De001CA10 

FAA99B8D26eie0ADF006850AAD 

F106850BA0F206850CADF30685 

ei>4C74E440ei578eeeei30, 596 

Note that the only characters to be 
changed in Line 1030 are the last 2 
bytes of the hexadecimal values, which 
have been changed from 05 to 30. 

When the revised BASIC program 
is RUN, it will ask for an output de- 
vice, then create the cassette or disk 
version of Unicheck, without check- 
ing the DATA values. For this reason, 
you should be sure that the program 
worked before making the changes, 
then double-check Line 1030 to verify 
that everything is okay. 



After the program is finished, the 
updated Unicheck is ready to go. 

-T.H. 



Joystick movers. 

I have been wondering, for some 
time, how to move a graphics mode 
4 character around the screen with 
the joystick. Could you help? 

Greg Mehojah 

Chantilly, VA 

Moving a graphics 4 block around 
on the screen is actually very easy, 
and can be done with this short pro- 
gram: 

10 (iHAPHICS 4: DIM JK(15J,J 

YtlSilFOR 1=5 rO 15:READ H 

,Y: JX(IJ-X: JYtl}=Y:HEKT I: 

HEM READ JOYSTICK DATA 

20 DAIA 1,1,1,-1,1,0,0,0,- 

1,1,-1,-1,-1,0,0,0,0,1,0,- 

1,0,0 

30 PXt:40:PY-20:REM INITIAL 

POSITION 
40 COLOR l:PLOr PX,PY:5=5T 
ICKtO}:IF S=15 fHEN 40 
50 COLOR OiPLOT PX,PY:REM 
ERASE OLD POSITION 
68 PX=PX+JXtS> :PY::PY+JYtSJ 
.-REM MOVE DOT 
70 IF PX>79 THEN PX=8:REM 
SCREEN LIMITS 
80 IF PX<0 THEN PX=79 
90 IF PY>39 THEN PY::0 
100 IF PY<e THEN PY=39 
110 <^0T0 40 

As written, the program will 
move only the block, erasing the 
old position each time the block 
moves. By removing Line 50, 
which erases the old position, you 
can draw lines on your TV screen. 

This program can be modified to 
work in any graphics mode by 
changing the values in Lines 
70-100 to correspond to the screen 
limits of the graphics mode you 
want to use. 

-T.H. 



XL/1027 delays. 

When I attempt to print out any 
manuscripts prepared on my Atari 
800XL with a 1027 printer, using 



AtariWriter, a truly exasperating 
thing happens . . . Every once in a 
while, at unpredictable intervals, 
the printer goes "dead" for exactly 

4 minutes, then resumes printing. 
This has happened as often as 

three times a page. The 1027 not 
being the fastest printer to start 
with, a page of text can take 15 or 
20 minutes to print! 

Several calls to Atari (before the 
toll-free number was discontinued) 
brought an interesting variety of 
conflicting responses. Can anyone 
give me the straight dope on what's 
going on here? 

Thank you. 

Ben Poehland 

Philadelphia, PA 

Apparently, the reason for the delay 
lies, not in the AtariWriter, but in 
the XL Operating System. Originally, 
the delay was set up in the 400/800 

05 in order to allow the print heads 
on Atari printers to cool down during 
long printing sessions. The routine 
had a bug, however, and was removed 
from the Revision B OS. 

When the XL series appeared, the 
folks at Atari put the delay back in, 
with all bugs removed, possibly to al- 
low the 1027 's print mechanism to 
cool. This is not a bug, but a safety 
feature intentionally placed in the XL 
series. 

If you don't like the delay, the XL 
BOSS (which we reviewed in issue 
25) should take care of the problem. 

-T.H. 



U-Print U-Pdate. 

Thank you for the excellent re- 
view of the U-Print parallel printer 
interface for the Atari computers. 
There are, however, several points 
which were incorrectly stated due 
to a lack of communications on our 
behalf. 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 7 



The U-Print model A has a re- 
tail price of $89.95 but has no pro- 
visions for internal buffer memory. 
The new U-Print model AO retails 
for $99.95 with no memory, but it 
can be expanded to 64K. 

U-Print model A16 with 16K of 
memory retails for $119.95 and not 
$89.95 as mentioned in the review. 
Model A32 with 32K of memory 
is $139.95, and model A64 with a 
full 64K retails for $179.95. 

The U-Print's other features — 
multiple copies up to 255, reset or 
clear memory button, extra I/O 
connector for daisy chaining, ex- 
tra long cable, and user upgrade- 
able memory — are still standard. 

Please accept our apologies for 
the inaccuracies in the review, but, 
since this was a new product and 
we rushed to meet your deadline, 
problems were bound to arise. 

Digital Devices is committed to 
providing Atari computer owners 
with quality products at reasonable 
prices. We appreciate your support, 
and as the new Atari Corporation 
springs back to life, we are all look- 
ing forward to a prosperous 1985. 

Best regards, 

Charles Frazier 

Digital Devices, Atlanta, GA 



More palette magic. 

First, I would like to congratulate 
you on a "first class" magazine. It's 
really great! Second, 1 really en- 
joyed the Magic Palette program, 
but have made it even better. 

Graphics mode 9 or 11 are good, 
but if you enter or change the pro- 
gram to graphics mode 30 or 31, 
you only get half a screen — but the 
pictures are much better. 

If 1 am correct, graphics modes 
14 (full screen) and 15 (full screen) 
are available only on the new XL 
computers (600XL must have mem- 
ory expansion). 

The following are the additional 

lines needed: 

50 ? "ISENTER GRAPHICS MODE 
, PLEASE" 

55 ? :? "IJ 5IMGLE COLOR C 
ENTER ?}" 

60 ? :? "2) HULT. COLOR CE 
MTER lu- 
es ? :? "3J MED. RE50LUTI0 
N f ENTER 30 OR 313" 




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70 INPUT AZl 

Change Line 240 to read: 
240 GRAPHICS AZ1:F0R 1=0 T 
30:C0L0R I/2:PL0T I^OzDR 
AHTO I,10:NEKT I: COLOR 7:P 
LOT e^iezDRAMTO 79,10 

Jim Kelly 

SnellviUe, GA 

Creator/Animator fix. 

I would like to submit a minor 
fix to one of your magazine's pro- 
grams. The article was published in 
issue 23, October 1984, on page 
33, titled P/M Creator/Animator. 

A small machine language rou- 
tine makes an illegal call to the OS 
EOUTCH (Editor OUT CHarac- 
ter). The following BASIC line ad- 
ded to the program will determine 
the proper vector for the routine 
and enable it to function on all 
computers, including XLs. 

20030 REN MODIFY ML 

20035 POKE 1630, PEEK (58374 

)+l:POKE 1631, PEEK C58375J 

I hope I've been of some assis- 
tance to ANALOG Computing 

readers. 

Dwight Stanley 

Brantford, Ontario, Canada 



CIRCLE #102 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

No-Frills with BASIC XL. 

I recently typed in the nice, little 
No-Frills Alternate Cursor pro- 
gram by Tom Hudson from issue 
23, and was surprised to find that 
it runs just fine with Atari BASIC, 
but won't run with OSS BASIC 
XL. 

It initializes all right, but press- 
ing the RESET button to activate 
the new cursor gets rid of the cur- 
sor altogether — similar to doing a 
POKE 752,1, except there is no way 
of getting the cursor back. 

Is there a "no-frills" way of get- 
ting it to work with BASIC XL? 

Sincerely, 

Bob deWitt 

Provo, UT 

1 REM KIClCmCKMlCMMllKlCltlClClCKKK 

2 REM ^ ^ 

3 REM * N0-FRILL5 CURSOR « 

4 REM « FOR BASIC-XL » 

5 REM » TOM HUDSON « 

6 REM « ANALOG COMPUTING « 

7 REM » » 

8 REM WKMKKltKKMKlCmClCKKllKMM 

10 FOR X=256 TO 364: READ N 
:POKE }<,N:NEXT XzPOKE 289, 
PEEK(12) :POKE 290,PEEKC13} 
SPOKE 12,8!P0KjE15,l 
20 ? "ifPRESS Odddll TO INST 
ALL CURSOR" :NEH 



PAGE 8 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



1808 DflTfl 169,1,133,13,169 

,8,133,12,169,8,141,7,212, 

169,1,141,111,2,162,1,168, 

35,169,7,32,92,228,169 

1818 DATA 58,141,47,2,76,8 

,0,216,169,2,141,29,288,16 

9,1,141,248,2,169,58,141,4 

7,2,169,8,178,157,8 

1828 DATA 6,282,288,258,16 

5,85,18,18,24,185,48,141,2 

,288,165,84,18,10,18,24,18 

5,39,168,169,240,153,8 

1830 DATA 6,238,189,1,173, 

189,1,74,74,74,41,1,288,4, 

169,15,288,2,169,8,141,194 

,2,76,98,228 

BASIC XL likes to turn off player/ 
missile graphics as part of its initiali- 
zation process and whenever it en- 
counters (ouch!) an END statement. 

This can be easily fixed by simply 
rearranging the machine code to al- 
low it to work with BASIC XL, as 
well as regular Atari BASIC. 

-C.B. 

Macro fix. 

I have a fix for a curious "bug" 
in Atari's Macro Assembler/Editor 
package. It seems that, although 
you can make a copy of the disk 



or of individual files via DOS, the 
Macro Assembler program itself 
(AMAC) fails to boot on the back- 
up disk. Not only does this mean 
that you can't make a backup copy 
— which you, having purchased the 
software, have every legal right to 
own — but it also means that the as- 
sembler can't reside on the same 
disk as the files to be assembled, 
since the original is (thankfully) 
write-protected. As a result, you 
have to reinsert the master disk ev- 
ery time you do an assembly. . . 
which just increases the chances of 
damage to the original. This situ- 
ation is clearly unacceptable. For- 
tunately, there is a solution. 

The following one-line program 
will correct this "bug" in the as- 
sembler program, allowing it to run 
con^ectly, even on other disks. Sim- 
ply use DOS to copy the AMAC 
file to a backup disk. Then run the 
following program (you can also ex- 
ecute it directly, by carefully typ- 
ing it in without the line number): 



18 OPEM »1,12,8,"D:AMAC":F 
OR 1=1 TO 8 -.GET ttl,A:MEXT 
I: PUT ttl,288:PUT ttl,34:END 

This changes 2 bytes in the dupli- 
cated program, allowing it to run 
normally. Of course, this should 
only be used to make legitimate 
backup copies for your personal 
use. 

Sincerely, 

James A. Tunnicliffe 

Anaheim, CA 



If you have any questions 
or comments, send them in 
to: 

Reader Comment 

ANALOG Computing 

P.O. Box 23 
Worcester, MA 01603 



DISK WIZARD n 



THE MOST COMPLETE UTILITY PACKAGE 
FOR ATARI* COMPUTERS AT ANY PRICE 

100 % MACHINE LANGUAGE ■ SINGLE LOAD • MENU DRIVEN 

THIS USER FRIENDLY PACKAGE INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING POWERFUL 
PROGRAMS FOR THE ATARI' 400/800/XL SERIES COMPUTERS (40K REOUIRED) 

DISK BACK-UP— SINGLE/DOUBLE DENSITY • SUPPORTS I OR 2 DRIVES 
■ ALLOWS BACKUP OF DISKS PROTECTED BY BAD SECTORING • FAST 
COPY OPTION • SECTOR STATUS SUMMARY • OPTIONAL PRINTOUT OF 
SECTOR STATUS • DISK MAPPING 

DISK EDIT — SINGLE/DOUBLE DENSITY • DISPLAY/MODIFY/PRINT ANY 
SECTOR • SECTOR DISPLAYED IN HEX ASCIl/ATASCM • WORKS WITH 
ANY FORMAT • SCAN SECTORS FOR A SERIES OF BYTES OR A STRING 
• DISPLAY/PRINT DIRECTORY "TRACE/REPAIR FILE LINKS • RECOVER 
AND AUTOMATICALLY VERIFY DELETED FILES • FORMAT DISKS WITH 
AUTOMATIC LOCK OUT OF BAD SECTORS • DECIMAL/HEX NUMBER 
CONVERSION 

DISASSEMBLER — single/double density • disassemble from 

DISK BY SECTOR NUMBERS • DISASSEMBLE COMPOUND BINARY FILES 
BY FILE NAME • OUTPUT TO SCREEN OR PRINTER • SELECTABLE 
MNEMONIC DISASSEMBLY WITH OVER 400 STANDARD ATARI MEMORY 
LOCATION NAMES 

DISK SPEED — VERIFIES/ALLOWS ADJUSTMENT OF DISK SPEED • BAD 
SECTORING (810 ONLY) 

INCLUDES COMPREHENSIVE MANUAL WITH MANY USAGE EXAMPLES 



ORDERING INFORMATION 



MASTERCARD & VISA accepted. 
(N.Y, Residents add 7% sales tax) 
Phone orders accepted on C.O.D. 
and charges. 



$29- /^.^^/ 



PING & HANOLmC 



"ATARI IS a registered Trademark of Atari 



SOFTWARE, INC. 



ORDERS TOLL FREE 
1-800-7320320 

Info, and N.Y. Residents 
1-315-488-0485 




DONT YOU REALIZE 

YOUR COMPUTER WANTS 

TO HELP OUT, TOO? 

You've got your spouse working. 

The hids have paper routes. 

Even the dog provides stud service for a fee. 

Times are hard. 
So why is your computer still unemployed? 

LET YOUR ATARI CONTRIBUTE 
TO THE FAMILY INCOME 

If it's a48Kor64 K Disk System, SENECOM has the approach you may 
have been waiting for. You decide no risk. 

Send just $9.95 for three PDQ (Premium Disl< Quality) diskettes: 
Double Density and Double-Sided (like six top-of-the-line disks!) with 
21-year warranty. 

Boot in the program on the back of each disk and your Atari will tell 
you how it can boost the family income, more than you might have 
thought possible. 

SENECOM'S UNIQUE PLAN 
FOR YOU AND YOUR ATARI 
Your computer will love it. At last it can pull its own weight in the 
family, and more. Maybe lots more. 

And you: will you like it too? Who knows? Some people wouldn't know 
a genuine opportunity from the intestinal flu. Some people will reuse 
the back side of the disk for (sob!) something else. 

At least they'll be using the highest quality disk ever made; a disap- 
pointed computer might take comfort in that. 

ORDER PDQ! write "PDQ" on a paper, with your (legible!) name 

and address. Send with $9.95 to: 
^MMM&@)M Dept. 24, 13 White St., Seneca Falls, m 13148 
SENECOM will pay shipping for USA and Canada. 

NYS residents, add 7% Sales Tax. 

Offer limited to one order per address at this price. 

Atari is a registered trademark of Atari, Inc. 

SENECOM is a registered trademark of Seneca Computer Company, Inc. 



CIRCLE #103 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CIRCLE #104 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ANALOG COMPUTING 




IMPRESSIVE DATARECORDER FROM GENERAL ELECTRIC 

GE's model 3-5156 is designed to operate with many personal computers, and specifically 

with the Atari (and Commodore) line. The 
Compu'Mate is comprised of two modules 
that inter-connect — the recorder and the in- 
terface to which the Atari-type connectors 
attach. 

Other features include a tape counter and 
a recording LED, which indicates signal in- 
tensity. A data level slide switch allows for 
precise adjustment of volume, and a built-in 
speaker lets you listen to the tape to easily 
locate multiple programs on a single tape. 

Includes Atari I/O cable, AC adapter and 
Atari-specific instructions, $45.00 to $60.00. 
For information, contact General Electric 
Co., Syracuse, NY 13221 - (800) 626-2000. 




BASIC INTELLIGENCE 

BASIC Reference Files emphasizes diagrams 
in presenting its BASIC "how to" informa- 
tion. The book was written by a once-upon- 
a-time beginner who had been through the 
wringer a few too many times. 




Designed in a "logical manner with sub- 
jects grouped together," the reference book 
is written for the Atari, DOS 2. OS and 
single-density drives, but most of its infor- 
mation will benefit all Atari BASIC users. 

Chapters cover BASIC anatomy, special 
effects (colors, borders, flashing colors), help- 
ers (NEW, REM, STOP, etc.), FOR/NEXT 
loops, PEEKing, POKEing, READ/DATA 
routines and calculations. 

Written by Dennis Ashley, spiral bound, 
115 pages, $9.95 + $1.50 p&h, The SAGE 
Idea Works, 112 Retriever Lane, Summer- 
viWe, SC 19483 - (803) 871-7579. 



ATARIWRITER PRINTER/DRIVERS 
STILL AVAILABLE 

Gary Furr, the designer of AtariWriter, 
wrote and sold a set of routines that allowed 
the word processor to work with various 
non-Atari printers. Previously sold through 
the Atari Program Exchange, they are now 
available directly from Gary, with documen- 
tation. 
Supported are the following printers: 
Atari 1020 & 1027 
IDS-480 Microprism 
EPSON MX-80/100 
EPSON RX-80/100 
EPSON FX-80/100 
C.Itoh ProWriter 8510 
Okidata 80, 82/83, 84, 82/93 
Mannesmann Tilly Spirit-80 
Mannesmann Tally 160/180L 



SOD BOMBS AWAY 

Imagic's latest arcade-style game. Chop- 
per Hunt, will test your reflexes and daring 
to the limit, as you pilot your 'copter and 
blow away earth in search of buried treasure. 
Use your missiles and bombs to assault the 
ground and protect yourself from the "dirt 
bombs" dropped from aircraft passing over- 
head. 







As you progress through the 99 levels, 
you'll encounter higher elevations, water 
deposits and portable enemy missile launch- 
ers. Your onboard supply of firepower is lim- 
ited, so frequent runs back to your landing 
pad will be necessary. 

Written by ANALOG Computing's Tom 
Hudson for Atari/Commodore, 48K disk, 
$19.95 from Imagic, 981 University Avenue, 
Los Gatos, CA 95030 - (800) 654-7340. 



Diablo 620 
Panasonic 109 
NEC 8023A 
Gemini 10 & lOX 
BMC PB 401 
Silver Reed 770 
Cost is $10.00 (cashier's check or money order) from Gary W. Furr, P.O. Box 1073, Moun- 
tain View, CA 94042. Specify which driver you require. 



ROBOT PLOTTER 

The Penman plotter from Axiom offers a new twist — it "drives" over a stationary, 
paper surface, rather than have the paper do the moving. Any paper up to 3 feet by 3 
is suitable for this three-pen plotter's use. 

The Penman connects to an RS-232 seri- 
al interface, and consists of a main control 
module which remains fixed and attaches 
to the plotter via a ribbon cable. The plot- 
ter itself is just 4 inches square. 

Any number of colors can be used, three 
colors at a time. A built-in character set 
can be accessed for printing down to 1mm 
in height, and the full range of geometric 
shapes (circles, arcs and lines) can be drawn. 

Price is $399.00, from Axiom, 1014 Gris- 
wold Avenue, San Fernando, CA 91340 — 
(213) 365-9521. 



flat 
feet 




PAGE 10 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 




ELECTRIC NOVELS FROM SYNAPSE 

Synapse Software has announced a series of ad- 
venture-type programs, packaged in hard-bound 
book form. All relevant information (the storyline 
and characters) is introduced early on in the "jour- 
ney," then your task is to finish them, using the 
floppy disk furnished in the back of the book. 

Blank pages are bound into the novel for notes 
or mapping. A new "parser" developed by Synapse 
allows the user to "talk" to the computer in far 
more than just two-word sentences. Mindwheel is 
the first novel, about a trip into the minds of four 
deceased people of extraordinary power. Essex deals 
with an intergalactic search and rescue. 

Other titles to follow will include: Robin, a sam- 
urai adventure; Breakers, a science fiction story 
on the planet Borg, and Brimstone, a medieval 
story. Mindwheel and Essex will be shipped im- 
mediately, and the rest in mid-spring. 

Priced at $39.95 each, disk. Synapse Software, 
521 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 - (415) 
527-7751. 




BRIDGE FOR THE ATARI 

Compubridge from Artworx was compiled from Shirley Silverman's text, "Five Card Ma- 
jor Bridge Teacher's Manual." The computer 
generates an infinite number of random 
practice hands, corresponding to the ten 
chapters in the enclosed text. 

Compubridge will evaluate your actions 
while correcting your errors and any weak 
moves, then suggests alternate strategies. 

The program and text begin at the early 
stages, for novice players, but gets involved 
enough so that an experienced player may 
benefit from the program. Artworx also of- 
fers Bridge 4.0, a full bridge-playing game. 

Cost is $29.95 for the disk, 48K required. 
Artworx Software Co., 150 North Main Street, Fairport, NY 14450 




(800) 828-6573. 



KODAK EXPANDS INTO MAGNETIC DISK LINE 

Moving into the floppy disk market, Kodak now offers a full range of diskettes, including 
5'/4-inch, single-sided/double density and double-sided/single density — both compatible with 
any Atari-type disk drive. 

The 5V4-inch disks come 
in packages of ten to a box 
for $38.50 (retail price for 
single-sided/double density) 
and $48.50 (retail price for 
double-sided/double density). 
They're available in "two 
packs," too — slim, two-disk 
packages for the home users 
of personal computers. 

Kodak also has 3V2-inch 
disks on the market, for the 
soon-to-be-released 
16/32-bit Atari computers. 
Ten of these smaller disks 
per box retail at $32.50. 

Available from the 
Eastman Kodak Company, 
Rochester, NY 14650, or 
Vook for the familiar "yellow 
box" Kodak packaging at 
your computer store. 




Kodak 

Diskettes 




Kodak 

Diskettes 








OTHER NEWS 

Micro-Gram, an educational line from 
Random House, offers several new titles, in- 
cluding Word Blaster, Galaxy Math Facts 
and Grand Prix. 

All require 48K and are packaged with up 
to seven disks. 

Prices range from $150.00 to $174.00. 
Contact Random House School Division, 
Dept. 9305, 400 Hahn Road, Westminster, 
MD 21157 - (800) 638-6460. 



Kaznet is a low-cost circuit analysis pro- 
gram which allows for electronic designing 
at home. 

It requires 48K disk, printer and Micro- 
soft BASIC II. 

The cost is $195.00, from Kaznet Software, 
1917 W. Tuliptree Drive, Huntsville, AL 
35803 - (205) 883-9840. 



Morsecode Master, Music Player and 
The Computer Gourmet are among the 
latest Atari-compatible software packages 
from New Horizons. 

For more information, you may contact 
New Horizons Software, P.O. Box 180253, 
Austin, TX 78718. 



Datasoft announces the licensing of Alter- 
nate Reality from Paradise Programming, a 
role-playing fantasy game. You've been ab- 
ducted by an alien spacecraft and set in an- 
other time and place. 

Cost is $39.95, disk, from Datasoft, 19808 
Nordhoff Place, Chatworth, CA 91311 — 
(818) 701-5161. 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 11 



Griffin^s 
Lair 

Educational 

Programs 

Revievi^ 




by Braden E. Griffin, M.D. 



As I thought about the introduction for my column 
this month, I wondered how best to explain the ab- 
sence of Griffin's Lair from last month's issue. Sud- 
denly, an unearthly shadow of a thought began to ooze 
through a crack in my previously- impregnable ego. 

Could it be that no one is interested in the reason 
the column was missing? Is there a chance that the 
readers were fully aware of its absence and were de- 
lighted? Or, worse yet, that nobody even noticed! Is 
it conceivable that hearts were not broken, or that 
deep concerns for Brad's well-being were not accom- 
panied by weeping and the gnashing of teeth? ("Para- 
noia strikes deep," doesn't it? —Ed.) Naaah. . .Suffice 
it to say (I love a cliche), I should stick to Electronic 
Arts' One on One, rather than the real thing. . . 

This month's column takes a look at the educational 
aspects of CompuServe. You're probably thinking that 
this subject would have been well suited to the last 
issue. That's just what the staff here thought, too. I 
fooled you all. 

Those of you with modems are aware of many of 
the educational opportunities available "on-line," as 
we say. As the technological revolution continues, "a 
chicken in every (microwave)" will be accompanied 
by "a modem in every condo." This slogan may not 
get anyone elected President, but its realization seems 
likely. 



The field of telecommunications is in its infancy 
and has experienced its share of growing pains. Just 
as many of our silver-tongued sports commentators 
say when citing the potential of young athletes, the 
future of telecommunications lies ahead! Huh? 

There are many on-line vendors. The Source, Dia- 
log, BRS (Bibliographic Retrieval Service), Dow Jones 
and many others offer extensive databases for a vari- 
ety of uses. Countless individually-operated Bulletin 
Board Services provide the user even further, often 
more specific, opportunities to access information. 

I could not hope to cover all of these areas. Nor 
could I afford it. I would guess that the major tele- 
communications service most frequently used by home 
computerists is CompuServe. I've no data to support 
this, but there's a chance I might be right. 

Anyway, CompuServe Information Service (CIS) 
is easy to use and offers a wide range of services. I 
would like to highlight some of these as they relate 
to education. 

There are several "how to" articles and books on 
telecommunications, and I will not get into that here. 
However, I would recommend a most helpful and in- 
formative book by Charles Bowen and David Peyton, 
entitled How to Get the Most out of CompuServe. I 
found it invaluable in helping me around the network. 
I also borrowed some of their "thoughts" for this ar- 



PAGE 12 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



tide. The fact that they, too, hail from West (by God) 
Virginia had no influence on me whatsoever. They 
escape the hills through telephone lines. I took the 
train. 

Education and CompuServe. 

The complex of available services comprising Com- 
puServe is much like that of a city and has been re- 
ferred to by many as "Micropolis." Knowing how to 
get around is important, but first, one should know 
where one is going. With all that is available, it's help- 
ful to decide what it is one wants to know. 

Information, please. 

A choice from several news services allows ready 
access to tomes of current information. The Washing- 
ton Post, St. Louis Post'Dispatch, and AP Videotex 
Wire Services are the principal sources covering world 
and national news. The latter service is constantly up- 
dated and is provided to CompuServe at about the 
same time it goes to the media. Students in social 
studies will appreciate the importance of this facet 
of CompuServe. 

The weekly science assignment has always created 
chaos in our house, as Dad and Mom go scurrying 
around, looking for an interesting article for the kid 
to report on. Now a wide variety of articles may be 
scanned, with the one selected downloaded to the 
printer. Aside from a multitude of similar scholastic 
endeavors, the essence of these services creates an 
educational environment for all of us — and a greater 
awareness of the world today. 

Go look it up. 

I have always been hesitant to buy a large set of 
encyclopedias. Though frequently tempted, I know 
that some of the information will become dated, and 
the almost daily appearance of new discoveries and 
explanations of the old ones would create a signifi- 
cant void in this important resource. 

If only a comprehensive, current resource were avail- 
able, without having to buy additional volumes or 
replace the loose-leaf pages of another. Grolier's Aca- 
demic American Encyclopedia is just such a resource. 

The same sort of information one finds in a con- 
ventional printed encyclopedia is contained in its elec- 
tronic counterpart. The advantage is that it is updated 
and has new information added twice a year. This par- 
ticular service is offered on a subscription basis, in 
addition to the regular on-line charges. The option 
of subscribing monthly is an excellent feature, since 
there are often long periods of time when it may not 
be needed. 

Initially, it is a little difficult to search for specific 
subject matter. Conducting a search is educational in 
itself and helps develop an organized and disciplined 
approach to information gathering. 

It's often necessary to provide illustrations and other 
graphic enhancements, along with text, to ensure the 
complete understanding of a subject. Imagine how 



difficult it would be to fully appreciate the parts of 
the human anatomy without pictures. The electronic 
encyclopedia is sadly lacking in this area. As rapidly 
as technology is advancing, however, it probably won't 
be long before this capability is standard. 

I love encyclopedias. There isn't anything quite like 
thumbing through the almost delicate pages of a fine 
encyclopedia. It is the ultimate book, with a reverence 
about it. Many detours are encountered while search- 
ing for a specific item. The joy of an unexpected dis- 
covery is felt when one happens upon an area quite 
disparate from the intended subject. . .and is seem- 
ingly seduced with the desire to learn more and more 
about it. 

This is done, of course, at the expense of time ori- 
ginally intended for another subject, but it's usually 
worth it. The single-minded nature of an electronic 
search does not promote such digressions. This may 
be an asset to those gadabouts among us with quix- 
otic tendencies. 

. . .On the way to the forum. 

Based on the original Roman model, the forum is 
a place for open discussions of topics of interest. The 
format for such activities is provided by CompuServe 
in an electronic forum, or Special Interest Group 
(SIC). Not everyone has the same interests. Conse- 
quently, there are a variety of SIGs available. . .quite 
a variety. If one has an interest, any interest, be as- 
sured that there is a SIG dedicated to it. 

Several methods are provided for the exchange of 
information with SIGs. The most frequently-used one 
involves message boards. They serve as the founda- 
tion for the open discussion. Messages relating to the 
specific interests of the group may be read by all. Mes- 
sages may be left to seek an answer to a question, or, 
conversely, a response to another's inquiry may be 
conveyed. 

This ongoing public dialogue is unique to telecom- 
munications. One may also leave private messages, if 
desired. On-line conferences underscore the distinc- 
tive nature of the forums. Formal conferences with 
guest "speakers" are conducted and encourage ques- 
tions from the audience, through a moderator. Less 
structured conferences are also held regularly, more 
closely resembling bull or rap sessions. These may be 
programs in the public domain or related articles 
provided especially for group members. 

The vast majority of SIGs are open to the public, 
with no additional cost over the usual connect time 
charges. They are run by Sysops, or Systems Opera- 
tors, who receive a small portion of the regular con- 
nect time charges. Although this remuneration may 
help defray some of the costs, most SIGs run at a 
deficit and continue to function only because of the 
dedication of the Sysop. The greater the number of 
participants, the less the financial burden is for the 
Sysop. 

New members receive a friendly welcome and are 



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ADVANCED 
MUSICSYSTEM II 

by LEE ACTOR 
Allows you to create music 
with your Atari computer! 
All new machine code. 

* Control over pitch 
duration, envelope 
dynamic level, meter, 
tempo and key. 

* 4 independent voices 

* 5'/2 octaves per voice 

* Save up to 8200 notes 

* Custom DOS 

* FULL instructions 

* 24K disk 
Originally $29.95 Only $14.95 

ORIGINAL ADVENTURE 

by Bob Howell 

For all Atari computers. 

The Original 

Colossal Cave 

Adventure faithfully 

reproduced from the 

'main-frames'. 

This is the one 

that launched the whole 

Adventure craze of today! 

* Two mazes 

* 130 rooms 

* Deadly Dragons 

* Nasty Dwarves 

* Tenacious Troll 

* The Pirate & fvlore! 

* 86 coded hints 

* SAVE/RESUME 

* 40K disk or 32K tape 
Originally $29.95 Only $14.95 ' 




QUALITY WORD PROCESSING 

ESI WRITER! At last a brand-new Word Processor 
that has more features and is easier to use than 
anything else available for the Atari. Easy for the 
beginner to use, it asks questions and remembers 
the answers. ESI WRITER is so sophisticated that it 
has many more features we don't even have room to 
mention I Works with ANY Atari. 

* Reads any text file * Built in Help screen 
* Very fast ! * Works with ANY printer 

* Instant top, bottom or text location 

without scrolling! 
* Every printer feature * DISK ONLY (Any Atari) 

* Search and replace * Block move text 
*Page eject/start * Set margins/lines etc. 

*Full justification * Print headers etc. 

* Block delete etc. * Change video color 

* Over 50 pages of docs and tutorials 
TRUST US ON THIS ONE ! YOU WILL LOVE IT! 
Originally $49.95 LotsaBytes price $24.95 



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If you purchase any 3 or more disks at a time 

you may choose any 1 of the following disks 

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Full 100% Replacement guarantee .Any disk found to be defective will be replaced free and we will also refund your return 
postage. All orders shipped by First Class U.S. Mail. Add SI. 95 s flipping and tiandling for 1 to 5 disks. Add S2. 95 for 6 to 12 
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Money Orders. Sorry, no COD or Ctiarge Cards. Allow ttiree weeks for personal ctiecks to clear. 

15445 Ventura Blvd., Suite 10H 
Sherman Oaks, CA 91413 

Atari IS Ihe registered Irademaik of Atari. Corp 

CIRCLE #105 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



LotsaBytes 



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PAGE 14 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



encouraged to continue active involvement. The first 
encounters with SIGs are a Uttle overwhelming, but 
plenty of help is provided. The book referred to earlier 
by Bowen and Peyton has an excellent section on 
SIGs and how to get the most out of them. 

As mentioned earlier, if there is an interest, there 
is likely a SIG dedicated to it. Examples of some of 
these forums include: aviation, space, medicine, writ- 
ing, education, science, programming, computer edu- 
cation and veterinary medicine. Many of these areas 
have several forums available. 

There are computer-specific forums which are quite 
active. I tried to enter the legal forum, but I had previ- 
ously taken the TMC I-Q Test (see below) and discov- 
ered that anyone scoring in triple figures is denied 
access! (Just a little M.D. humor.) 

Boola boola. 

Two services are available which provide informa- 
tion about college education. The College Board is 
operated by the College Entrance Examination Board. 
This service covers topics such as choosing a college, 
preparing for the SATs, advanced placement, adult 
education and financial aid. It also provides current 
information on College Board SAT and Achievement 
Test dates and fees. 

The College Press Service began as a national col- 
lege news service. It is aimed at those involved in 
higher education, and covers those events which af- 
fect them. From legislative acts and court decisions 
in education to classroom trends and funding patterns, 
a broad range of subjects is reported. They are cov- 
ered both with news briefs and in-depth reporting. 
There's even a classified section, where advertisements 
may be posted. 

Fun and games. 

A far-ranging variety of educational games may be 



played on-line through CompuServe. Although no 
sophisticated programming is involved, many of them 
are quite challenging. Some are impossible. 

An example of the latter is The Whiz Quiz, which 
allows as many as four players up to thirty questions 
in the same category at the same time. A perfect score 
gains entrance into the Wizards Hall of Fame. This 
is an offering from the Grolier's encyclopedia. 

An extensive game list is found under The Mul- 
tiple Choice (TMC). The TMC 1-Q Test referred 
to earlier is included here. This is a fairly long test, 
containing several categories. Problem solving, num- 
ber recitation and analogies are but a few of them. 
It is designed for adults and would, no doubt, cause 
experts in this area of testing to break out in hives. 
Interestingly, though I thought I was doing terribly, 
I scored almost exactly the same as I had on previ- 
ous, authentic IQ tests. 

Other available offerings from TMC include the 
following: So You Think You Know Me, Trivia Un- 
limited, Categorically Trivial, Classic Quotes, Per- 
sonality Profile, Witty Write-ins, Touch Type Tu- 
tor, Super Brain Challenge, TMC Analogies, Sports 
Rules Quiz, J*U*M*B*L*E*D Words, Silly Fill- 
ins, State Your Capitals and Trivia for Kids. 

All of these games begin with specific information 
concerning the suggested age, classification, number 
of players, special requirements and minimum screen 
width. The instructions are clear and concise. These 
games make for a stimulating and enjoyable evening. 

That's all, folks. 

I've really only touched on a few of the many educa- 
tional facets of telecommunications. There are many 
extensive databases, on just about every subject, read- 
ily available through CompuServe or other major on- 
line vendors. It's exciting to imagine what this field 
will be like in a few years. Hello. . .Central? D 



Talk to 
ANALOG Computing 

We remind you that three members of our staff can now be regularly found on CompuServe. If you're 
a CompuServe member, you can contact Tom Hudson, Charles Bachand or Art Leyenberger by leaving 
a message on the Atari SIG, which can be accessed by typing GO PCS- 13 2 at any menu page. 

The Atari SIG has logged over 100,000 calls— with over 60,000 messages posted! They have a staff 
of highly competent SYSOPs, headed up by Ron Luks, who are more than happy to help you. Their 
program database contains well over a megabyte (that's one million bytes, folks!) of Atari programs that 
can be downloaded into your computer. 

So, if you need to get in touch with ANALOG Computing, you can do it through CompuServe. Our 
user numbers are: _ ,, , 

Tom Hudson 70775,424 

Charles Bachand 73765,646 

Art Leyenberger 71266,46 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 15 



FIELD OF FIRE 

SSI, INC. 

883 Stierlin Road, Building A-200 

Mountain View, CA 94043 

48K Disk $39.95 

by Patrick J. Kelley 

It is the final months of WWII. You're in command 
of Easy Company, one of the most battle-seasoned 
and toughest components of the famed 1st Infantry 
Division — The Big Red One. You've seen the war from 
its first bloody days, and after three long years, you 
just want to go home. Battle after battle has unfolded 
before you, and you've had to write one too many of 
"those letters" to the folks at home. For you. Thanks- 
giving and Christmas dinner meant a cold messkit of 
rations, while big German 88s dropped shells around 
you, with the air full of smoke and death. But it's al- 
most behind you now, as victory awaits just around 
the bend. . .or over in the next town. 

SSI's newest foray into the exciting world of WWII 
is called Field of Fire, fashioned after the exploits of 
the aforementioned Easy Co. This game is a master- 
ful rendition of the classic wargame popularized in 
the past, with a few new twists. 

As topkick, you must take your platoons of infantry 
and light armor into combat, through eight different 
scenarios that FF has cooked up for you. You won't 
have the experience of an Easy Co. trooper when 
you've finished, but you will have a new insight into 
the rigors of command. 

Let's go, Easy! 

You begin with your troops spread out before you, 
ready for orders. Symbols designate the makeup of 
a certain unit, differentiating between Rifle Squad, 
Antitank Squad, Recon Squad, Tank Squad, Com- 
mand Post, Machine Gun Squad and Mortar Squad. 
A mobile cursor is used to designate which unit is 
to receive orders, where it is to concentrate fire, and 
where it is to move. '\ 

Actual play is divided into separate phases: Obser- 
vation, Fire Order, Movement Orders and Operations, 
where the real-time combat takes place. During the 
operations phase, you see what kind of leader you are, 
as your "men" carry out your orders. Their computer- 
ized fate is in your hands, as is the tide of battle. 

Most people cannot sympathize with a computer 
piece or unit as it's taking a shellacking, but this re- 
viewer can, and does. Every time one of my units is 
embroiled in a firefight, I can be seen alternately winc- 
ing, screaming, cajoling, swearing or covering my eyes 
—depending on the outcome. The air surrounding my 
terminal is also known to take on a distinct blue haze, 
due to the extraordinarily high obscenity count. 

Someone at SSI must have seen me coming in this 
department; they've added one of the little features 
that makes FF a winner. Each one — and 1 mean each 



one — of your pieces has a name and a brief history 
attached, making it that much harder to see him get 
taken out. No longer is it just a bunch of pixels, but 
PFC. Mergen or Sgt. Sprock who gets splashed to the 
four winds. I find this little detail quite endearing, 
giving FF a certain flair. But, back to the front. 

Panzers, comin' over the ridge! 

As FF progresses, you throw your men against the 
forces of the Wehrmacht for control of your computer- 
ized turf, and get down to business. Play of each of 
the game scenarios is fast paced and not at all prey 
to the type of slow-moving, anemic action of other 
computer games. 

The rotation through the game's phases is swift, and 
your score is displayed periodically, corresponding to 
your computer-assigned victory level (Questionable, 
Minor, Moderate and Major). The computer bases 
your score on different criteria depending on the level, 
so read up on each before you play. 

Familiarizing yourself with the particulars of each 
scenario will help you, just as boning up on terrain 
details before an engagement aids a real infantry com- 
mander. An additional hint — get your tanks and mor- 
tar squads up onto high ground. This will increase 
your visibility and range, and deprive the enemy of 
a good shot at your behind. 

As the levels progress, you'll find that your enemy's 
determination to make you history does, also. All I 
can give you in the way of advice is: keep your eyes 
and ears open. Be ready to exploit any weakness that 
the enemy shows. Use your mortar squads to suppress 
armor movement and harass infantry. Move your in- 
fantry out across the terrain in a straight line (men 
who are bunched up give the German artillary a field 
day, and can lose you a game fast). Upper levels of 
FF are for masochists only. . . those who enjoy seeing 
their troops drop like flies. 

C'mon, Easy — we've got a war to win! 

The actual game scenarios of FF are divided into 
eight separate actions or campaigns. Each of these 
has its own difficulty level, so if you want to try your 
luck at various levels of play, you can. Most of the 
campaigns you'll fight have a foundation in fact, based 
after actual combat situations the Big Red One found 
itself in. Grab your steel pot, sling that rifle, grease 
that MG and fix your bayonet. You're about to step 
into the Field of Fire. 

The battles. 

There's a night patrol mission into a Tunisian vil- 
lage, where you must stir up trouble and get out, be- 
fore Rommel's Afrika Corps rushes back. Or you may 
have two hours to mop up the Germans and secure 
a winding mountain road for the main advance to 
come. 

Perhaps you'll prove yourself in the spearhead of 
the invasion forces at Omaha Beach, or help to seal 

(continued on page 91) 



PAGE 16 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



MicroDOS 

XL 



32K Disk 



by Walter D. Lord 



MicroDOS XL is a program that combines sever- 
al Atari features into a menu, with the use of a joy- 
stick or the console buttons to select and run files 
easily Due to its small size, it loads and runs almost 
instantly Its primary use is with games, because it will 
only load and run object (binary) files — such as as- 
sembly language or compiled BASIC games. 

Loading it. 

Listing 1 (BASIC) will produce a file called MICRO- 
DOS.OBJ. This is the "creator" program that writes 
MicroDOS XL onto a disk. 

After typing in the program, save it in case of a 
computer lock-up. Then RUN it. MicroDOS XL will 
instruct you to insert a disk containing DOS and then 
press RETURN. After you've done this, the file MI- 
CRODOS.OBJ will be written. During the write, data 
lines will be listed and checked. If there is a data er- 
ror, the program will display a data error message be- 
low the line where it occurred. If no error is found 
in that line, the previous line should be checked. The 
FINISHED message will display when the write is 
complete. 

To run the creator program, load the MICRODOS. 
OBJ with any standard DOS (not BASIC). The screen 
will blank while loading, then an instruction/selection 
screen will appear. 



Follow instructions by inserting a formatted disk— to 
which you want to write MicroDOS XL— into any 
drive. This disk may be empty or contain files, as long 
as it is formatted and there are five free sectors or a 
DOS.SYS file. Press the SELECT button to change 
the drive number if it's not correct. When you press 
START, the write will begin. 

During the write, any file that has the .SYS exten- 
sion and starts with the letter D will be unlocked and 
deleted (D*.SYS). AUTORUN.SYS files won't be de- 
leted but will not autorun. MicroDOS XL then writes 
the DOS.SYS file, tests for density of write and writes 
boot sectors. The message - DONE - will be displayed 
if there were no errors. If there is an error, the mes- 
sage ERROR and the error number will be displayed 
(see BASIC manual). 

The creator will write a double density MicroDOS 
XL if the DOS is loaded with supports and the disk 
is formatted in double density. The density of the disk 
being written will be displayed after a density test. 

To boot MicroDOS XL, place the disk in drive 1. 
Remove all cartridges, turn the computer off and then 
on (pressing the OPTION key if using an XL com- 
puter). MicroDOS XL will then boot and display all 
locked files (remember to lock all the files you want 
displayed). 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 17 



File selection is made with the joystick or keyboard. 
The currently selected file is shown magnified and 
changing color in the middle of the screen. By push- 
ing the joystick forward (up) and back (down), or by 
pressing OPTION (up) and SELECT (down), the file- 
names will scroll through the magnified line. When 
the filename you want is magnified, press the joystick 
button or START to load the file. 

Pressing the SYSTEM RESET button will cause the 
computer to reboot (cold start) the current disk. This 
is useful if the wrong disk is entered (to see what files 
are on the disk) or if the wrong file is selected (only 
if the file is not completely loaded). If the disk con- 
tains MicroDOS XL, it will instantly run and display 
the locked files. 

MicroDOS XL occupies five available and four un- 
available sectors on a disk. The available sectors are 
used by the file DOS.SYS, which contains the dis- 
play, character set and program to select which file 
to load. The four unavailable sectors are the three 
boot sectors (sectors 1-3) and the very last sector on 
the disk (sector 720), which contains the program to 
load and run the DOS.SYS file. 

MicroDOS XL replaces normal DOS and will free 
all but five of the sectors used by DOS. It is compat- 
ible with all Atari computers but not with enhanced 
density format, due to the use of sector 720. Also, no 
DOS commands are supported, so programs doing file 
(not sector) reads and writes will not work properly. 

Listing 2 is for the creator program, which contains 
MicroDOS XL. It was written using OSS MAC/65. 

So. . . put in the disk, turn on your computer, grab 
a joystick and take off! D 

Listing L 
BASIC listing. 

10 REH «*« MICRODOS HL *** 

20 DATA 0,1, 2, 3, 4*5,6,7, 8, 9, 9, 8, 8, 0,8, 

0,8,18,11,12,13,14,15 

38 DIM DATS C91J,HEKC22J: FOR X=8 TO 22: 

READ M:HEHtXJ=M:NEXT X : HNE=998 :RESTOR 

E 1888: TRAP 118:? "CHECKIHG DATA" 

48 LIIIE=LIME+18:? "LIliE :"; LINE : READ DA 

TS:IF LENCDATSJ098 THEN 158 

58 DflTLIII=PEEK(183}+PEEKC184)»256:IF D 

ATLINOLINE THEM ? "LINE ";LIMEj" MI55 

ING'" :END 

68 FOR X=l TO 83 5TEP 2:D1=A5C CDATSCXJ 

J-48:D2=A5C(DATS<X+1)J-48:BYTE=HEX(D13 

)(164HEKtD2) 

70 IF PAS5=2 THEN PUT III, BYTE :NEXT X:R 

EAD CHKSUM:G0T0 40 ^ ,..^„ 

80 TOTAL=TOTAL*BVTE:IF T0TAL>959 THEM 

T0TAL=T0TAL-1000 

90 NEXT X:READ CHK5UM:IF T0TAL=CHK5UM 

THEN 40 

100 GOTO 150 

110 IF PEEKC1553 06 THEN 158 

120 IF PASS THEM CLOSE ttl:EMD 

138 ? "INSERT DISK MITH DOS, PRESS RET 

URN";:INPUT DAT$:OPEN ttl,8,0,"D : AUTORU 

N.SVS" 

140 ? :? "WRITING FILE":PASS=2:LIME=99 

0: RESTORE 1000: TRAP 110: GOTO 40 

158 ? "BAD DATA: LINE "; LINE: END 

1000 DATA FFFF2F022Fe2e0C03FD13FAe4eA9 

00AA9D004eE8D0FAEEC73F88D0Fie0E202E302 

C03Fe057FB5788838e878e87,78 



1818 DATA A91B85eAA987858BAD1807F88218 

684C77E48ie008AD0e878D0883D883EEe983A9 

e08D188785418De4e38544A9, 577 

1820 DATA e48De5e38545AD19878D8A83ADlA 

e78DeB03A9318D88e3A9818D8183A9528D82e3 

2eD987AD82848DE882AD8384, 788 

1838 DATA 8DE1822e8188A288B144C9FFD814 

28BFe7B144C9FFDe8620BF074C8287A9FF8546 

E8B144954628BFe7E8Ee84D8, 17 

1840 DATA F4A5468D9C87A5478D9D87B98ee4 

8DFFFF28BFe7AD9De7C549B88AEE9C87D8EBEE 

9D87D8EeAD9Ce7C54898EF2e , 988 

1058 DATA FAe74Ce687C8C443B8ei6eA87DBl 

4429838D8B83C8B1448D8A838D8B83F0368A48 

2eED8738FBACee8788B14485, 213 

1868 DATA 4368AAA88868A9488D83e3A9e78D 

86834C59E49848FC57F7582e8C88e8A8A98B8D 

E282A9088DE382606CE28228 , 691 

1878 DATA 8C886CE8e2A9FF8543A9698D8A83 

A9818DeBe3A9e48D8583A9e88D84838548A98A 

8549A94E8546A97185472eED, 856 

1880 DATA 87384DEE8A83A28e8644Ae8eB144 

F84838382928Fe2CE643A883B1448148E648C8 

C885D8F5B14438E9288146E6 , 818 

1898 DATA 46Dee2E647C8C810DeEEA5461869 

lD854698e2Ee47A5441869188544CD8e87F0Be 

D8BAB9486199C4e288D8F7A9,362 

1188 DATA E88D3882A96e8D3182A92C8D8e82 

A9618Dei82A9388DF482A9F88D8ED4A9e88544 

85478548A9898D85D4A543F8, 175 

1118 DATA 89Ae24A26eA987285CE4A9218D2F 

82A547F8FCA548eAAABD8e8A8D19e7BD818A8D 

lA87A90eAAA8Ae9De828E8D8, 737 

1128 DATA FAEEEE5888D8F4F858FD58EE1887 

4C74E48eeeFB68FFFF2F822Fe288eB684C61A2 

8eBD88Ee9Dee38E8D8F7EE12 , 559 

1138 DATA 68EE8FeeAD8F68C9E2DeEA6eA544 

D84AADlFD86A6A9e2A6A9818AD7S826A9812eA 

981EAC8482F886AD1FD86AB8,941 

1148 DATA 48E647D83CA548C543B836E648A2 

28Ae8898F0eCA548F029C648A2DSA8FFA98A85 

4986458446A98eSDlFD8E644,591 

1158 DATA A649BDD46e3821E6498D85D4C989 

9884A9888544A5142983D88BADC4e218698189 

888DC4e24C62E4298F48ADF8,45 

1168 DATA 601865458DF868ADF16865468DF1 

68ADFB681865458DFB6eADFC6065468DFC60AD 

FE681865458DFE68ADFFe865,187 

1178 DATA 468DFF68684C7968F8ei8203e4e5 

060708e988878685848382ei08F9787e7847eE 

615873887033333333333392, 993 

1180 DATA 8eDe4AFC68F76171734871333333 

3333331278461C6141E868e8e8EDE9E3F2EFE4 

EFF38888F8EC80e8F5F000E4,487 

1198 DATA EFF7EEe8E6E9F2E5888048AD8BD4 

C94eB884A984D888AD48618D19D8A9828D8AD4 

8D84D46848688D852888E282,86S 

1288 DATA E3828B68e831D6313F33337F7373 

73887E66667F67677F007F67676063637F887E 

66667777777F8e7F68607F70,77 

1218 DATA 707F087F68687F787e78887F6360 

6F67677F807373737F737373887F1C1C1C1C1C 

7Fe88CeC8C8E8E6E7E886666, 579 

1228 DATA 6C7F676767883838387878787E8e 

677F7F776767678867777F6F6767678e7F6363 

6767677F807F63637F707070, 832 

1230 DATA 007F63636767677F077E66667F77 

7777007F607F0373737F007F1C1C1C1C1C1C08 

67F861536267676767677Fe8,69e 

1248 DATA 676767676F3ElCee6767676F7F7F 

67087373733E676767006767677F1C1C1C007F 

666ClS37677FAA7eBB70e823,586 

1258 DATA e98837212C34882C2F3224881119 

181484e3858380888Ae38B83D882E282E382ED 

87Ee82Eie215080864FB64A8,224 

1268 DATA 85B9486199C48288DeF7A9FF8D38 

82A9658D3182Ae82A2eeBD00E09D0040E8D0F7 

EElB64EElE6488D8ECA2DeBD,119 

1278 DATA 56619D8741CAD8F7A9488DF482A9 

218D2F82ADlFD86A982D6AB8F7ADD665C934De 

84A931D8831869818DD6658D, 545 

1288 DATA E8658DEC65291789888D537eA9ee 

8514A932C514D8FCFeCDA217A98e9DA071CADe 

FA2083644C4064A238A0D5A9,247 

1290 DATA e520CC65A92420C165A9212eC165 

AeDFA9e52eCC65A903A00828C1653838A9809D 

44e3A96e9D4503A9549D4883,872 



PAGE 18 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



1380 DATA A9e29l>4903A90B2eCie53015A98C 

2eCie53eeEA8EBA9e520CC65A92e2eC165iee3 

4C8865A9ei8DeA83A9e88DeB,92e 

1310 DATA e38D8403A9638De5e3A9528D8283 

2e53E4ie834C8865AD8F638DFC64F7651957AD 

10e38DlA57ADeE63C902Feil , 94 

1320 DATA A2e5BDC2719D8971CA10F7A980A2 

7DD08FA2e5BDC8719D8971CA10F7A9e0A2FD8D 

e0578EC657A9578De283A957,874 

1330 DATA 8D85032053E43848ADQ4e318e988 

8D84e398e3EE0503EE0A83AD8Ae3C9e4D8E3A9 

D88D8A03A9828D0Be3AD8e57 , 658 

1348 DATA 8De883D883EE89e3A9888D83e3A9 

078Dee032859E438eCA287BDD5719DA471CAie 

F7e09848A90CA23028Cie568,174 

1358 DATA 85D4A98e85D528AAD928E6D8A0FF 

C8B1F338E92899AA71B1F318F3297F38E92099 

AA71A20eBDCE719DA271CAie, 653 

1360 DATA F7609D4203989D4A832056E4609D 

45e3989D44e3ee8844313A442A2E5359539B44 

313AS4454D582E544D589B44 , 491 

1370 DATA 313A54454D5e2E544D502C44F8e5 

4F6e4F532E5359539B707e7046246e5047326e 

504748665042007002020202,885 

1388 DATA e2028202e20202027e46A07141FF 

e5eoe00888e8AlAEAlACAFA78888eoeeoeEDE9 

E3F2EFE4EFF30000F8EC0e08 , 159 

1390 DATA OOOOE3F2E5ElF4EFF2808000800e 

00705F70888880Se8e888088A9AEB3A5B2B488 

A6AFB2ADA1B4B4A5A4888080, 249 

1480 DATA 8888888880888888808088888880 

8e80A4A9B3AB8088A9AEB4AF8e8e80888e808e 

888888808080888088888888,366 

1418 DATA 8088888eA4B2A9B6A58e8391888e 

888e8e808088888888808C78937888B3A5ACA5 

A3B48eC578DA7e342F802328,288 

1420 DATA 212E2725002429332B002432293e 

250e030C71127180B3B4AlB2B48e43715B7134 

2F003732293425882C2F2124 , 95 

1438 DATA 2532ee2F2E342Fe02429332B8871 

9F718e80888e808e8e8088B3A9AEA7ACA588A4 

A5AEB3A9B4B988888880888e,348 

1440 DATA 88888eC271DC71B3A9AEA7ACA5A4 

AFB5A2ACA5E5F2F2EFF28e8D8D00E4EFEEE588 

8DE002Eie2eo64eeooeo8ee8, 649 



CHECKSUM DATA, 

(see page 24) 

10 DATA 86,957,888,428,727,554,599,553 

,272,698,618,21,71,33,162,6579 

1800 DATA 150,494,623,985,327,634,750, 

709,550,783,722,881,236,198,955,8989 

1150 DATA 925,78,133,659,882,827,672,4 

79,724,742,221,915,921,875,599,9652 

1380 DATA 558,828,144,733,753,72,548,3 

71,526,734,417,583,334,597,47,7165 



DDEVIC 




tezee 




DUNIT 




*ez»i 




DCQMND 




(0302 




DSTATB 




»0303 




DBUFLO 




• 0304 




DBUFHI 




«030S 




DTIMLO 




»0306 




DBYTLD 




*030S 




DBYTHI 




*0309 




SAUXl 




«030A 




DAUX2 




«e30B 




RTCLKL 




»14 


I LOWER BYTE OF CLOCK 


SDUNDR 




»41 


SOUIET I/O FLAB 


SDMCTL 




*022F 


1 SHADOW SCREEN CONTROL REE. 


SDUSTL 




(0230 


1 CONTAINS DISPLAY LIST ADDR 


STICK0 




(0278 


(STICK SHADOW 


STRIBB 




(02B4 


ITRIB SHADOW 


COLORS 




(02C4 


1 COLOR SHADOW 


CHBBS 




(02F4 


I CHAR SET ADDR HI BYTE 


CHRORB 




(E000 


)0S CHAR BET ADDR 


CDNSOL 




(D01F 


(CONSOLE BUTTON RES 


HSCROL 




(D404 


IHORZ SCROLL REB 


VaCROL 




(D405 


lUERT SCROLL REB 


USYNC 




(D40A 


(CAUSES WAIT FDR WERT SYNC 


VCOUNT 




(D40B 


(VERT LINE COUNTER 


NMIEN 




(D40E 


(NMI ENABLE REB 


IFLOflTXNS POINT LOCATIONS 


FASC 


_ 


(DSE6 


(FLOAT->ABCII 


IFF 


* 


(D9AA 


( INT->FLDAT 


FRe 


■ 


(D4 


(FLOAT VARIBLE 


INBUFF 


n 


(F3 


(OUTPUT BUFFER PNTR 


( PROGRAM 


VARIBLES, CONSTANTS, 

AND ADDRESSES 


1 

1 





("BASE" IB THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN 
(THE ASSEMBLED ADDRESS AND THE RUN 
(ADDRESS. USED BECAUSE MICRODQS XL 
(WILL OCCUPY THE LOCATION OF DOS 
(DURINB OPERATION. 
( 



BASE 


- 


(S000 




LOADADR 




(0700 


[LOAD ADDR 


DIRTAB 




(0A00 


(DIRECTORY TBL 


DSPDAT 




(7000 


(DISPLAY DATA 


MASLN 




DSPDAT+330 (MABNIFIED LINE ADDR 


GTRTLN 




MASLN+4 


(START OF DIPLAY FILE NAMES 


BUFFER 




(0400 


1 INPUT BUFFER ADDR 


CH8ET 




(3108 


ICHARSET LOAD ADDR 


T0PD0S2 




(4000 


ILOMEM OF ATARI DOS 2 


TOPOSS 




(2000 


ILDMEM OF OSS DOS 


CHSTADR 




(3000 


I ADDR OF NEW CHARSET 


SECBUF 




(6300 


I TEMP SECTOR BUFFER 


DNSYFL 




(&30E 


IDISK DENSITY FLAG 


DOSLNK 




«>30F 


(LINKS TO DOS FILE 


[ZERO PABE VARIBLES 
( 


USED BY CREATOR 




«> 


(43 




FILNUM 


»a 


»+l 


l« FILES DISPLAYED 


MOVFL 


»- 


• +1 


1 SCROLLING FLAG 


MOVCNT 


»" 


• + 2 


(DATA ADDR INC 


INPFL 


»- 


»+l 


(INPUT ACCEPTED FLAG 


PROPTR 


»> 


• + l 


JPROBRAM SELECTION PNTR 


VSCRL 


»ai 


»+l 


(VSCRDL PNTR 


(ZERO PABE VARIBLES 1 


USED BY MICRODOS XL 




»B1 


(43 




ENDBUF 


Wm 


♦ +1 


(END OF BUFFER PNTR 


BFPNTR 


«> 


»+2 


(POINTS TO BUFFER 


MDVLOC 


»■■ 


• •4-2 


ITEMP START MOVE ADDR 


ENDPTR 
I 


*■ 


»+2 


ITEMP END MOVE ADDR 


(»•» PROSRAM 


START *<• 


(TURN OFF SCREEN 




' 


«> 


SDMCTL 




1 


.BYTE 




»" 


(3FC0 




(CLEAR MEMORY 




CLRMEM 


LDY 


*(40 




CLRl 


LDA 
TAX 


*0 




CLR2 


STA 
INX 


T0PD0S2 


,X 




BNE 


CLR2 






INC 


CLR2+2 






DEY 








BNE 


CLRl 






RTS 






( 


*m 


INITADR 






.WORD CLRMEM 


[SECTORS 


<H-3 (BOOT) 


AND »(2D0 



Listing 2. 
Assembly listing. 



I <M1CRODOB XL> BY WALT LORD (C> 

( 

I OPERATING SYSTEM CONSTANTS 



1 




AND ADDRESSES 


ICCDM 


« 


(0342 


iI/0 COMMAND 


ICBADR 


m 


(0344 


(BUFFER ADDR 


ICBLEN 


K 


(0348 


(BUFFER LENGTH 


ICAUXl 


- 


(034A 


[AUX 1 


(VECTOR 


TABLE 




DBKINW 


_ 


(E4S3 


(DISK HANDLER 


CIDV 


m 


(E4S6 


(CIO HANDLER 


SIOV 


B 


(E459 


[BID HANDLER 


SETVBV 


B 


(E4SC 


[SET VBI ADDRESS 


XITVBV 


o; 


(E4&2 


(EXIT VBI 


UARMSV 


m 


(E474 


[WARM START 


COLDSV 


m 


(E477 


[COLD START 


DDSVEC 


m 


(0A 


[RUN DOS 


INITADR 


B 


(B2E2 


[DOS LDAD/INIT 


BQADR 


■e 


(02E0 


(DOS LOAD/GO 


VDSLBT 


= 


(0200 


(DISPLAY LIST NMI 



RESET 
( 

RSTFLG 



(**» GET 
( 

8ETFILE 



*- LOADADR-tBASE 

»-BASE [• BYTES/SECTOR 
.BYTE (80 

.BYTE 3 [LOAD 3 SECTORS 
.WORD LOADADR [LOAD ADDR 
.WORD SETVEC (INIT ADDR 

LDA tt <BETFILE (SET DOSVEC 

ETA DDSVEC [TO BETFILC 

LDA tt >GETFILE 

STA DDSVEC-H 

LDA RSTFLG (DOS RUNNING? 

BED RESET (YES, BRANCH 

CLC 

RTS 

JMP COLDSV [RESET PRESSED, RE-BOOT 



-BABE 

1 
-BASE 



ISIO COMMAND BLOCK (DCB) 



.BYTE 

B » 

.WORD 

FILE ROUTINE 

•-BASE 

LDA SECL8 

STA DBYTLO 

BNE CONT0 

INC DBYTHI 

LDA »0 

STA RSTFLG 

STA SDUNDR 



( DOS RUN FLAG 
I SECTOR LINK TO 



( SET TO CORRECT 
(DENSITY FOR READ 



(SET TO DOS RUNNING 
(QUIET LOAD 



SUPERPRINTER 
PACKAGES 

Gemini 10X and 

U-Print A 319.00 

Gemini 10X and 

Apeface XLPS 319.00 
Panasonic 1091 and 

U-Print A 364.00 

Panasonic 1090 and 

U-Print A 279.00 

Legend 880 and 

U-Print A 309.00 

Prowriter and 

U-Print A 385.00 

No additional ship, charges on 
printer pacl<ages in Cent. USA 



Bring the trivia craze home 
with P.O. The Party Quiz 
Game for the Atari 800 & 
800XL (disk oniy) 49.95 



A ATARI 



ATARI isatrademarl<of ATARI, INC. 



Atari Inc. has cut all 
hardware and soft- 
ware prices. Please 
call for latest prices!! 



PRINTERS 

Axiom AT-550 . . 
Epson. 



279.00 
. . . Call 

Prowriter 1 309.00 

Riteman Call 

Silver Reed Call 

Toshiba 1340 Call 

Toshiba 1351 Call 

Silver Reed Call 

Legend 880 239.00 

Panosonic 1090.219.00 
Panosonic 1091 . 285.00 



.IL 



micronics-inc 

T>1E POWER BEHIND THE PfllffTED WORD. 



Gemini 10X . . 245 
Gemini 15X . . 389 
Delta 1 0X .... 339 
Delta 15X. ...499 
Radix 1 0X... .549 
Radix 15X... .629 
Powertype 329 

^Call for prices on joysticks, printer cables, blank floppy disks, and other computer 
ATARI S O F T W A 



ATARI MODEM 
SPECIAL 

Hayes 300 & 

R-Verter 239.00 

Hayes 1200 & 

R-Verter Call 

No additional shipping for Modem 
pacltages in Cont. USA 



MOSAIC 

48K RAM 99.00 

64K RAM/400 . . 149.00 
64K RAM/800 + 

Cable Kit #1.. 169.00 
64K Expander for 

600 XL 99.95 



DISK DRIVES 

Indus GT Call 

Percom Call 

Astra 2001 Call 

MODEMS 

Hayes Amart 

Modem 300 Call 

Mark II 79.00 

Mark Vll/Auto Ans/ 

Auto Dial Call 

Mark XII/1 200 Baud. .Call 

MPP 1000 C Call 

R-Verter Modem 

Adaptor 39.95 

INTERFACES 

Aid interfast I Call 

Ape Face XLPS Call 

R-Verter Modem 

Adaptor 39.95 

MPP 1150 Call 

U-Print A Call 

accessories. -M- 

R E 

SPINNAKER (cont'd.) 

Delta Drawing-Cart 22.95 

Pacemaker-Can 22.96 

Fraction Fever -Cart 22.95 

Grandma's House-D 19.95 

Kids on Keys -Cart 22.95 

KIndercomp-Cart 22.95 

Searcti/ Amazing Thing-D. 22.95 

Snooper 'l-D 22.95 

Snooper •2-D 22.95 

Stoiv Mactilne-Carl 22.95 

Trains-D 22.95 

SSI 

Carrier Force -D 41.95 

Combat Leader-D/T 27.95 

Cosmic Balance II -D 27.95 

Cosmic Balance ■ D 27.95 

Broodsides-D 27.95 

War in Russia -D 55.95 

50 Mission Crush -D 27.95 

Questron-D 34.95 

Ralls West-D 27,95 

Bomb Alley-D 41.95 

Computer Ambush -D 41.95 

Galoctic Adventures -D 41.95 

Computer Baseball -D .... 27.95 

Reforger 88-D 41.95 

Oblectlve Kursk -D 27.95 

Breokthrough /Ardennes / D 41.95 

Field of FIre-D 27.95 

Imperial Goloctium-D .... 27.95 

SYNAPSE 

Air Suppon-D/T 23.95 

Alley Cat-D/T 16.95 

Blue Max-D/T 23.95 

Dimension X-D/T 23.95 

Drelbs-D/T 23.95 

Eleclrician-D/T 23.95 

Encounter-D/T 16.95 

Fort Apocalypse -D/T 23.95 

Necromancer- D/T 23.95 

NeviiYorkClly-D/T 23.95 

Pharoah's Curse -D/T .... 23.95 

Quoslmodo-D/T 23.95 

Rainbow Walker-D/T..,. 23.95 
Relax Stress Reduction Sys. . 79.95 

Shamus Case ll-D/T 23.95 

2epplln-D/T 23.95 

Synfile-D 34.95 

Syncalc-D 34.95 

Syntrend-D 34.95 

Synchron-D 27.95 

Syncomm-D 27.95 

Synstock-D 27.95 

D-Dlsk T-Cassette 
Cart-Cartridge 



ACCESSORIES 

Ape-Link 29.95 

Gemini lOX 8K Upgrade .... Coll 

Koala Pod-D 69.95 

Kooia Pad-Cart 74.95 

Humpty Dump-D 29.95 

Monitors Coll 

CompuServe Starter 27.95 

Vidtex 29.95 

EIS Subscription Kit 64.95 

Analog Compendium 9.95 

Atari Assembler 14.95 

Compute's Machine 

Lang/Beg 12.95 

Inside Atari Dos 19.95 

Mapping the Atari 14.95 

Compute's 1st- 3rd Books 

Atari-EA 12.95 

Printer Stand 15.95 

Omnlmon 82.95 

Omnivlew 80 3995 

Printer Ribbons Call 

Ramrod XL Call 

WICO Joysticks Coll 

MPP 64K Printer Buffer Call 

U-Prinf 16, 32, or 64K Buffer. Call 

TAG III Joystick 12.95 

Starfighter Joystick 9.95 

Ramrod XL 99.95 

Muppet Keys (XL Only)-D . 54.95 

ACTIVISION 

Decdtholon-Cart 29.95 

Beamrlder-Cort 29.95 

Hero-Can 29.95 

Pitfall ll-Cart 29.95 

River Raid-Can 29.95 

Designer Pencil -Cart 29.95 

Spoce Stiuftle- 29.95 

Lone Ranger -Can 29.95 

Zenji-Cart 29,96 

AVALON HILL 

Coll for items and prices 

BRODERBUND 

Bank street Writer -D 49.96 

Loderunner-D 23.96 

Mask of the Sun-D 27,95 

Operation Whirlwind -D , . , 27,95 

Spelunker-D 20,95 

Stellh-D 20.95 

Whistler's Brother 20,96 

Print Shop-D 34.96 

Serpent's Sfor-D 27.95 

CBS SOFTWARE 

Call for items and prices 



.^^-N^ 



# 



^^><?J^ 



K^ 



.^^ 



c 



DATASOFT 

Bruce Lee-D/T 27.95 

Micropoinfer-D 23.95 

LostTomb-D/T 23,95 

Letter Wizard + Spell -D. ,54.95 
Conan the Borborian-D/T. 27.95 

Mr Do-D/T 27.95 

Dig Dug -D 20.95 

Pole Position -D 20.95 

Pacmon-D 20.95 

DISKETTES 

Dyson Call 

Verbatim For 

Certron 10 pak 

Elephant & 

Maxell Quantity 

Memorex Pricing. 

Ultra Magnetics 

BASF 

Wabash 

ELECTRONIC ARTS 

Arohon-D 2995 

Pintiall Construction -D.... 29.95 

M.U.LE.-D 29.96 

Murder/Zindemeuf-D . ,., 29.95 

One on One- D 29.95 

Archon ll-D 29.95 

Financial Cookbook - D , . , , 37,95 

Music Construction -D 29,95 

Realm/ Impossibility -D ,,. 29,95 
Hord Hat Mack-D 29,95 

EPYX 

Call for items and prices 

INFOCOM 

Deadllne-D 29.95 

Enchanler-D 23.96 

Infldel-D 29.96 

Planeffoll-D 24.95 

Sorcerer-D 2995 

Starcross-D 29.96 

Suspended-D 29.95 

Wifness-D 29.96 

Sea Stalker-D 24.96 

Cutfhroofs-D 24,95 

Suspect-D 24,95 

HItchlker-D 24,96 

Zork l-D 24,95 

Zork II or lll-D 27.95 

MINDSCAPE 

Coll for Items and prices 



MICROPROSE 

Chopper Rescue-D/T 23,95 

Floyd/Jungle-D/T 23,95 

Hellcat Ace-D/T 23,95 

MIg Alley Ace-D/T 23,95 

NATO Commander-D/T , . 23,95 

SoloFllght-D/T 23,95 

Spitfire Ace-D/T 23,95 

WIngmon-D/T 23,95 

Air Rescue l-D/T 23,95 

Challenger -D/T 23.95 

F-16 Strike Eagle-D/T. ,,, 23.95 

MISCELLANEOUS ATARI 

DIskey-D 34.95 

Ultra Disassembler -D 34,96 

Codewriter-D 3995 

Star League Baseball D/T 23,95 
Star Bowl Footboll-D/T,., 23,95 

Master Type ■ D / Cart 27,95 

Flight Simulator ll-D 37,95 

S,A,M,-D 41.95 

Castle Wolfensteln-D 20.95 

CompuServe Starter Kil 27.95 

Home Accountant-D 49.95 

Megafont ll-D 19.95 

Monkey Wrench II -C 37.95 

Movie Maker-D 37,95 

Ultima lll-D 41,95 

Jupiter Mission -D 34.95 

Boulder Dosh-D/T 20.95 

Scraper Caper - Con 34.95 

Miner 2049'er-Can 34.95 

Spy Hunter-Corf/D 29.95 

Tapper-Cart/D 2995 

Up 'N Down-Cart/D 29.95 

Beach Landing -D 27.95 

PicBullder-D 27.95 

Astrochdse-D 20,95 

Flip-Flop-D/T 20.95 

Sargon ll-D/T 16.95 

Odesta Chess -D 49.95 

Mllllonolre-D 27.95 

Spy vs. Spy-D 23.95 

Adventure Writer-D 27.96 

MMG Basic Compller-D. . .69.96 

Summer Gomes-D 27.95 

Pitstop ll-D 27.95 

Gateway to Apshai-Cort . . 27.95 
Montezumo's Revenge-D. ,27,96 

Dragon/Pern -D 27,95 

Adventure Master- D 34,95 

Get Rich Series -D 34.95 



MISC. ATARI (cont'd.) 

MPP Modem Driver -D 19,95 

MIcrofller-Cart 34.95 

f^icrocheck-D 34,95 

Mr Do's Cosfle-Cort 34.95 

Frogger ll-Cart 34.95 

Net Worth-D 64.95 

Stickybeor-D 27,95 

Windham Closslcs-D 19,95 

Omnitrend Unlverse-D , . , . 69,95 

Space Beagle -D 23.95 

Adventure WrIter-D 41.95 

Beochheod-D 23.95 

Letter Pertect / Spell - D. . ..74.95 
Harcourt / Bruce S.A.T. - . . . 5995 
S.A.G.E. Graphics Editor-D 39.95 

StNp Poker-D 23.95 

Mlllionalre-D 27,95 

Scroll of Abodon-D 23,95 

Ultimo IV-n 41.95 

Rdid Over ,/oscow-S 27,95 

Micro-League Baseball-D , 29,95 

Paper Clip-D Call 

HomePak-D 37,95 

Ultimo ll-D 41.96 

OPTIMIZED SYSTEMS 

Actlon-Cort 6996 

Bosic XL-Cart 69.95 

MAC/65-Can 69.95 

MAC/65 Tool Klf-D 27.96 

Action Tool KIt-D 27.95 

DOS XL-D 27.95 

Action Aid-D 27.95 

C65-D 59.95 

Hdhdy-Writer-D Coll 

Postal Tool-D 41.95 

Print Tool-D 41.95 

SCHOLASTIC 

Coll for Items and prices 

SCREENPLAY 

Call for Items and prices 

SEGA 

Call for Items and prices 

SIERRA ON-LINE 

Call tor Items and prtces 

SPINNAKER 

Adventure Creator- D 22.95 

Aeroblcs-D 27.95 

All In the Color Caves -C . . 22,96 
Alphabet Zoo -Cart 22.96 



To Order Call Toll Free 



For Technical Info, Order 
Inquiries, or for Wise. Orders ■ 



800-558-0003 41 4-351-2007 



% 



,y; s?)iyjir,ii' ■•i;;i,// 



'[■•(7.' 



iaSln> 



'"^l;;i WQte^.^ 



±_J 



ORDERING INFORMATION. Please specify system For last delivery send cashier s check, money order or direct bank tiansfers Personal and 
company checks allow 2 weeks to clear. Charges for COD are S3,00, School Purchase Orders welcome. In CONTINENTAL USA, include $3,00 
shipping per software order. Include 3% shipping on all Hardware orders, minimum $3,00. Mastercard & Visa please include card # and expiration 
date. Wl residents please add 5% sales tax. HI, AK, FRO, ARC, Canadian orders — add 5% shipping, minimum $5.00. All other foreign orders, 
please add 15% shipping, minimum $10.00. All goods are new and include factory warranty. Due to our low prices, all sales are final. All defective 
returns must have a return authorization number. Please call 414-351-2007 to obtain an RA# or your return will NOT be accepted for replacement 
or repair. Prices and availability are subject to change without notice. 



COMPUTABILITY 

P.O, Box 17882 

Milwaukee, Wl 53217 

ORDER LINES OPEN 
Mon-Fri 11 AM - 7 PM CST 
Sat 12 PM -5 PM CST 



CIRCLE #106 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



A 



A 



Vastly SUPERIOR to any translation programs 
availablel FOR ATARI 
1200XL/600XL/800XL with 64K. 
ATAIPj " (Please specify computer model number!) ATARI" 

$69.95 (Rom) Tuc $69.95 (Rom) 

$49.95 (D ore) '"^ $49.95 (D ore) 

XL "FIX"! ^ 



The Atari XL series computers represent power, sophistication, and 

flexibllltv virtually unrivalled in todays Home Computer Market, 
With "approximately" 30-40% of existing software being "Incom- 
potabie", a real, and serious problem exists. Because of this we 

have developed THE XL "FIX"! 

ADVANTAGES over cheaper "translation products": 

1 The XL "FIX"! Is capable of fixing more software ... an estimated 
30% more software! 

2. The XL "FIX"! Is available In DISK, CASSEHE, and now ROM! 

3. XL "FIX"! versions fix ALL THREE types of software (Disk - Cassette - 
and Cartridges!) 

4. The XL "FIX"! (disk or cassette) adds OVER 4K of usable RAM to your 
computer (anyone using Data bases or Word processors will really 
appreciate this feature!) 

5. Vou never have to hold the OPTION button down on 600XL or 
800XL computers! 

6. VERY IMPORTANT! You need to load the XL "FIX"! only once ... you 
can change disks, cassettes, or cartridges without rebooting the XL 
"FIX"! each time (disk or cassette)! 

7. The ROM version is Instantaneous upon computer power up, has a 
high speed cursor, is instantly switchable to your original operating 
system, will work with 16K 600XL's, and more! 

The XL "FIX"! .... another SUPERIOR product! 64K required! 
DISTRIBUTOR/DEALER inquires welcome 



Mastercard-Visa-Money 
Order or Cashier Check. 
Phone (716) 467-9326 

Please specify computer 
model number! 



Send $49,95 ($69.95 for Rom) 
plus $4 shipping and handling 
(N.Y.S, residents please add 7%) to: 
COMPUTER SOFTWARE SERVICES 
P.O. Box 17660 
Rochester, New York 14617 



A 

ATARI 

ONLY 

$49.95 



PROTECT your DISK programs and 
files BEFORE lending them out! 

THE 

"PROTECTOR" r^ 



A 

ATARI 

ONLY 

$49.95 



Includes hardware and software! The "PROTECTOR" 
produces a true BAD SECTOR GENERATOR which will allow you 
to create BAD SECTORS wherever you wish (approximately 10 
per second!). You'll never have to fool with ridiculous speed 
adjustment or tape jerking schemes again! Simple do it 
yourself installation requires 15 to 20 minutes! 

The DISK software is the most versatile that we've ever seen 
and it's lightning FAST! Allows you to move and rearrange data 
anywhere on the disk, scrambles directories making them un- 
accesslbie to others, and offers INSTANT mapping of file disks 
(requires one second for ENTIRE disk!). Simple operation. 

All these features are done from a 720 sector FULL VIEW 
map for total operator viewing and simplicity! 



Multiple drives 
Digitial SECTOR indicator 
Directory scrambler 
Moves/arranges data 
Selectoble read/write 
Selectable start/end 
Hex conversion 
Disk Duping 



Disk mapping 
Instant map 
Compaction 
Fast formating 
Auto-formating 
Bad sector memory 
Instant restart 
Multiple copy function 



DEAUR/DISTRIBUTOR INQUIRIES WELCOME! 

Our other fine products include 
THE "PiU" and THE "SILfNCER". 



Send $49.95 plus $4 shipping 
and handling (N.Y.S, resi- 
dents odd 7% soles tax) to: 
COMPUTER SOFTWARE 
SERVICES 
P.O. Box 17660 
Rochester, New Yorit 14621 
Phone Order: 
(716) 467-9326 



Mostercard-Visa-Money 
Orders or Bank Checks. Atari 
is TM of Atari Inc. The 
"PROTECTOR" is a TM of 
COMPUTER SOFTWARE 
SERVICES (division of S.C.S.D., 
Inc.) 100% WARRANTY 
(replacement only - no 
refund policy.) 



A 

A-TA ni . For years they said it couldn't be done . 

ONLY 

$149.95 



THE 

"IMPOSSIBLE"! 



they claimed! 



A 

ATARI " 



ONIV 



Backup aimost any disk currently available (even heavily protected programs) with an UNMODIFIED disk drive! $149.95 

Works with ANY disk drive! 

PURPOSE: The "IMPOSSIBLE" was deveioped in response to the estimated half million disk drive users that own a drive other than the Atari 810 (Indus, Per- 
com, Trak, Rana, Astra, etc.) that wish to BACK UP their protected software. Due to a radically newtechnology developed by Computer Software Ser- 
vices, modification to your disk drive has been eliminated! The advantages are obvious! Drive warranties are not violated, the chance occidental 
damage has been eliminated, etc., etc. 

OPERATION: The "IMPOSSIBLE"! consists of a disk program (unprotected so you can moke as many backups as you wish) and a 4K STATIC RAM pock 
which is inserted lntoyourcomputer(nosoldering!)The"IMPOSSIBLE"! will readyourprogramdiskand then re-write it in an unprotected formal! You may 
make additional backup copies using a sector copier or even regular DOS! Because your backup copy no longer has BAD SECTORSor EXOTIC FORMATS, 
the program data can now be manipulated into DOS compofabie files (even double density!), tronsfered to cassette, etc. (with the aid of our Satellite 
programs!) No user programming knowledge required. A few programs require logical thinking. 



FEATURES: 1, Backup protected disks 

2. Handles most MULTI-LOAD programs 

3. Mokes DOS files (with Satellite option) 

4. Up to 90K data Input capable 
PROJECTED SATELLITES: A "COMPACTOR" program which wi 



5. AFSD-Automatic FUZZY Sector Discriminator 

6. Expands computer memory to 52K usable 

7. Simple NO SOLDER installation 

8. Satellite expandable 
convert your program into DOS compatable files (double density compatable!) for the 

storage of several programs on one disk. A "COLUMN 80" program for Word Proccessing, etc. It allows 80 columns on the screen! The "XL-MATE" will allow 
programs made with your 400/800 "IMPOSSIBLE"! to now play on your XLComputer! The METAMORPHOSES II program will allowyou to convert your pro- 
tected CASSETTES into disk DOS files and vice-versa. All satellite programs must be used with inconjunction with The "IMPOSSIBLE"! 
REQUIREMENTS: The "IMPOSSIBLE" diskette, the 4K STATIC RAM pack, a 400 or 800 computer (please specify!) with 48K and "B" Rom's. NOTE! The very old 
ATAR! computers were shipped with "A" Rom's which had some serious "Bugs". Even if you don't own an "IMPOSSIBLE," you should upgrade to "B" Rom's 
(simple to install!) We hove them available at a veiy inexpensive price. CALL US! "XL" version available soon! 

NOT A PIRATING TOOL: We at C.S.S. did not design The "IMPOSSIBLE"! to put Software Manufactures out-of-business overnight! Nearly all of our products 
hove been "ripped-off" by industry parasite who have little or no ability to develop a product of their own so we can sympathize with their dilemma. All 
C.S.S. products have built-in safe guards which prohibit their use for flagrant pirating. The "IMPOSSIBLE"! is no exception! While The "IMPOSSIBLE"! back- 
up the most heavily protected programs, it also checks to see that the 4K STATIC RAM pack is installed before allowing the backup copy to 
execute! 

EXAMPLES: The "IMPOSSIBLE"! has been tested on 300 of the most pop- 
ular and heavily protected programs we could find. With nearly 4000 
programs for Atari, we DO NOT guarantee that it will backup all pro- 
grams in the past-present-and future! We will supply updates at $6 each 
(non-profit!) if and when necessary. Programs we have successfully 
backed up Include: Blue Max, Visi-cal, Archon, Mule, File Manager 800 
+, Syn Cole, Syn File, One on One, 7 Cities of Gold, Super Bunny, Load 
Runner, Drol, and Gumball iust to name a few! 



Mastercard- Visa-Money 
Orders or Cashier Check. 
Phone:(716)467-9326 

Please specify computer 
model number! 



Send $149.95 plus 

$4 shipping and handling 

(N.Y.S. residents please add 7%) 

COMPUTER SOFIWARE SERVICES 
P.O. BOX 17660 
ROCHESTER, N.Y. 14617 



CIRCLE #107 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 21 



1 SETUP DCB 




STft 


DBUFLO 


BTA 


BFPNTR 


LDA 


» >BUFFER 


STA 


DBUFHI 


BTA 


BFPNTR+l 


LDA 


8ECLNK 


BTA 


DAUXl 


LDA 


SECLNK+l 


STA 


DAUX2 


LDA 


»»31 


STA 


DDEVIC 


LDA 


*1 


BTA 


DUNIT 


LDA 


»' R 


STA 


DCOMND 


JER 


PREFILL IPRE-FILL BUFFER 


LDA 


BUFFER'1'2 1 STORE LOAD ADOR 


BTA 


BOADR IFOR 30 ADDR 


LDA 


BUFFER+3 


BTA 


BQADR+1 


J5R 


RTRNST ISET INITADR TO "RT8 


IBET LOAD ADDRESS ROUTINE 


BETADR 


*-BA8E 


LDX 


ute 


LDA 


(BFPNTR) ,Y 


CMP 


• «FF 


BNE 


MOVADR 


JSR 


INCPTR 


LDA 


(BFPNTR) ,Y 


CMP 


• »FF 


BNE 


CONTl 


JSR 


INCPTR 


JMP 


MOVADR-BASE 


CONTl LDA 


• «FF 


STA 


MOVLOC 


INX 




■MOVE LOAD ADDRESS INTO PRDBRAM 


MOVADR LDA 


(BFPNTR) .Y 


BTA 


MOVLOC, X 


JSR 


INCPTR 


INX 




CPX 


*4 


BNE 


MOVADR 


LDA 


MOVLOC 


STA 


MOVPTR 


LDA 


MOVLOC+1 


STA 
'move DATA 


MOVPTR+1 




MOVER LDA 


BUFFER.Y 


MOVPTR 


o-t-l-BAfiE 



STA »FFFF 
JSR INCPTR 
LDA MDVPTR+1 
CMP ENDPTR+l 
BCB TSTADR 
INC MOVPTR 
BNE MOVER 
INC MOVPTR+1 
BNE MOVER 
LDA MOVPTR 
CMP ENDPTR 
BCC C0NT4 
JSR JPINIT 
JMP SETADR 



lEND OF SUBFILE, INITIALIZE 
ISET NEXT SUBFILE 



■ROUTINE TO INCREMENT THE Y REG. 
I IF END OF BUFFER, FILL BUFFER 



INCPTR 


INY 


•-BASE 






CPY 


ENDBUF 






BCB 


FLLBUF 




_ 


RTS 






BUFFLEN 


m 


» + l 


l»BYTEB/BECTOR - 3 


FLLBUF 


LDY 


*»7D 


(GET SECTOR LINKS 




LDA 


(BFPNTR) 


,Y 




AND 


1)3 






BTA 


DAUX2 






INY 








LDA 


(BFPNTR) 


,Y 




BTA 


DAUXl 






ORA 


DAUX2 






BED 


RUNIT 


I EOF? JUMP THRU BOADR 


PREFILL 


TXA 
PHA 


»-BASE 




CDNTS 


JSR 


BETSEC 


IBET SECTOR 




BMI 


CONTS 


lERRDR, TRY ASAIN 




LDY 


SECL8 


IQET » BYTES IN SECTOR 




DEY 








LDA 


(BFPNTR) 


,Y 




STA 


ENDBUF 


(STORE IN END OF BUFFER PNTR 




PLA 








TAX 








LDY 


»e 






RTB 






IBET SECTOR ROUTINE 




QETSEC 


■ 


»-BASE 






LDA 


l)*40 






STA 


DSTATS 






LDA 


»7 






STA 


DTIMLO 






JMP 


SIOV 




IJUMP THRU INIT ADDRESS 


JPINIT 


TYA 
PHA 


»-BAEE 






JSR 


JINI 






PLA 








TAY 






1 RESET 


INIT ADDRESS TO "RTS" 


RTRNST 


. 


»-BASE 






LDA 


» <RTRN 






STA 


INITADR 






LDA 


• >tRTRN 


-BASE] 




STA 


IN1TADR+ 


1 


RTRN 


RTS 






JINI 


« 


.-BABE 






JMP 


(INITADR) 



RUNIT 


JSR 


JINI 






JMP 


(BOADR) 




■»•» MAINLINE »»» 




MAINLN 


_ 


»-BASE 






LDA 


»»FF 


1 INIT » OF FILES 




STA 


FILNUM 






LDA 


• *69 


ISET UP DCB 




STA 


DAUXl 






LDA 


»1 






STA 


DAUX2 






LDA 


• >BUFFER 




STA 


DBUFHI 






LDA 


•e 






STA 


DBUFLO 






STA 


ENDPTR 


IBET DIRECTORY 




LDA 


« >DIRTAB ITABLE PNTR 




STA 


ENDPTR+l 






LDA 


» <8TRTLN ISET SCREEN PNTR 




STA 


MDVLOC 






LDA 


» >8TRTLN 




STA 


MOVLOC+1 




CONTIB 


JSR 


BETSEC 


IBET SECTOR 




BMI 


ENDDIR 


1 ERROR, BQTD END 




INC 


DAUXl 


1 INCREMENT SECTOR • 




LDX 


*B 


1 RESET BUFFER PNTR 




BTX 


BFPNTR 




CONTll 


LDY 


*CI 






LDA 


(BFPNTR) 


,Y 




BEQ 


ENDDIR 


{zero? END. 




BMI 


NEXDIR 


1 IF - THEN LOCKED 




AND 


*»20 


1 IF NOT LOCKED NEXT 




BED 


NEXDIR 


IDIRECTORY 




INC 


FILNUM 


1 FOUND, INC COUNT 




LDY 


*3 




CONTiei 


LDA 


(BFPNTR) 


,Y 1 STORE SECTOR PNTR8 




STA 


(ENDPTR. 


ki 




INC 


ENDPTR 






INY 








CPY 


•S 






BNE 


CONT101 




C0NT12 


LDA 
SEC 


(BFPNTR) 


,Y 1 DISPLAY NAME 




SBC 


• *2II 


1 CONVERT TO SCREEN DATA 




STA 


(MOVLOC, 


X) 




INC 


MOVLOC 






BNE 


C0NT13 






INC 


MQVLOC+1 




C0NT13 


INY 








CPY 


t«10 






BNE 


CONTl 2 






LDA 


MOVLOC 


IINC TO NEXT LINE 




CLC 








ADC 


•29 






STA 


MOVLOC 






BCC 


NEXDIR 






INC 


MOVLOC+1 




NEXDIR 


LDA 
CLC 


BFPNTR 


ISET UP FOR NEXT DIRECTORY 




ADC 


• •IS 






STA 


BFPNTR 






CMP 


BECLO 






BED 


CONT10 


lEND OF SECTOR 




BNE 


CONTl 1 


INOT END, CONTINUE 


ENDDIR 


LDA 


NEMCOL. Y 


1 STORE NEW COLORS 




STA 


COLORS ;y 






DEY 








BNE 


ENDDIR 






LDA 


» <DSPLST 1 STORE NEW DL 




STA 


8DLSTL 






LDA 


* >DSPLST 




STA 


8DLSTL+1 






LDA 


» <DSPLI 


IPOINT TO DLI 




STA 


VDSLBT 






LDA 


tt >DSPLI 






STA 


VDBLST+1 






LDA 


»*30 


ISET TO NEW 




STA 


CHBAS 


I CHARACTER SET 




LDA 


»*F0 


I TURN ON DLI 




ETA 


NMIEN 






LDA 


me 


I CLEAR FLAGS 




STA 


MOVFL 






STA 


INPFL 






STA 


PROPTR 






LDA 


»9 


ISET VSCROL 




STA 


VSCROL 






LDA 


FILNUM 


I ANY LOCKED FILES? 




BED 


CQNT14 


I NO, BRANCH 




LDY 


W <VBI 


1 INSTALL DEFERRED V8I 




LDX 


* >VBI 






LDA 


• 7 






JSR 


EETVBV 




CQNT14 


LDA 


• »21 


ISET SCREEN TO NARROW 




BTA 


SDMCTL 




BETINPT 


LDA 


INPFL 


IWAIT FOR INPUT 




BED 


QETINPT 


ITHRU DEF. VBI 




LDA 


PROPTR 


ISET FILE PNTR 




ASL 


A 


IMULTIPLY • 2 




TAX 








LDA 


DIRTAB.X 


IPOINT INTO DIRECTORY 




STA 


SECLNK 


ITABLE AND STORE 




LDA 


DIRTAB+1 


,X 1 SECTOR LINKS 




STA 


SECLNK+1 






LDA 


• 






TAX 








LDY 


»*A0 




LOOPS 


STA 
INX 


TOPOSa,X 






BNE 


LOOPS 






INC 


LOOPS+2 






DEY 








BNE 


LOOPS 






INC 


R8TFLQ 


IBET TO DOS DONE 




JMP 


WARMSV 


IWARM START 



I "DOB. SYS" FILE 
I 

»- *600e 

.BYTE »FF,»FF 1 BINARY LOAD HEADER 

.WORD SDMCTL, SDMCTL 

.BYTE ITURN OFF SCREEN 

.WORD MOVCHS,ENDDQS 
I 

I*** MOVE O.S. CHARACTER SET •*» 
I 



•INITIALIZE THEN RUN 



MOVCHS 


LDX 


«0 


Mva 


LDA 


CHRORB, X 




STA 


CHSTADR, X 




INX 






BNE 


MV0 




INC 


MV0 + 5 




INC 


MV0 + 2 




LDA 


MV0 + 2 




CMP 


• »E2 I TOP OF UPPER CASE? 




BNE 


MVB INO, CONTINUE 
1 RETURN 




RTS 



PAGE 22 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



!»•» DEFERED 
I 

VBI LDA 
BNE 
LDft 
ROR 
ROR 
BCC 
ROR 
BCC 
LDA 
ROR 
BCC 
ROR 
BCC 
LDY 
BED 
LDft 
ROR 
BCS 

I 

■SELECTION I! 

I 

FOUND INC 
BNE 

I 

I SCROLL UP 



MOVFL 

CONTMV 

CONSOL 

A 

A 

DOMN 

A 

UP 

STICKB 

A 

UP 

A 

DOWN 

8TRIB0 

FOUND 

CONSOL 

A 

EXIT 



INPFL 
EXIT 



UP 



LDA PROPTR 
CMP FILNUM 
BCB EXIT 
INC PROPTR 
LDX *40 
LDY »0 
TYA 
BEQ SETHOV 



■SCROLL DOWN 



LDA PROPTR 
BEQ EXIT 
DEC PROPTR 
LDX »-40 
LDY •♦FF 
LDA tttBA 



ISCROLLINS? 
■YES. CONTINUE 
■READ CONSOL 



■SELECT PRESSED? 

■OPTION PRESSED 
■READ STICKe 

■ UP7 

■ DOWN"? 

■STICK TRIBSER 
■PRESSED? 
■START PRESSED? 

■NOTHING EXIT 



■SET FLAG 
■ EXIT 



■END OF PROBRAMS? 



■NO, INC POINTER 
■ INC DSPDAT BY 40 

■SCROLL UP VALUES 



■TOP OF PROGRAMS 
■YES, EXIT 
■DEC POINTER 
■INC DSPDAT BY -4B 

■SCROLL DOWN VALUES 



■ 



.SBYTE +»BB,"down" 
.SBYTE " " 
.SBYTE +»8B ••fir«" 
.SBYTE " " 



■DISPLAY LIST INTERRUPT 

■ 

DSPLI PHA 

LDA VCOUNT 

CHP •&4 

BCS Dl 

LDA »4 

BNE D2 



IVC0UNT>-44 

I YES. 

•SET HSCRDL TO 4 



I 

Dl 



I 

■NEW COLORS 

I 

NEWCOL 

ENDDOS 

■ 



LDA NEWCOL 
STA *D019 
LDA *2 
STA WSYNC 
STA HSCROL 
PLA 
RTI 



■STORE FOOTER COLOR 
I IN REGISTER 
■SET HSCRDL TO 2 
I- WSYNC - 



.BYTE «<i8,*0D,«aS,«2a 
.BYTE $BB 

.WORD INITADR, INITADR+l 
.WORD M0VCH8 



• 
I 

I CUSTOM CHARACTER SET 

I 

.WORD CHSET,CHBET+«CE 

I 

CHR8ET .BYTE 43, SI , SI , 127, I IS, 1 IS, 1 15, B 

.BYTE 12&, 102, Ib2, 127, 103, 1B3, l27,0 
.BYTE 127,103, 103, 9i, 99, 99, 127,0 
.BYTE 12&, 102, 102, 119, 119, 119, 127,0 
.BYTE 127, 9i, 94, 127, ll 2, 112,127,0 
-BYTE 127,96,94, 127, 112, 112, 112, f 
-BYTE 127; 991 96, 11 1,1 03! 103,127,- 




I 

■STORE VALUES START SCROLL 

I 

STA VSCRL 

STX MOVCNT 

STY MOVCNT+1 

LDA »0 (CLICK SPEAKER 

STA CONSOL 

INC MOVFL (SET MOVE FLAG 

LDX VSCRL ■GET NEXT VSCROL 

LDA 8CRVAL,X ■VALUE 

BMI INCD8P INEG7 INC DSPDAT 

INC VSCRL — 

STA VSCROL 
CMP #9 



Ibyte 4B.4e,46, iii, iii, iii,i2li,B 



8ETM0V 



CONTMV 



STORE 



IBi 
103 
127 
127 
127 
126 
127 



I 



BCC EXIT 
LDA KB 
STA MOVFL 



■POINT TD NEXT VALUE 

■STORE INTO VSCROL 

■EQUALS 97 

■NO, EXIT 

■SET DONE SCROLL 



l47, I27, ll9, lB3,l03, 1b3,0 
119. 127, 111, 103,1 03. 1B3,B 
99,99, 103, 103, 103, 127,0 
99,99, 127,112,112,112,0 
99,99,103, 103,103, 127:7 
102, 102, 127, 119, 119, 119,0 
94, 127, J, 115, lis, 127,0 
2B.28,2a,2B,2S.2S,0, 103 
1B3, 1B3, 103,1 B3, 127! B 
103, 1B3, 1 83,111,42, 28. B 
IBS, 1B3, 111,127; 127, 1B3.B 
11S,11S,62,1B3,103,IB3,0 
1B3; IB3, 127.28,28,28.0 
102,108,24,55, 103; 127 



.BYTE 
.BYTE 
.BYTE 
.BYTE 
.BYTE 
.BYTE 
.BYTE 
.BYTE 127 
.BYTE 103 
.BYTE 103 
.BYTE 103 
.BYTE 115 
.BYTE 103 
.BYTE 127 



.WORD 170+«700B, 187+»7000 
.SBYTE "(C) WALT LORD 1984" 



(ROTATE COLOR AND EXIT DEF. 

I 

EXIT LDA RTCLKL 

AND 43 

BNE GONE 

LDA COLORS 

CLC 

ADC ttl 

ORA tia 

STA COLORS 
JMP XITVBV 



I 

■LOAD SID DCB FOR SECTOR ««2D0 
I 

.WORD DBUFLO,DBUFHI 

.WORD «B88B 

.WORD DAUX1,DAUX2 

.WORD *B2DB 



I 



■MASK OFF VSCROL VALUE 

■STORE IT 

■TOP OF WINDOW PNTR 



BONE 

■ 

■INCREMENT DISPLAY DATA POINTERS 

I 

INCDSP AND »*0F 

LDA DSPTRl 

CLC 

ADC MOVCNT 

STA DSPTRl 

LDA DSPTRl+1 

ADC MOVCNT+1 

BTA DSPTRl+1 

LDA DSPTR2 IMAGNIFIED LINE PNTR 

CLC 

ADC MOVCNT 

STA D8PTR2 

LDA DSPTR2+1 

ADC MOVCNT+1 

STA DSPTR2+1 

LDA DSPTR3 (BELOW MAGNIFIED LINE PNTR 

CLC 

ADC MOVCNT 

STA DSPTR3 

LDA DSPTR3+1 

ADC MOVCNT+1 

STA DSPTR3+1 

PLA (RESTORE VSCROL VALUE 

JMP STORE (80 STORE IT 
( 

■VSCROL VALUE TABLE 
■ 
SCRVAL .BYTE •F0, 1 , 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 , 8,9 

-BYTE 8,7,6,5, - - -'-'-* 



', 2', l!Bl»f9 



D8PL8T 



DSPTRl 



DaPTR2 
DBPTR3 



(••» DISPLAY LIST »•» 
■ 

.BYTE •70,»7B, »7B,»47 

.WORD HEADLN 

.BYTE •SB,»73 

.WORD DSPDAT 

. BYTE ass, *33, *33, *33, *33, *33. *92 

.BYTE 0,»D6 

.WORD MAGLN 

.BYTE •73 

.WORD DSPDAT+320 

.BYTE •33,«33,*33,«33,*33,»33,«12 

.BYTE •7B,»44 

.WORD FOOTLN 

-BYTE »41 

.WORD DSPLST 
I 

■HEADING LINE 
I 
HEADLN .SBYTE " 

.SBYTE +«B0, "nicrodaa* 

.SBYTE ■ 

.SBYTE +»8B,"Kl" 
I 

■FOOTER LINE 
( 
FOOTLN .SBYTE " 

.SBYTE +»8B,"up" 

.SBYTE " » 



.WORD INITADR, INITADR+1 

.WORD BETSEC 
I 

.WORD G0ADR,G0ADR+1 

.WORD MAINLN 
( 

DOSLEN - »-*4000 
( 

(CREATOR PROGRAM THAT WRITES 

(MICRODOS XL ONTO A DISK 
I 

»- »64B0 

LDY (tS 

LDA NEWCOL, Y (STORE NEW COLORS 

STA COLORS, Y 

DEY 

BNE CRB 

LDA M <MNUDSPL (STORE NEW DL 

STA 8DLSTL 

LDA » >MNUDSPL 

STA SDL8TL+1 

LDY #2 

LDX ttB 

LDA CHR0R8,X (MOVE OS CHARSET 

BTA T0PD082,X 

INX 

BNE CRl 

INC CRl+2 

INC CRl+S 

DEY 

BNE CR05 

LDX •»D0 

CR2 LDA CHRSET-1,X ■MOVE CHARSET 

STA •4107, X 

DEX 

BNE CR2 

LDA »«4B 

STA CHBAS 

LDA »*21 

STA SDMCTL 

CRLOOP LDA CONSOL 

ROR A 

BCC WRITE 

ROR A 

DCS CRLOOP 

LDA SY8NAME+1 (GET CURRENT DISK* 



CREATE 
CRB 



CR05 
CRl 



■SET TO NEW CHARSET 

■NARROW SCREEN 

I BET CONSOL 
(START PRESSED? 
lYES, WRITE LOADER 
I SELECT PRESSED? 



CMP »'4 
BNE CR42 
LDA *■ 1 
BNE CR43 



CLC 

ADC »1 

STA SYSNAME+l 

BTA TMPNAME+1 

STA RENAME+1 



■ •-4? 
■NO, SKIP 
(RESET TO 1 



■ INCREMENT • 

(* IN REQ. NAMES 



AND »(17 

ORA lt«B0 

STA DRVMSG 

LDA «0 

BTA RTCLKL 

LDA •50 

CMP RTCLKL 

BNE CR4S 

BEQ CRLOOP 

LDX •23 



■MAKE SCREEN BYTE 

( INVERSE VIDEO 

(DISPLAY IT 

(WAIT FOR BUTTON RELEASE 



(CLEAR ERRMSG 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 23 



I 



LDA »0 

STA ERRLN.X 

DEX 

BNE CRS 

JSR MRITLDR 

JMP CRLQDP 



URXTLDR 



IMRITE LOADER ON DISK 

— l_jjjl mjg jgg^ ^jj CHANNEL #3 

LDY * OYSNAME IPQINT TO 
LDA » >9Y8NAME l"D:D».8YS" 
JSR STQRADR I STORE POINTER 

LDA ««24 - 

JSR EXCCID 
LDA <»«21 
JSR EXCCIO 
LDY 
LDA 



■LOAD UNLOCK COMMAND 
(EXECUTE CIO COMMAND 
I LOAD DELETE COMMAND 
I EXECUTE CIO COMMAND 
» <TMPNAME IPOINT TO 
* >TMPNAME I "DiTEMP.TMP" 



JSR STORADR 
LDA H*03 
LDY «*es 

JSR EXCCIO 

BMI ERRJMP 

LDA »e 

STA ICBADR.X 

LDA «»i>0 



1 STORE PNTRS 
I LOAD OPEN COMMAND 
I SET TO OUTPUT 
(EXECUTE COMMAND 
(BRANCH IF CIO ERROR 
(SET BUFFER ADDR 



BTA 


ICBADR+l.X 

* <DOSLEN (BUFFER LENGTH 


LDA 


STA 


ICBLEN, X 


LDA 


» >dosCen 


STA 


ICBLEN+l.X 


LDA 


«*0B 


(LOAD PUT CHAR COMMAND 


JSR 


EXCCIO 


[EXECUTE COMMAND 


BMI 


ERRJMP 


[BRANCH IF CIO ERROR 


LDA 


«*0C 


[LOAD CLOSE COMMAND 


JSR 


EXCCIO 


(EXECUTE COMMAND 


BMI 


ERRJMP 


(BRANCH IF CIO ERROR 


LDY 


» <RENAME [POINT TO 


LDA 


* >RENAME [ "DITEMP.TMP. DOS. SYS 


JSR 


STORADR 


(STORE PNTRS 


LDA 


»«20 


(LOAD RENAME COMMAND 


JSR 


EXCCIO 


[EXECUTE COMMAND 


BPL 


GOODCIO 


(BRANCH IF CIO OK 


ERRJMP JMP 


ERRPR8 


(JUMP TO ERROR ROUTINE 


GOODCIO LDA 


• 1 


(READ 18T SECTOR 


STA 


DAUXl 




LDA 


»0 




STA 


DAUX2 




BTA 


DBUFLO 




LDA 


• >SECBUF 


BTA 


DBUFHI 




LDA 


«'R 




BTA 


DCOMND 




JSR 


DSKINV 




BPL 


ca 




JMP 


ERRPRS 




C« LDA 


DOSLNK 


(DOS SECTOR LINKS 



STA SECLNK+BASE+1 

LDA DNSYFL (GET DENSITY FLAS 

CMP #2 (DOUBLE DENSITY? 

BEQ DBLDENB (YES, BRANCH 

LDX ttS 

LDA SNSnSG.X I SET 'SINBLE" MSB 

STA DENSMSG.X 

DEX 

BPL CR4 

LDA «*80 (BET SINBLE VALUES 

LDX H«7D 

BNE STRDNS 



STA SECLNK+BASE ' 
LDA DOSLNK+1 



DBLDENB 


LDX 


#S (SET "DOUBLE" MSB 


CRS 


LDA 


DBLMSS.X 




STA 


DENSMS6,X 




DEX 






BPL 


CR3 




LDA 


•0 (SET DOUBLE VALUES 




LDX 


#»FD 


STRDNS 


STA 


SECLG+BASE (STORE SECTOR LENGTH 




BTX 


BUFFLEN (BYTES/SECTOR OFFSET 




LDA 


•■H (WRITE 1ST SECTOR 




STA 


DCOMND 




LDA 


• »S7 




STA 


DBUFHI 


MRSEC 


JSR 


DSKINV 




BMI 


ERRPRS 




LDA 


DBUFLO (ADVANCE TO NEXT SECTOR 




CLC 






ADC 


• «S0 




STA 


DBUFLO 




BCC 


INSCT 




INC 


DBUFHI 


INSCT 


INC 


DAUXl 




LDA 


DAUXl 




CMP 


• 4 




BNE 


MRSEC 




LDA 


tt*D0 (WRITE SECTOR »2D0 




STA 


DAUXl 




LDA 


«2 




STA 


DAUX2 




LDA 


SECLG+BASE (IN DESIRED DENSITY 




STA 


DBYTLO 




BNE 


CI 




INC 


DBYTHI 


CI 


LDA 


tt*80 




STA 


DSTATS 




LDA 


*»07 




STA 


DTIMLO 




JSR 


SIOV 




BMI 


ERRPRS 




LDX 


»7 


C0S 


LDA 


DQNEMSB.X (PRINT "- DONE -" 
ERRMSG-fi.X 




STA 




DEX 






BPL 


C0S 




RTB 




! PROCESS 


ERROR ROUTINE 


ERRPRS 


TYA 


(STORE ERROR NUMBER 



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C.O.D. No charge cards ac- 
cepted add $2.50 foreign 
orders normally out within 
48 hours. 



P.O. BOX 2205/REDONDO BEACH, CA 90278 

(213) 376-4105 

* Trademark of Atari, !nc. 



CIRCLE #108 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



PAGE 24 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



I LOAD CLOSE COMMAND 
18ET TO CHANNEL »3 
I EXECUTE COMMAND 
I RESTORE ERROR NUMBER 
■PROCESS ERROR 



I CONVERT TO 
|FL0AT.PNT->ASCII 



. ,Y 1 CONVERT ASCII 
I TO SCREEN VALUES 



PHA 

LDA tt«tlC 

LDX W*30 

JSR EXCCIO 
PLA 

STA FRa 

LDA »0 

STA FR0+1 

JSR IFP 

J5R FASC 

LDY »»FF 
INY 

LDA (INBUFF) 

SBC **20 
STA ERRNUM.Y 
LDA (INBUFF). Y 
BPL CIS 
AND StTF 

SBC »»2e 

STA ERRNUM.Y 

LDX «6 

LDA ERRLTR.X [PRINT "ERROR -" 

STA ERRMSSIX 

DEX 

BPL C2 

RTS 

STA ICCOM.X I STORE COMMAND 

TYA 

STA ICAUXl.X (STORE flUX BYTE 

JSR CIOV IDO CIO 

RTS 



STA ICBADR'i'l, 

TYA 

STA ICBADR.X 

RTS 

-BYTE 



X (STORE ADDRESS 



■FILE NAMES 
( 

BY8NAME .BYTE "Dl : D». SYS" . »9B 

TMPNAME .BYTE "Dl : TEMP. TM^ " , •9B 

RENAME .BYTE "Dl : TEMP. TMP, DOS. SYS" . »9B 

I 

(MENU DISPLAY LIST 

I 

MNUD8PL .BYTE »70, »7B, »70, (Afi 

.WORD ftNLHDa 

.BYTE »5B,«47 

.WORD MCRHDB 

.BYTE »S0,»il7 

.WORD CRTLN 

.BYTE »S0,»A2 

.WORD DSPDAT 

.BYTE 2.2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2 

.BYTE •70,*t6 

.WORD ERRLN 

.BYTE •Al 

.WORD MNUDSPL 



(HEADXNS 


LINES 




ANLHDG 


.8BYTE " 


<i 




.SBYTE +*S0, 
.SBYTE " » 


"ANALOG" 






MCRHDB 


.SBYTE " 






.SBYTE +»80, 


"nicradom" 




.SBYTE ■ " 






.SBYTE +«S0, 


!!"'" 


CRTLN 


.SBYTE " 






.SBYTE +»a0, 


"creator" 




.SBYTE " 




■DISPLAY 


DATA 

»- DSPDAT 






.SBYTE +»a0. 


INSERT F" 




.SBYTE +»B0, 


"ORMATTED 




.BBYTE +»80 


" DISK " 




.SBYTE +»a0; 


"INTO 




.SBYTE +»80; 


DRIVE •" 


DRWnSB 


.BBYTE +»80, 


"1 




.SBYTE +»8a, 


" SELECT " 




»- »+49 






.SBYTE "TO CHAN8E DISK DRIVE •■■ 




»- »+A9 






.SBYTE +»80, 


" START " 




»- »+4S 






.BBYTE "TO WRITE LOADER ONTO DISK 




»- •+3& 






.SBYTE +»80, 


It n 


DENSHSe 


.SBYTE +*S0 


"SINGLE " 




.SBYTE *tae. 


"DENSITY 


ERRLN 


*" »+2 




ERRM8B 


»- »4-e 




ERRNUM 


»- »+24 




(MESSAGES 




8NBMBB 


.SBYTE +»a0, 


"SINGLE" 


DBLM8B 


.SBYTE 'f«B0 


"DOUBLE" 


ERRLTR 


.SBYTE +»S0 


"•rror -" 


DONEMSG 


.SBYTE '•'«S0, 
.SBYTE " " 






.SBYTE +»80, 


"don«" 




.BBYTE " " 






.BBYTE +»B0, 


"_« 




»- BOADR 






.WORD CREATE 




.END 





WHAT IS 
CHECKSUM DATA? 

Most program listings in ANALOG Computing are followed by a table of numbers appearing as 
DATA statements, called "CHECKSUM DATA." Tf^ese numbers are to be used in conjunction with 
D:CHECK and C:CHECK (which appeared in ANALOG Computing issue 16 and the ANALOG 
Compendium) or with UNICHECK (from issue 24), 

D.-CHECK and C:CHECK (written by Istvan Mohos and Tom Hudson) and UNICHECK (by Tom 

Hudson) are designed to find and correct typing errors when readers are entering programs from 
the magazine. For those readers who would like copies of these articles, you may send for back 
issue 16 or 24 ($4,00 each) or the ANALOG Compendium ($14,95 plus $2.00 shipping and han- 
dling from: 

ANALOG Computing 

P. 0. Box 61 5 
Holmes, PA 19045 



Turn your Atari 
into a Ferrari. 



Introducing the all-new 1984 Indus GT™ disk 
drive. The most advanced, most complete, most 
handsome disk drive in the world. 

A flick of its "Power" switch can turn your Atari 
into a Ferrari. 

Looks like a Ferrari. 

The Indus GT is only 2.65" high. But under its 
front-loading front end is slimline engineering 
with a distinctive European-Gran flair. 

Touch its LED-lit CommandPost™ function con- 
trol AccuTouch™ buttons. Marvel at how respon- 
sive it makes every Atari home computer. 

Drives like a Rolls. 

Nestled into its soundproofed chassis is the 
quietest and most powerful disk drive power sys- 
tem money can buy. At top speed, it's virtually 
unbearable. Whisper quiet. 

Flat out, the GT will drive your Atari track-to- 
track 0-39 in less than one second. And when 
you shift into SynchroMesh DataTransfer,™ you'll 
increase your Atari's baud rate an incredible 
400%. (Faster than any other Atari system drive.) 

And, included as standard equipment, each 
comes with the exclusive 
GT DrivingSystem™ of 



software programs. World-class word processing 
is a breeze with the GT Estate Word Processor.™ 
And your dealer will describe the two additional 
programs that allow GT owners to accelerate their 
computer driving skills. 

Also, the 1 984 Indus GT is covered with the GT 
PortaCase™ A stylish case that conveniently dou- 
bles as a 80-disk storage file. 

Parks like a Beetie. 

The GT's small, sleek, condensed size makes it 
easy to park. 

And its low $449 price makes it easy to buy. 

So see and test drive the incredible new 1984 
Indus GT at your nearest 
computer dealer soon. 

The drive will be 
well worth it. 



INDUS 




The all-new 1984 Indus GT Disk Drive. 

The most advanced, most handsome disk drive in the v\/orld. 




^^m^^wk^^'' 



Foradclilionalinformation,cain-800-33-iNDUS.InCalilomia,ailM-aOO-54-INDUS.213/882-9600. 

© 1983 Indus Systems 9304 Deering Avenue, Chatsworlh, CA 9131 1 . The Indus GT Is a product of Indus Systems. Alan is a registered trademark ol Atari, Inc. 

CIRCLE #109 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



PAGE 26 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 




MONTHLY MORTGAGE 

CALCULATOR 



8K Cassette or 16K Disk 



by Amy H. Krohn 



A problem came up wherein I had to know quickly 
what monthly payments would be for a mortgage on 
a new house, and the effects of yearly tax advantages 
on my family. Mortgage rates seem to be changing 
almost daily, and points can be applied in the first 
year to reduce the mortgage percentage rate. 

Given the differences in rates, points, length of 
mortgage and, possibly, the amount of the mortgage, 
I determined that the calculations would probably 
have to be done many times. If I could write a sim- 
ple routine on the computer in under a few hours, 
I would save myself many hours of labor. 

When writing a computer program to solve a par- 
ticular problem, more time can be consumed writing 
the program than actually solving the original problem 
by hand. Thus the expression, "When you're up to 
your neck in alligators, it is difficult to remind your- 
self that your initial objective was to drain the swamp." 
This has lead to my philosophy that problems requir- 
ing repetitive calculations with varying inputs are 
ideally suited to computer solutions (unless the prob- 
lem is so trivial that simple mathematics could manu- 
ally solve it). 



The Monthly Mortgage Calculator took about two 
hours to write and debug in order to answer my ques- 
tions. It took another hour to pretty up the program 
for submission to ANALOG Computing. Looking 
back, the two hours I spent were worthwhile, as mort- 
gage rates and points have, indeed, varied since I ini- 
tially used MMC. 

To minimize debugging time and make the program 
readable, I used mnemonic names that were very des- 
criptive. Atari BASIC only stores the variable name 
once, so long names take up memory only the first 
time they're used. The advantage of mnemonics is 
self-evident once you read the program for MMC. An 
unexpected advantage of the mnemonics is that spell- 
ing errors on the program are lessened, presumably 
due to the "normal" language of the names. 

Program breakdown. 

Lines 300-340 open up either the screen or 
printer for output. 

Lines 350-420 ask you to input the para- 
meters needed to calculate mortgage infonnation. 
If you ask for hardcopy of the results, the para- 
meters are printed out. 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 27 



Lines 430-460 calculate some common vari- 
ables for later use in the program. 

Lines 470-510 calculate your monthly pay- 
ment. 

Line 500 rounds the payment to the nearest 
penny. 

Lines 520-560 calculate the total cost of the 
mortgage and print out the first piece of data that 
I needed — monthly payments. 

Lines 580-780 calculate and print the yearly 
interest and amortization paid. 

Lines 760-770 sum up the total interest and 
amortization paid. 

Line 790 recalculates the total cost by adding 
the yearly interest and amortization. 

Lines 800-830 print out the summary data. 

Line 840 asks if you want to calculate any 
more. 

You will notice that the total amortization calcu- 
lated at the end of MMC differs slightly from the loan 
amount. Since this difference is minor, and the ques- 
tions I had regarding the magnitude of the monthly 
payments and yearly interest were answered, I left this 
"bug." I could, of course, have spent time trying to 
omit this difference, but that might have defeated my 
original purpose, efficiency in programming. 

The task this time was to determine the size of 
monthly payments and the yearly interest amount. 
A few dollars up or down will not make any appre- 
ciable difference. In programming, remember to de- 
termine your goals and stick to them; you'll reap the 
benefits of a very powerful tool — your computer. D 

The author is a self-employed systems analyst consul- 
tant with twenty years of experience in software systems 
analysis and design. She holds three patents for computer- 
generated image systems. Her education includes a BS 
and MS in Mathematics, and an MS in Systems Science 
from Polytechnic Institute of New York. 



lee REM MKltmCKmtMimKMmtKWKlClCMKMMmCMmi 
lie REN * * 

128 REM * HOME MORTGAGE CALCULATOR « 
130 REM « » 

140 REM » NRITTEN JULY 1984 « 

150 REM « « 

160 REM * INPUT :LOAH AMOUNT-^ « 
170 REM » INTEREST RATE-Jt » 
180 REM » LENGTH OF L0AN-YR5 * 

190 REM » LOAN P0INT5->C » 
200 REM « * 

210 REM « OUTPUT: MONTHLY PAYMENT » 
220 REM » POINTS PAID-$ * 
230 REM * TOTAL COST » 

240 REM * INTEREST BY YEAR * 

250 REM * AMORTIZATION BY YR * 

260 REM * TOTAL INTEREST » 

270 REM * TOTAL AMORTIZATION * 

280 REM « « 

290 REM WKKMMKMMMMWKlCKMKmCIINmmKmCmCM 

300 DIM A$tl) 

310 GRAPHICS 

320 PRINT "HARDCDPY OR DISPLAY CH/D}": 

INPUT a$ 



330 OPEN n4,8,0,"E:" 

340 IF A$="H" THEN CLOSE tt4:0PEN tl4,8|, 

"P:" 

350 PRINT "AMOUNT OF MORTGAGE "; : 

INPUT LOAN 

360 IF AS="H" THEN PRINT tt4; "AMOUNT OF 

MORTGAGE = $";LOAN 
370 PRINT "ANNUAL PERCENTAGE RATE..":: 
INPUT ANNUALRATE : ANNUALRATE=ANNUALRATE 

/loe 

380 IF A5="H" THEN PRINT tt4; "ANNUAL PE 

RCENTAGE RATE = "; ANNUALRATE«100 

390 PRINT "LENGTH OF LOAN IN YEARS.";: 

INPUT NUNBEROFYEARS 

400 IF A$="H" THEN PRINT tt4; "LENGTH OF 

LOAN IN YEARS= ";NUieEROFYEARS 

410 PRINT "NUMBER OF POINTS "; : 

INPUT NUMBEROFPOINTS : NUM6EROFP0INTS=NU 

MBEROFPOINTS/100 

420 IF A*="H" THEN PRINT tt4; "NUMBER OF 

POINTS - ";NUMBE R0FP0INTS*100 

430 REM ■*i;i!M;f J-llll^Ji 

440 mNTHLYINTERESTRATE=ANNUALRATE/12 

450 NUMBER0FPAYMENTS=NUMBER0FYEARS«12 

460 LET POINTSPAID=NUMBER QFPOINTS*LOAN 

478 REM ■ ZMII IS i rJ pjj jI ' iZldlJIi a 

480 FACTMliTiflWNTMLVlHTERESTRATEJ^^NU 

MBEROFPAYMENTS 

490 IWNTHLYPAYMENT=LDAN«C CMONTHLYINTER 

ESTRATE»FACT0R1 J / CFACT0R1-1> ) 

500 MONTHLYPAYMENT=INT t CMONTHLYPAYMENT 

+5.0E-03)»100) 

510 IWNT HLYPAYMEHT-M ONTHLYPAYMENT/100 

520 REM iaiilWiiliM.-ffM 

530 COST=: CMONTHLYPAYMENTl^NUMBEROFPAYie 

NTSJ+POINTSPAID 

(continued on next page) 




Don't be caught suprised at tax time. Know 
exactly what your taxes will be all year long. EDU-TAX 
is a menu driven program with extensive on screen 
explanations. EDU-TAX includes these schedules 
and forms: 

Form 1040 

Schedule A — Itemized Deductions 

Schedule B — Interest/Dividends 

Schedule C — Business Income 

Schedule D — Capital Gains/Losses 

Schedule E — Supplemental Income 

Schedule G — Income Averaging 

Schedule W— Marital Deductions 

Form 2106 — Unreimbursed Employee Expense 

Form 21 19 — Sales of Residence 

Form 4684 — Casualties and Theft Losses 

EDU-TAX is currently 50% off the suggested retail 
price of $50.00. EDU-TAX is now only $25.00 plus 
$2.00 for shipping and handling. Direct only. 




EDU-TAX 

P.O. Box 16785 
San Antonio, TX 78216 



Texas Residents add 5%. 
Commodore 64-Disk — Atari 48K- 



CHECK 

OR 
MONEY 
ORDER 



Disk 



CIRCLE #110 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



PAGE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



540 PRINT tt4: PRINT tt4;"H0NTHLY PAYMENT 

MOULD BE :$";HONTHLYPAVHENT 
550 PRINT It4; "POINTS PAID HOULD BE 

:$";P0INT5PAID 
560 PRINT tt4; "TOTAL COST MOULD BE 

: S" ; COST 

580 REM ■i.'iiJ;IJL-fc»»'.1!ril;l*»lJ|iiii;B 
590 DEBT=LOAN .-ir,-,..,,-.™ 

680 TOTALAHORTIZATION=0 

610 TOTALINTEREST=0 

620 PRINT tt4: PRINT tt4;"YEAR INTER 

EST AmRTIZATION 

630 FOR 1=1 TO NUHBEROFYEARS 

640 YEARLYINTEREST=0:IF 1=1 THEN YEARL 

VINTEREST=POINTSPAID 

650 YEARLYAHORTIZATION=e 

660 FOR J=l TO 12 

670^M0NTHLYINTEREST=fM0NTHLYINTERESTRA 

l?2='*2^T!!tyi¥IEP^*T=INT C (MONTHLYINTERE 
ST+5.0E-03J#1003 

690 M0NTHLVINTEREST=M0NTHLYINTEREST/10 


700 mNTHLYAMORTIZATI0N=MONTHLYPAYMENT 

-MONTHLYINTEREST 

710 DEBTpDEBT-MONTHLVAMORTIZATION 

720 YEARL YINTEREST=YEARLYINTEREST+NONT 

HLYINTEREST 

730 YEARLYAHORTIZATION=YEARLYANORTIZAT 

lON+KONTHLYAMORTIZATION 

740 NEXT J 

ORTIZATION*** ' ^ ' ^E*''*-V^"TEREST , YE ARL YAM 

760 T0TALINTEREST=T0TALINTEREST4^YEARLY 
INTEREST 

770 TOTALAHORTIZATION=TOTALAMORTIZATIO 

N+YEARLYAMORTIZATION 

780 NEXT I 



790 T0TALC0ST=T0TALINTEREST4T0TALAN0RT 
IZATION 

800 PRINT tt4: PRINT tt4;: PRINT tt4; "TOTAL 
S:" 

810 PRINT ft4;"INTEREST 5";T0TALINT 
EREST 

820 PRINT tt4; "AMORTIZATION $";TOTALANO 
RTIZATION 

830 PRINT tt4;"C0ST $";TOTALCOS 

T 

840 PRINT : PRINT "CALCULATE ANY MORE ( 
Y/NJ. .."rINPUT A$:IF AS="Y" THEN CLOSE 
tt4:RUN 



CHECKSUM DATA. 

(see page 24) 

100 DATA 778,241,191,247,527,253,749,3 

93,527,266,240,229,165,6,372,5184 

250 DATA 852,373,778,264,807,738,891,1 

32,282,7,487,684,948,24,908,8175 

400 DATA 957,796,111,3,719,634,592,944 

,814,676,386,775,789,910,185,9291 

550 DATA 715,786,8,182,404,94,534,145, 

766,749,146,63,554,951,483,6580 

710 DATA 972,808,650,754,169,258,127,7 

64,919,248,807,592,686,608,8362 



Make Your Best Connection 





WITH • Smart Terminal Program-with X Modem Protocol • "R:" Handler 
-use with Basic, ACTION!, etc. • AVAILABLE SOON - Advanced software 
disk with 80 Column Terminal Program. 

Available in Four IVIodels to match Your Modem - compatible with most 
RS-232 devices. 



Works with - A tari 400 ; 600XL ; 800 ; 800XL 



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INTERFAST-r 

BUFFERED PRINTER INTERFACE 



Can You Print This? 



SlCR-IPX t.-!Wt:*aa< sx^Ajfdc. 



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* trademark of Atari. Inc. 

ACTION! is a trademark of Action Computer Services 
R-Verter and INTERFASTJ are trademarks of Advanced 
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I ADVANCED INTERFACE DEVICES | 



MC — VISA — C.O.D. 

P.O. Box 2188 

Melbourne, PL 32902 

(305) 242-2772 



CIRCLE #111 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 29 



HOMEPAK 

BATTERIES INCLUDED 
186 Queen Street West 
Toronto, Canada M5V1Z1 
(416) 596-1405 
48K Disk $49.95 



by Arthur Leyenberger 



There are many buzzwords used in the computing 
field. Some of the more popular are: mouse, windows, 
networking and integrated software. As you probably 
know, integrated software refers to a program that com- 
bines several functions. Often, such functions as word 
processing, spreadsheets, database management and 
graphics are combined into one overall program. 

Examples of this type of program quickly come to 
mind; Lotus 1-2-3, Framework and Context MBA are 
just a few of the products currently available. These 
types of programs typically cost hundreds of dollars 
and only run on the "big rigs," such as IBM personal 
computers and the PC clones. 

Back in the old days (three or so years ago), when 
I first purchased my Atari computer, I spent $800 for 
a 16K machine. Adding a printer, disk drive, interface, 
more memory and a monitor brought the cost of my 
Atari system to over $2000. Spending a couple hun- 
dred dollars for a program (I purchased VisiCalc for 
the Atari in 1981 for the list price of $250) was not 
unreasonable, given that it was about one-tenth of 
the cost of the entire computer system. But what do 
you do when the price of an Atari 800XL with 64K 
memory and BASIC is only $120? Surely you don't 
go out and spend $250 for a program to run on it. 

If you're wondering what this is leading to, consider 
what you might expect to spend for an integrated pro- 
gram for the Atari computer. . .one that offers word 
processing, telecommunications and database manage- 
ment functions. If you glanced at the title of this re- 
view article, you know that I'm referring, of course, 
to HomePak by Batteries Included. If you think that 
$50 — which is less than the typical cost of a program 
to perform just one of these functions — can only buy 
a mediocre program with little practical value, you'd 
better finish reading this review. You should also pre- 
pare to learn that, in the case of HomePak, your $50 
buys a lot of program. 

HomeTerm. 

This is the telecommunications program included 
in HomePak. Ron Luks reviewed the HomeTerm por- 
tion itself in issue 25, so for details on the program, 
you can check that article. As he put it, "HomeTerm 
alone will pay for the series in a few short sessions." 

My opinion is that HomeTerm is one of the best 
available terminal programs for the Atari. Its strength 
lies in its power and ease of use. However, if you de- 
cide not to take advantage of the more sophisticated 



features of the program, you still have a powerful pro- 
gram that will let you "reach out and touch someone." 

HomeText. 

There's more. The second program in the HomePak 
trilogy is HomeText, a useful, full-featured word pro- 
cessor. HomeText is a full screen editor that allows 
complete control of margins, indentation, line center- 
ing and spacing, and placement of headers, footers 
and page numbers. 

You start with a blank screen, except for status in- 
formation at the bottom that shows your remaining 
buffer size and the current mode. You can toggle be- 
tween "insert" or "replace" mode, and screen color, 
intensity and margins may be changed at any time. 
Word-wrapping occurs as you type, and the current 
tab stops are shown at the top of the screen. 



BATTERIES ^ INCLUDED 



UomePal^ 



A Breakthrough Integrated 
Software System 



by 
RUSSWETMORE 




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HomeTexf 

A computerized writing tool. 

A comprehensive Word 
Procesang program. 



HomeFind 

An electronic filing system 

wtifCh you command witti 
natural Engli^ s^ferxjea 



HomeTerm^ 

A telephone communications 

program Ihat ailcMS you and your 
computer lo taik to the world 



ATARI 
4BK 
DISK 




HomePak. 



Block text operations are provided for "cutting and 
pasting" words, sentences, paragraphs, or even pages 
— you can move them from anywhere, to anywhere 
in your document. Searching and replacing may be 
performed on any text string, either individually or 
globally throughout the document. 

A very useful feature of HomeText is the print pre- 
view option. When used, this gives a graphic represen- 
tation on-screen of how your text will appear on the 
printed page. Dotted lines are used to illustrate each 
line of text, and special printer features are indicated. 
For example, underlined words are shown with a green 
line beneath them, normal characters are displayed 
in black, and boldface characters are shown in blue. 
This is another example of the extra features provided 
by HomeText. 

In addition to printer functions (justification, cen- 
tering, and bold or underline printing), HomeText al- 
lows you to send to the printer function codes that 



PAGE 30 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



are not already built into the program. This provides 
for the printing of sub- and superscripts, italics and 
other special functions, depending upon the capabil- 
ities of the printer you're using. It also ensures that 
your printer will be useable with HomeText, regard- 
less of its brand. 

HomeText also permits the chaining of files, to let 
you print a document that's larger than the buffer size. 
Output can be sent to either the printer or a disk. 
Disk directories of any of four disk drives may be ob- 
tained at any time from within the program. 

One particularly good aspect of HomeText is that 
the various menus for block functions and other com- 
mands are readily accessible by pressing the START/ 
SELECT/OPTION keys. If you're new to HomeText- 
or haven't used it for quite a while — pressing any of 
these keys brings a menu onto the screen. After mak- 
ing your selection, the program carries out your com- 
mand, and the screen reverts back to showing your 
text. For experienced users, holding down the special 
function key and entering a choice will accomplish 
the same thing, without displaying a menu on the 
screen. 

Like HomeTerm, HomeText is a very powerful pro- 
gram that's easy to use and could justify the cost of 
the entire package on its own. 



HomeFind. 

The third part of HomePak is the information man- 
ager, HomeFind. It features an easy-to-learn command 
language that can be mastered by first-time computer 
users, as well as the more experienced. 

Not really a database program, HomeFind is what 
I call an "information utility." This means that infor- 
mation can be stored in whatever format makes sense 
to you — and retrieved with a few simple commands. 

Database programs generally depend upon a rigid 
framework of fields, records and files. Once you've 
created and entered data into a field, it typically can- 
not be changed. For example, if you've got a field 
called "Name," and it is twenty characters in width, 
there's no way to enter a thirty-character name. Be- 
sides, most of us don't think of things we know in 
terms of fields and records. Rather, we tend to organize 
information in a relational way. . ."Dave is my boss." 
When I think, "Who is my boss?" Dave comes to 
mind. 

This is how HomeFind works. Information is en- 
tered in the way that it occurs to you. If Dave's title 
is Supervisor of Coffee Breaks is entered into Home- 
Find, I can later ask, "Who's Dave?" and the com- 
puter will answer with all the information I've typed 
in about Dave. Likewise I could ask, "What's Dave's 



H =««^io=^!. oo<= ORDER TOLL FREE , „iiI;"To°!e 

1-800-328-1226 1-800-626-2345 

(orders only) Hrs. M-F 10:00- 6:00 (GST) (orders onfy) 



SPECIALS 



Entertainer Kit 

Pac Man, Star Raiders & pr. Atari Joysticks 30.00 

Indus GT Disk Drive 289.95 

S'A" SS/DD Disk W/Sieeves (25 Pack) 32.50 

Kraft Singie Button Joystick 7.95 

Kraft Switcti Hitter Joystick 8.95 

Amaray Disk Bank 

(Holds so Disks) 12.95 

MPP 1000C Modem 119.95 



ORDERING INFORMATION... 

To order, call toll free or send by rrail. For fastest ser- 
vice use your Visa or Ivlasler Card (include card # and 
exp. date), or send a money order or cashier's check. 
Allow 2 weeks for personal checks to clear. Add 3% 
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exchange only. 

Customer Service 61 2-784-681 6 

CIRCLE #112 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



PRINTERS 



BMC BX80 229.95 

Epson RX80 239.95 

Epson RX80FT 279.95 

Epson RX100 429.95 

Epson FX80 399.95 

Epson FX100 649.95 

Epson MX/RX/FX80 Ribbons 5.95 

BMC BX80 Ribbon 7.95 

MPP 1150 Interface 75.00 

Cardco AT Printer Interface 59.95 

Atari 850 Interface 139.95 



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ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 31 



title?" and the computer would respond in the same 
way. 

Although this process is remarkably simple and 
straightforward, there are a few tricks that you must 
learn, to use the information manager effectively. 

The syntax for data entry is always "subject's tag's 
object." The subject is the who or what you are stor- 
ing information about; the tag is the relation of the 
subject to the object; and the object is the piece of 
information associated with the subject. This might 
sound complicated, but it really isn't, in practice. An 
example will help clarify the way it works. 

Assume the following items are entered into Home- 
Find: (1) Jean's birthday's September 21, 1984; (2) Teddy's 
Jean's cat; (3) Teddy's playmate's Jenny; and (4) Jean's 
Art's beautiful wife. All of these entries are legal, and 
all conform to the data entry syntax. When these en- 
tries are first typed, the computer responds with News 
to me. This informs you that they are new entries. 
The important part of the subject and the tag is the 
apostrophe. That is how the computer relates the sub- 
ject, tag and object together. 

If I wanted the name of Jean's cat, I would type 
Who's Jean's cat, and the computer would respond with 
Jean's cat's Teddy. If I typed Who's Teddy, I would see 
Teddy's Jean's cat and Teddy's playmate's Jenny. 

Comments may be added to any of the data that 
is entered, and they will not be part of the search 
criteria. Entries may be changed at any time, either 
during typing or after the information is stored on 
disk. Like the other HomePak programs, current sta- 
tus information is always displayed on the screen. 

This information includes whether printing is on 
or off (toggled with the OPTION key), how much disk 
storage is available, whether the key click is on or off, 
the name of the file in use, and the drive number con- 
taining the data disk. The screen color and brightness, 
and the text brightness, can be varied at any time. 
Also, the left margin can be changed. These config- 
uration options may be permanently stored on your 
program disk, to become the default values during fu- 
ture sessions. 

HomeFind is a unique data manager that, with a 
little practice, can become very useful. It is powerful 
and contains many thoughtful features. For example, 
when the printer is on, the program only echoes rele- 
vant information that appears on-screen. Things like 
new entries, requests and everything that is retrieved 
is printed. Prompts and error messages do not appear 
on the printout. Also, printed reports can be gener- 
ated by HomeText, using HomeFind information. 

HomeFind also allows you to create merge files to 
be used with HomeText. A merge file is a special file 
created from within HomeFind, containing all of the 
objects associated with a specified subject or tag. Later, 
when using HomeText, you can insert "merge tokens" 
into the text, in order to call up the objects saved 
in the file. 



For example, if I had a file with my most frequently 
used names and addresses, I could simply type Dl: 
Dave's Address in the body of my text. When printed, 
Dave's full name and address would appear. 

The whole pak. 

Russ Wetmore has done an excellent job with all 
three modules of HomePak. The program is flexible, 
powerful and very simple to use. Batteries Included 
should also receive kudos for their pricing and mar- 
keting policy. As mentioned before, HomePak will 
retail for only $49.95 — and it will come on an un- 
protected disk. This means that you can make your 
own backup copies of the program. 

Batteries Included is taking a chance on Atari users. 
They assume that, by offering software which provides 
a lot of value and is inexpensive, it will be a success 
— and won't be pirated. 1 know the former is a cer- 
tainty, and I hope the latter comes true. Good job, 
Russ. D 



For an in-depth look at the HomeTerm section 
of Batteries Included's HomePak, see Ron Luks' 
review in the December issue of ANALOG Com.' 
puting (issue 25), page 13. 




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THE TAX ADVANTAGE 
CONTINENTAL SOFTWARE 
11223 South Hindry Avenue 
Los Angeles, CA 90045 
48K Disk $69.95 



by Karl E. Wiegers 

One way to while away the winter hours 
is to compute your income taxes, but this 
hobby quickly changes to nerve-wracking 
tedium. Thanks to the home computer, 
some relief is in sight. The Tax Advantage 
is a comprehensive aid in the preparation 
of your federal income tax return, includ- 
ing Form 1040 and all the schedules needed 
by a typical individual taxpayer. 

Any income tax preparation program 
should have several basic features. Since 
completing my tax return takes quite a 
while, I'd like to be able to store interme- 
diate results on disk and resume where 
I left off later. Second, it must be very 
easy to move around within the maze of 
schedules to enter and change numbers. 
Next, the program should print out re- 
ports sufficiently similar to the layput of 
the IRS forms to make transferring data 
to the real thing a snap. Naturally, the 
program must calculate accurately and 
rapidly, sparing me the burden of "busy 
work" calculations. Finally, the documen- 
tation should be crystal clear; understand- 
ing our tax laws is complicated enough, 
without having to decipher the program 
rules as well. 

I was delighted to find that Tax Advan- 
tage has all these desirable traits. This pro- 
gram comes professionally packaged in a 
small three-ring binder, with slots for the 
two-sided program disk and the data disk 
you will supply. 

Besides a standard Form 1040, Tax Ad- 
vantage will go line-by-line through Sched- 
ules A (itemized deductions), B (interest/ 
dividend income), C (business income), D 
(capital gains/losses), E (supplemental in- 
come), G (income averaging), SE (Social 
Security, self-employment income), W (the 
married couple where both work), and 4562 
(depreciation and amortization). 









Tax Advantage functions are controlled 
by menus, movement through which is 
generally performed by single keystrokes. 
The main menu has options to enter data 
on the various forms and schedules, enter 
taxpayer information to be printed at the 
top of each output page, print the com- 
pleted forms, run a 5 -minute demonstra- 
tion of the program, go to a utility menu, 
or exit from the program. All menu options 
are clearly described in the manual. 

The utility menu has four functions. You 
can initialize a new data disk (simply for- 
matting with Atari DOS is not enough). 
A separate disk is needed for each return 
being processed, so tell your friends to bring 
an extra disk. 

Option two lets you specify the drive 
number for your data disk and the kind of 
printer you are using. You can choose an 
Atari 825, Epson MX80, NEC 8023 A, 
Centronics 700 series, or specify printer 
control codes for a different type of printer. 
The manual thoughtfully lists appropriate 
codes for twenty-four printers. 

Other utility menu options help you 
transfer data from Continental Software's 
Home Accountant financial program 
to a Tax Advantage data disk, or 
or to convert a 1982 Tax Advan- 
tage disk to the 1983 format. 

The heart of the program is 
the entry of data into the IRS 
forms and schedules. The screen 
display shows a portion of the 
appropriate form in each case, 
with matching line numbers 
and descriptions from the IRS 
form itself. At the bottom is a 
display of the single-keystroke 
commands which are available. 
You can move a pointer up or 
down to a particular line 
to make entries or jump 
to a specific line num- 
ber. You can page for- 
ward or backward to 
see the rest of the 
current form. 

(continued on 
next page) 



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PAGE 34 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



Data can be entered several ways. If you press E, 
Tax Advantage accepts a numerical entry for the line 
number where the pointer is. Pressing 1 lets you item- 
ize a particular entry. This is helpful if you need to 
break down a miscellaneous deduction or income item 
into individual components. Besides these modes, you 
can press + or — to add or subtract a new entry from 
the current amount shown at some line. 

Entering data for Tax Advantage is straightforward. 
You always have the option to edit an entry or to con- 
tinue. Detailed descriptions of many lines on the tax 
forms can be obtained by pressing H, though you may 
just see a No additional information message. 

The entry and movement keystrokes are consistent 
from form to form, so they're easy to remember. And, 
if you want to peek at the financial bottom line peri- 
odically, pressing T shows your tax due and marginal 
tax bracket based on the entries made so far. 

As you work on Form 1040, you may need a separ- 
ate schedule, like Schedule A, to itemize. Indicating 
/ at such a line takes you to an appropriate data en- 
try form. This operation shows a shortcoming of Tax 
Advantage — its need for many disk changes. Both 
front and back of the program disk are used, and your 
data is stored on yet another disk; you must be an 
adroit disk jockey to keep up with frequent demands 
to insert side x of disk y into drive 1. It's simpler for 
users with two drives, but still the program disk must 
be flipped often, slowing data entry considerably. 

After your income and deduction data is entered. 
Tax Advantage quickly calculates actual tax due and 
corrects for the amount withheld, or other credits, 
to arrive at a final figure for additional tax owed or 
amount overpaid. I was amused that Tax Advantage 
places the amount overpaid on the Form 1040 line 
indicating that the amount is to be applied against 
next year's taxes. I prefer the cash, personally. 

Tax Advantage is written in BASIC A+ from Op- 
timized Systems Software. The BASIC A+ language 
is included on the program disk, and automatically 
loads when you're starting the program. Program ex- 
ecution is sufficiently fast for this application. 

So far, everything you've entered and calculated just 
exists in electronic or magnetic form. The main menu 
of Tax Advantage lets you print out reports which 
closely resemble the actual IRS forms. For each form 
or schedule, you can print the form alone and/or any 
additional itemized entries you made. 

Again, the disk swapping needed slows the printing 
down. Printouts are well laid out, with taxpayer in- 
formation topping each page. Transferring data from 
the facsimiles to authentic IRS forms is very simple. 

One reason for buying an income tax preparation 
program is to avoid the tedious computations involved 
with income averaging. Tax Advantage works beau- 
tifully in this respect. I spent under five miiiutes en- 
tering the necessary figures for four base years into 
Schedule G, and Tax Advantage did the rest. 



The report printed for Schedule G contains results 
from all intermediate calculations — unlike some tax 
programs, which show only the final result (forcing 
you to compute the others by hand). Tax Advantage 
makes it less painful to redo the income-averaging 
procedure if you dig up another deduction later on. 

The documentation for Tax Advantage is excellent. 
It's well organized, with a good table of contents and 
index. Virtually all the screens you'll find when us- 
ing the program are reproduced in the manual. Op- 
tions for each menu and screen are clearly described. 

A tutorial is included, in which you enter a mythi- 
cal person's financial information, to get the feel of 
the program before tackling your own. Between this 
tutorial and the disk-based demonstration, where the 
program runs itself while you watch, you can learn 
to use Tax Advantage quickly. 

I have a few minor complaints about Tax Advan- 
tage. It only handles whole dollars, even if you enter 
dollars and cents. I prefer exact amounts, to double- 
check my arithmetic, but that isn't an essential with 
a properly-written program. (All calculations done in 
my computer-completed return, when checked, were 
correct.) Also, the program uses no color or sound. 
Its background is a darker blue than Atari's standard 
background, and 1 couldn't get really sharp letters on 
my TV set. The incessant disk swapping will be the 
chief complaint of the single drive owner. 

The warranty for Tax Advantage is a bit unusual, 
in that you're asked to include $10.00 with your war- 
ranty card. Four main benefits are included. Your pro- 
gram disk will be replaced, if necessary, up to one year 
from date of purchase, instead of ninety days. You get 
one year's service from Continental Software's cus- 
tomer support group for questions or problems. Pro- 
gram updates will be sent free of charge for a year. 
Finally, you can buy next year's version of Tax Ad- 
vantage at half the suggested retail price. 

I think $10.00 is exorbitant for these services. Cus- 
tomer support should come with any major software 
package. Program updates are important if you bought 
Tax Advantage before 1983 laws and forms were final- 
ized, but corrections announced after April 15 will 
make many customers unhappy. Furthermore, it's al- 
ready possible to buy this program at a substantial dis- 
count through mail-order software outlets, diluting 
the final warranty advantage. 

In conclusion, Tax Advantage is an excellent aid 
in the preparation of your federal income tax return. 
It's comprehensive, well documented and simple to 
use. The options provided for tax planning and ex- 
tracting data from the Home Accountant will attract 
many potential buyers. 

This is not a program for the professional tax 
preparer, nor does it offer any tax advice, but it can 
make life easier for anyone whose federal return can't 
be squeezed onto Form 1040EZ or 1040A. And, of 
course, the purchase price is tax deductible. D 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 35 



New Computers 

(continued from page 5) 

In addition, a iVi-inch, 10-megabyte hard disk will be 
available for under $600, to be used with the built-in 
DMA hard disk controller (1.333 megabytes/second 
transfer rate). An RS232C serial port and a Centron- 
ics parallel port can be found on the computers. A 
ROM cartridge port, two joystick ports and an audio 
output round out the ST interfacing. One of the 
joystick ports doubles as a mouse port. 

Monitors for the ST family consist of the SM 124, 
a 12-inch, high resolution monochrome mode 
priced under $100, and the SC 1224, a 12-inch, 
medium resolution RGB color monitor for under 
$200. Another monitor was on display but not 
included as part of the official line. The VMF 
300F is a 19-inch composite/RGB monitor that 
had an excellent display. The electronics and 
picture tube are made by JVC. Price had yet 
to be decided for this particular model. 

Four printers were announced as part of the ST 
peripherals family. The STC 204 is a non-impact, 
dot matrix, 20-cps color printer, under $100. The 
STC 504 is a non-impact, 50-cps color printer, un- 
der $150. The SMM 801 is an 80-cps, dot matrix im- 




Ahove: tlic STC 504, the new dot matrix, non-impact, color 

printer. Below: the 
""x ^ SDM 121, Atari's 

daisy wheel let- 
ter quality 
printer. 





The 65XEP, 

Atari's 8-bit 
portable computer. 



pact printer, under $200. The SDM 121 is a 12-cps, 
letter quality, daisy wheel printer, under $200. 

Rock bottom prices. 

Not only did Atari announce two major computer 
lines, they also made history with their extremely low 
prices. Atari's theme for CES was "Power without the 
Price." Consider the effect Atari will have on the en- 
tire computer industry with its low prices. If you're 
familiar with the Apple Macintosh, then you prob- 
ably know that to upgrade to 512K bytes of RAM 
from the original 128K costs approximately $1000. 
Now, for the price of a Mac upgrade, you can have 
an entire 512K computer, two 3^2 -inch 500K disk 
drives and color. I'd imagine Apple must be just 
a little worried right now. 

The main question, of course, is: can Atari 
deliver the new ST computers in a timely way? 
Jack Tramiel promised to put the machine in 



the hands of software developers by the end of Janu- 
ary. Jack is known for keeping his promises. 

The other question is: will anyone buy the ST com- 
puters? Do they offer enough of an upgrade from ex- 
isting technology for the experienced user to want 
one? Do they offer the types of capabilities that the 
new user would want? The answer to both questions 
is yes. 
The new Atari ST computers truly represent to 
the consumer what Jack Tramiel is saying — easy-to- 
use computing power without the price. And you can 
be sure that ANALOG Computing magazine will 
support all of the new machines in these very pages. 
1985 will definitely be an interesting year, not only 
for Atari users, but for the entire computer industry. 
Congratulations, Atari, on your debut. It was worth 
the wait! D 

Arthur Leyenberger is a human factors psychologist and 
free-lance writer living in New Jersey. 




The Atari 130ST 
16-bit computer, with 
the SC 1224 RGB 
monitor. 

The computer is 
running the GEM 
operating system, by 
Digital Research. 



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CIRCLE #116 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



17875 Sky Park North, 
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ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 37 



YOUR PERSONAL NET WORTH 

Developed by ISA Software, Inc. 

Published by SCARBOROUGH SYSTEMS, INC. 

25 North Broadway 

Tarrytown, NY 10591 

(914) 332-4545 

48K Disk $79.95 

by Bob Curtin 

Certainly games are fun, but in the long run, it's 
the utilities — the number-crunching capability of the 
Atari — which keep me at the keyboard. My trusty 800 
has been used to bang out articles and programs, write 
a novel, keep track of the household budget, and per- 
form a slew of other, less important tasks. It's still used 
to play games, of course, but I learned a long time 
ago that my Atari has a serious side. 

So, when I noticed the Scarborough System box 
on a recent work-scrounging trip to the ANALOG 
Computing offices, I grabbed it. I'd heard of the ex- 
cellent software products by this company but, until 
now, have not had the pleasure of actually using any 
of it. I was certainly not disappointed. 

Financial control for everyone? 

Well, not exactly, but Your Personal Net Worth 
is a beautifully packaged, well-documented, and suit- 
ably complex program. It is, without a doubt, a power- 
ful tool for managing just about anyone's finances. 

Net Worth is based on standard accounting prin- 
ciples, though they've wrung out a lot of the detail 
of a full blown accounting method, leaving you with 
a nicely manageable system. Net Worth will handle 
up to 420 different financial categories and store over 
3000 financial records on each disk. 

It'll help you manage up to ten separate bank ac- 
counts, including helping you reconcile your bank ac- 
counts each month. It'll keep a record of your credit 
card transactions and reconcile those accounts at 
month's end. 

Net Worth will also allow you to keep a household 
inventory, including the purchase price, current market 
value, and whether or not an item is insured. There's 
also a stock portfolio provision to record your stock 
purchases and sales, and to keep a history of your port- 
folio. If that isn't enough, how about printing your 
checks for you? 

As with all financial packages of any worth (pun 
intended), most of the work is in the initial setup and 
the first few months of the data entry process. It takes 
a while to get any system down pat, and Net Worth 
is certainly no different. 

TVteie are two disks included in the package. One 
is copy-protected and contains the program. The other 
is a data disk which is not copy-protected — in fact, 
they recommend that you copy it immediately. This 
data disk holds the categories and accompanying data. 



The first step in using Net Worth is to define your 
categories in each of the four types of accounts. The 
data disk provides a full range of suggested categories, 
any of which can be changed or eliminated. 

Once the categories are fixed, the next step is to 
input the beginning balances, set up your loan ac- 
counts and do your household inventory. (It's recom- 
mended that you do this on paper before you enter 
the data into the computer, since accuracy at this 
point is essential.) If you have a stock portfolio, now 
is the time to enter that information. 

From then on, Net Worth goes to work for you, 
on several different levels. Each category is treated 
as a separate account, and the accounts are grouped 
together into five distinctly different types. 



PERSONAL NET HO R T H 



TAX RECORDS 
PERSONAL PROPERTY 
STOCK PORTFOLIO 
MAINTENANCE 
EXIT 



SELECTION: Q 
PRESS CTBL-7 AT ANV TTME FOR HELP 



Your Personal Net Worth. 

Income accounts and expense accounts are used to 
record all monies coming in or going out of the house- 
hold. These two account types are used in conjunc- 
tion with a monthly budget, and at any given time, 
you can get a summary of the incoming or outgoing 
accounts, so you can compare the actual against the 
budgeted amounts. Expense accounts include utilities, 
car expenses, clothing, groceries, medical/dental, etc. 
Income accounts include salaries, bonuses, commis- 
sions, interest, etc. 

Asset accounts record the value of your assets— 
that is, the things you own— such as your house or 
car. These assets can change in value from year to 
year through depreciation, appreciation or damage. 
Asset accounts include your bank accounts, cash, 
jewelry, stocks, bonds, life insurance, car(s), house(s), 
and so on. 

Liability accounts record the amount of money you 
owe, such as the mortgage on your house, car loan 
and the like. Net Worth makes a distinction between 
expenses and liabilities. Liability accounts do not re- 

(continued on page 40) 



YOU HAVE ALREADY MADE 
YOUR FIRST MISTAKE! 

You thought that cassette recorder 
would handle your storage needs. 

WRONG 

DON'T MAKE ANOTHER ONE! 

You think you need a disk drive to 
solve your storage problems. 

WRONG 

YOU NEED 2 DISK DRIVES! 

Any serious application practically 
demands at least 2 drives. 

WORD PROCESSING 

SPREADSHEET 

DATA BASE MANAGEMENT 

MAILING LIST SOFTWARE 
All of these are made more powerful 
and, at the same time, easier to use if 
you have two disk drives. 
So now it will cost twice as much, 
risht? WRONG 

You need an Astra single or double 
density dual disk drive. Two drives 
in one 



AND NOW ASTRA HAS THREE 
MODELS FOR YOUR ATARI 

ASTRA 1620 

Our original single or double density dual disc drive. 
Two drives, for the price of one. 
(360 KBYTES) 

ASTRA 2001 

All of the features 

of the 1620, but 

with improved 

circuitry, rotary 

doors, and direct 

drive motors. 
(360 KBYTES) 




9f 



ASTRA "BIG D 

Double sided, single or double density, 
dual disk drive. 
(720 KBYTES) 

ALL DRIVES FURNISHED WITH 
SMARTDOS OR MYDOS * 

*DOUBLE SIDED DRIVES 

FOR NEAREST DEALER OR DISTRIBUTOR 
CALL (714) 549-2141 



>^iV 



flSTRfl SVSTGMS 



2500 South Fairview • unit L • Santa Ana, Ca. 92704 

CIRCLE #116 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



PAGE 40 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



cord the outlay of money, but only the amount of 
money owed. As payments are made, the liability gets 
smaller. 

The last account type is the credit card account. 
This is simply another form of liability account, but 
it's set up so that you can record purchases and pay- 
ments specific to your credit cards. 

How it works. 

Basically, as you enter day-to-day transactions into 
the computer, they're put into a particular electronic 
"journal." In essence, these journals contain, in chron- 
ological order, a record of all of your transactions— 
whether they're payments, deposits, credit card pur- 
chases, transfers or loan payments. In this form, the 
data does nothing. Periodically, however, this data is 
"posted." 

Posting journal entries is a function performed by 
the computer on command. The appropriate account 
balances are updated, and all of the journal entries 
are transferred to your HISTORY file. Once posted, 
the data becomes permanent (corrections can be made 
only by making "reversing" entries). 

The hardest part about using Net Worth is learn- 
ing into which journals your entries should be made. 



Certain transactions require entries to be made in 
more than one journal, and some entries will seem 
sort of weird. For instance, the purchase of an asset 
(let's say, a stereo component system) is treated as a 
transfer, and the transaction is entered into the "trans- 
fers" journal. 

With practice, however, the program becomes sec- 
ond nature. Once mastered. Net Worth allows remark- 
able control over your finances. At any given time, 
it will provide you with printouts of the status of your 
bank accounts, credit card accounts, your budget and 
even an overall statement of net worth (a handy lit- 
tle item when you're applying for a loan). 

The lesser features are far too numerous to list, but 
1 can tell you that they are useful features, not just 
fluff. 

The bottom line. 

I can, without reservation, recommend this pro- 
gram to anyone looking for help with the household 
finances, who's willing to put some time into it. If 
you're not ready to spend this time, or if you're look- 
ing for something simple, then you'd be better served 
by looking elsewhere. In any case, I'm impressed with 
the package. Your Personal Net Worth exceeded my 
expectations. D 



svS«««* 



jSfSSS-SSS»&-< 



\ 




YOU CANT TELL 

A DISK DRIVE 

BY ITS COVER!! 




WITH A HAPPY ENHANCEMENT INSTALLED THESE ARE 
THE MOST POWERFUL DISK DRIVES FOR YOUR ATARI COMPUTER 

WARP SPEED SOFTWARE DISK READING AND WRITING 500% FASTER 

HAPPY BACKUP — Easy to use backup of even the most heavily protected disks 

HAPPY COMPACTOR — Combines 8 disks into 1 disk with a menu 

WARP SPEED DOS - Improved Atari DOS 2. OS with WARP SPEED reading & writing 

SECTOR COPIER — Whole disk read, write and verify in 105 seconds 

1050 ENHANCEMENT — Supports single, 1050 double, and true double density 

810 ENHANCEMENT — Supports single density 

SPECIAL SUGGESTED RETAIL PRICE: Get the HAPPY ENHANCEMENT 810 or 1050 version with the HAPPY BACKUP PROGRAM 
plus the multi drive HAPPY BACKUP PROGRAM, plus the HAPPY COMPACTOR PROGRAM, plus the HAPPY DRIVE DOS plus the 
HAPPY SECTOR COPY, all with WARP DRIVE SPEED, including our diagnostic, a $350.00 value for only $249.95, for a limited time only! 
Price includes shipping by air mail to U.S.A. and Canada. Foreign orders add $10.00 and send an international money order payable through a 
U.S.A. bank. California orders add $16.25 state sales tax. Cashiers check or money order for immediate shipment from stock. Personal checks require 
2-3 weeks to clear. Cash COD available by phone order and charges will be added. No credit card orders accepted. ENHANCEMENTS for other 
ATARI compatible drives coming soon, call for information. Specify 1050 or 810 ENHANCEMENT, all 1050s use the same ENHANCEMENT. 
Please specify -H model for all 810 disk drives purchased new after February 1982, call for help in 810 ENHANCEMENT model selection. Dealers 

now throughout the world, call for the number of the dealer closest to you. ATARI is a registered trademark of Atari Computer inc. 



HAPPY COMPUTERS, INC. 



p. O. Box 1268 



Morgan Hill, California 95037 



(408) 779-3830 



CIRCLE #118 ON READER SERVICE CARD 






Manioc.' 



Slunlman 



Fill 'Er Up 





** 




PAYS 


18 


- — 




PftYS 


£5 






PftVS 


58 


♦ ♦ 


♦ 


PAV5 


76 


1 1 


^ 


PftVS 


58 


■i ■ 


■1 


PftV5 


XBB 


HIX BARS 


PflVS 


lee 


= s: 


ss 


PAYS 


2 SB 
2888 








1 t^M^l 


^KT 




DET:0 


30 
HIN. 


lO 




Dino Battle 



Color Slot Machine 



Cubes 



Where can you get all of these programs 
(and dozens more!) for only $14.95? 



See page 51 to find out. 




Triple Threat Dice 






3'D Graphs 



Sphere Demo 



L - 5ETS PEN SIZE TO LARGE 

H - ^ETS PEN SIZE TO MEDIUH 

5 - SETS PEM SIZE TO SHftLL 

E - SETS PEN TO ER6SE MODE 

- SETS PEN TO DRftW MODE 

H - HELP... LISTS THE COHMOMDS 

1 - STftRTIHG POINT FOR FILL 

2 - ENDING POINT FOR FILL 

F - FILLS THE flREfi HITH COLOR 

C - CHANGES BACKGROUND COLOR 

I - CHANGES BACKGROUND INTEHSITY 

B - CHANGES PEN BRIGHTNESS 

CLEaR< - CLEARS THE SCREEN 

CTRL-L - LOADS PICTURE FROH TAPE 

CTRL-S - SAVES PICTURE TO TAPE 

CTRL-X - EXITS PROGRAH 




Leprechaun King 



Sketch Pad 



Harvey Wallbanger 



PAGE 42 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 




48K Cassette or Disk — Action! cartridge 
by Dan Bullok 



You are the last Wizard of Akturnis, the strange 
and mystical world where magic can be worked by 
anyone with the will to do so. But, in the past few 
years, people have lost their faith in Wizards and mag- 
ic. Now the evil Demon Birds have begun to plague 
them, and you are their only hope. 

To save the people of Akturnis, you must enter the 
dreaded Valley of Death and destroy all of the De- 
mon Birds found there. 

Your Wizard starts the game with four lives and fifty 
units of energy. For every bird you destroy, you will 
gain two units of energy. However, every time you cast 
a fireball, you lose one tinit of energy. 

You move your Wizard left and right at the bottom 
of the screen, using the joystick. You may cast a fire- 
ball by pressing the red button while moving in the 
direction in which you wish it to travel. 



Ridding your people of the Demon Birds will not 
be easy. If you are struck by one of the evil birds, or 
are hit by a meteor from the sky, you will lose one 
life. You'll also lose a life if your energy reaches zero. 
Furthermore, the ground in the valley is very unstable, 
because it sits on top of a pool of lava. If you stand 
in one place for too long, the ground will open up, 
and your Wizard will be lost. 

Disk instructions. 

Type in Listing 1 and SAVE it to disk under 
the filename "D:B1RDS". You must have 48K and 
the Action! cartridge. 

'2. Reboot your computer and enter the moni- 
tor. Type C "BIRDS". 

3. When the disk drive stops, type W "AUTO- 
RUhJ.SYS" to save the object code to disk. 



ISSUE 28 



4. Whenever you want to play Demon Birds, 
insert the Action! cartridge into the left slot. In- 
sert the disk with the AUTORUN.SYS file into 
drive one and turn on the computer. The pro- 
gram will load and run automatically. 

Cassette instructions. 

1. Type in Listing 1 and SAVE it to cassette. 
You must have at least 48K and the Action! car- 
tridge. 

2 . Reboot your computer and enter the moni- 
tor. Type C "C:". 

3. When the cassette stops, type W "C;" to 
save the object code to cassette. 

4. Whenever you want to play Demon Birds, 
insert the Action! cartridge into the left slot. In- 
sert the cassette with the object code into the 
cassette recorder. Turn on the computer and enter 
the monitor. Type R "C;". The program will load 
and run automatically. 

That's all there is to it. You're ready to do battle with 
the Demon Birds. D 



Action! listing. 

;« * 

;* Demon Birds * 

;« by « 
;* Dan Bullok * 
;* » 

• JtMKKJCKKKMJtlCKMlCICICKIC 

:Data For Player e 

6yTE ftRRAY pe=I12 12 12 12 4 12 14 38 
29 45 13 8 e 8 e 182 12 12 
12 12 4 12 14 14 13 38 12 8 8 8 8 8 
8 8 2 58 12 12 12 12 4 12 14 14 14 
38 12 8 8 8 8 8 4 4 8 24 12 12 12 

12 4 12 12 12 14 14 28 8 8 8 8 8 8 
8 48 6 48 48 48 48 32 48 112 128 
184 188 176 88888888 182 48 
48 48 48 32 48 112 112 176 128 48 8 
8 8 8 8 8 8 64 76 48 48 48 48 32 48 
112 112 112 128 48 8 8 8 8 8 32 32 
8 24 48 48 48 48 32 48 48 48 112 
112 56 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 12 961 

;Data For Player 1 

BYTE ftRRAY pl=ie 8 8 8 4 12 14 38 29 

13 12 12 28 28 28 58 34 34 34 182 8 
8 8 8 4 12 14 14 13 14 8 12 12 12 
28 24 28 28 18 58 8 8 8 8 4 12 14 

14 14 14 8 12 12 28 28 8 12 12 8 24 
8 e 8 8 4 12 12 12 14 14 12 12 12 
12 12 28 28 18 58 6 8 8 8 8 32 48 
112 128 184 176 48 48 56 56 48 76 
68 68 68 182 8 8 8 8 32 48 112 112 
176 112 16 48 48 48 56 24 48 48 72 
76 8 8 8 8 32 48 112 112 112 112 16 
48 48 56 56 16 48 48 16 24 8 8 8 8 
32 48 48 48 112 112 48 48 48 48 48 
48 48 72 76 961 

; Meteor Data 
BYTE ARRAY 

ball=t68 126 255 255 255 255 
126 68J , 

bail2C8) ,coordstore(38) 

; Character set 

BYTE ARRAY Chset= 

C8 8880888 
8 32 32 168 168 168 178 178 
178 178 178 178 178 178 178 178 
8 128 128 128 162 178 178 178 



PUTING 


S 












PAGE 43 


128 


128 


128 


136 


136 


168 


178 


178 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


178 


178 


8 


8 


2 


34 


42 


178 


178 


178 


8 


2 


2 


2 


34 


42 


42 


178 


8 


8 


8 


2 


2 


34 


42 


178 


8 


5 


85 


1 


1 


1 


8 


8 


28 


92 


85 


64 


64 


64 


64 


8 


8 


1 


1 


1 


5 


85 


8 


8 


64 


64 


64 


84 


92 


85 


8 


8 


28 


53 


85 


1 


1 


1 


1 


8 


8 


88 


85 


64 


64 


64 


8 


8 


1 


1 


1 


21 


53 


85 


8 


8 


8 


64 


64 


64 


88 


85 


8 


8 


252 


254 


182 


182 


182 


254 


252 


8 


8 


8 


68 


182 


124 


96 


56 


14 


8 


8 


254 


255 


219 


219 


219 


3 


8 


8 


63 


182 


182 


182 


68 


8 


8 


8 


228 


182 


182 


182 


246 


7 


252 


254 


182 


126 


102 


254 


252 


8 


24 


8 


56 


24 


24 


24 


62 


8 


8 


8 


223 


96 


96 


96 


248 


8 


14 


12 


252 


284 


284 


284 


119 


8 


8 


8 


62 


96 


68 


6 


252 


8 


8 


195 


68 


68 


68 


195 


8 


81, 


Chset2= 














[15 


31 


63 


128 128 128 124 127 


248 


252 


252 


28 


28 


28 


28 


228 


127 


124 


124 


126 


126 


126 


126 


68 


228 


28 


28 


28 


28 


28 


28 


8 


126 


126 


127 


127 


121 


121 


124 


124 


8 


28 


28 


28 


156 


156 


228 


228 


126 


126 


127 


127 


127 


127 


127 


62 


252 


124 


124 


68 


68 


28 


28 


8 


96 


112 


112 


112 


112 


112 


112 


128 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


128 


124 


124 


126 


126 


127 


127 


63 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


248 


236 


248 


63 


127 


127 


128 


112 


112 


112 


128 


248 


252 


252 


28 


28 


28 


28 


28 


128 


124 


124 


126 


126 


127 


127 


63 


28 


28 


28 


28 


28 


244 


244 


248 


63 


127 


127 


128 


112 


112 


112 


121 


248 


252 


252 


8 


8 


8 


8 


248 


128 


124 


124 


126 


126 


127 


127 


63 


252 


124 


28 


28 


28 


244 


244 


2483 



; Notes for song 
BYTE ARRAY notes= 

[243 243 162 182 162 182 193 2431 , 

notesl= 

[162 96 188 121 188 121 128 1623, 
dur=[18 18 38 6 6 6 10 201, 
increase=[2 83 



;y-positions of 
BYTE ARRAY stra 
[18 11 12 13 
19 19 18 17 

11 12 11 18 

18 18 18 18 

14 16 17 17 

15 15 14 14 
15 15 14 13 
88 08 88 14 

17 18 18 18 

19 28 28 28 

18 17 17 16 

12 13 14 15 

19 18 16 15 
15 16 17 18 

15 14 13 12 

16 16 17 18 

18 17 17 17 

19 19 19 18 

14 14 14 14 
18 18 19 19 
18 18 17 17 

15 15 14 14 



birds 

fey= 

14 15 16 
16 15 14 

11 11 18 
18 18 18 
18 18 18 

13 13 13 

12 12 11 

14 14 15 
18 18 18 
28 28 28 

15 15 14 

16 18 19 

14 13 12 
18 18 18 
12 12 14 

18 19 19 

17 17 17 
17 17 16 

15 16 16 

19 28 20 

16 16 16 
14 14 14 



17 18 
13 12 

18 18 
07 88 
18 18 

13 14 
18 18 

15 15 

18 18 

19 19 

14 14 
19 28 
12 13 

18 18 

14 14 

19 19 

18 18 

16 15 
16 17 

19 19 

15 15 
14 143 



19 19 
11 18 
10 10 
10 12 

17 16 
14 14 
10 89 

16 16 

18 19 

19 18 
14 12 
28 19 

13 14 

18 16 

14 15 

19 18 
19 19 

15 14 

17 18 
19 19 
15 15 



BYTE ARRAY flapinc=[l 83, bexiSttlB) 

BYTE bcount, Chan, char2,dief lag, bx, 
by,fallx,fally,fallflag,bflap 

;lliscellaneous variables 

BYTE a,b,c,d,e,X=[1883,y=[1543, 



PAGE 44 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



ctr=[eJI,dir, fx, fy, f ire flag, df, 
Mx=[ie] ,M!;=[ioi ,chad,Men=(4] , 
HeHory,gf lag=[ll 

; Hardware registers 

BYTE VCOUnt=54283,COlpfe=5327e, 
COlpf 1=53271, COlpf 2=53272, 
C0lpf3=53273,wsvnc=54282, 
Chbase=54281,randOH=53770, 
consol=53279,rtclock=2e,ch=764 

CARD PMbase,ac,bc,cc,vdslst=5l2, 
dlilvec,score=cei ,energy=[581 



PROC Dli20 

;Changes color of text window to red 

[72 169 68 141 10 
212 141 24 208 
169 141 23 208J 
VdSlSt=dlilvec 
[104 641 
RETURN 



PROC DlilO 

sChanges color of ground to Brown 

[72 169 20 141 10 
212 141 23 208] 
VdSlSt=Dli2 
(104 641 
RETURN 



INT FUNC DeltaXO 

;Returns Delta-K value of stickfO) 

BYTE aa 
INT XX 

aa=StickCO) 

IF aa>12 THEN xx=0 

EL5EIF aa<8 THEN XX=1 dir=80 

ELSE XX=-1 dir=0 

FI 

RETURN tXX) 

PROC Center (CARD cnuM 

BYTE basx,basy) 

;right- justifies nuMber 
IF cnuM<10 THEN 

Position (basx,basv) 

PrintD(6,"0"J 
ELSEIF cnUH<100 THEN 

Posit ion (basx-l,basy) 

PrintD(6,"0"j 
ELSEIF cnuH<ioeo then 

Posit ion Cbasx-2,bas!|} 

PrintD(6,"0"} 
ELSE 

Position (basx-3,basy) 

PrintDce," "i 

FI 

PrintCD(6,cnuM) 

RETURN 



PROC Delay (CARD cnt) 
;Delay Loop 

CARD cnnt 

FOR cnnt=l TO cnt DO OD 

RETURN 



PROC PMOve(CARD PH,add 

BYTE Plr,px,py,pix) 
; Moves Player 
;Variables passed: 
;ph: address of PHbase 
;add: address of source iMage 
;plr: tt of player to Move 0-3 



;px: x-position of player 
;py: y-position of player 
;pix: nuMber of bytes to Move 

px==+48 

py==-»32 ;add screen Margin offsets 

ac=PM-i^ie24+plr«256 ;add work space 

Zero(ac+py-5,pix+l0> ;clear area out 

lloveBlock(aci-py,add,pix} 

P0ke(53248+plr,px} 

RETURN 



PROC BirdPOS 

(BYTE xpos,ypos,charl,char23 
;Puts Two bytes, charl & char2 
;at xpos, ypos on screen 

CARD SCMeM=88 

ac=scHeM'<'Xpos+ (ypos«40) 
Poke (ac, charl) 
Poke(ac+l,char2) 
RETURN 



PROC SongM 

FOR a=e TO 7 DO ;eight notes in song 
b=notes(a) 
c=dur(a) 
d=ie 

e=notesl(a) 
FOR ac=i TO cK4e do 

IF ac MOD 100=0 THEN 

d==-l ;decreMent volUHe 
FI 

Sound (e,b, 10, d) 
Sound (l,e, 10, d) 
OD 

Sound (0,0, 0,0) 
Sound (1,0, 0,0) 
OD 
RETURN 



PROC InitO 

;lnitialize chset,PMg & playfield 

Poke (106, HeMory) ; reset top of HeMory 

Graphics(O) 

Poke(559,0) ;turn ANTIC off 

;Display List 

ac=PeekC(560) 

FOR a=6 TO 24 DO 

Poke(ac+a,4] ;IR Mode 4 
OD 

Poke (ac425, 164) ;DLI & VSCROLL on 
Poke(ac+2e,164) 
Poke(acHh27,34) ; VSCROLL Set 
Poke(ac+28,34) 
;colors 
Poke (706,30) 
Poke (707,14) 
Poke (708, 68) 
Poke (709, 12) 

Poke(7ie,i28) 

Poke (712,128) 

Poke(752,l) ;cursor off 

Poke(82,0) ;Left Margin-o 

; Character Set 

a=Peek(l06)-8 

chad=a 

Poke (106, a) 

Poke (756, a) 

FOR ac=e TO 1023 DO 

b=Peek(S7344+ac) 

Poke(a)(256tac,b) 
OD 

ltoveBlock(a«2564512,chset,224) 
MoveBlock(aK25e+776,chset2,16e) 
;Player Missile graphics 
a==-l6 
Poke (106, a) 
Poke(S4279,a) 
Poke (53277, 3) 
Poke(623,52) 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 45 



PMbase=a*25e 

Zero cpMbase , 2048} 

;Playf ield 

Position fl4,0) 

Print t"r-+«B ItH *•"> 

; above is CTRL-a R5TUUHXYZ 

PositionCe,21) 

Print t" I HTiTmTnnTnTTT"' 

Print C"-iiTnTiTiniimi/ 1 1"> 

; above is CTRL B B D 23-E-s F B B 

Positionce,22} 

Print C" SCORE: flBOeOB") 

PrintEt" MEM: 80"J 

Print*" ENERGY: 00800") 

Center (score, 13, 22} 

Center (energy, 14, 23} 

Position(31,22) 

Print ("8"} 

PrintC(Men) 

;DLl's 

dlilvec=OIil 

vdslst=Dlil 

Poke (54286, 192) 

Poke (559, 62) 

F8R e=e TO 1? DO ;reset x & y values 

coordstore(e)=8 OD 
FOR e=28 TO 29 DO ;randoH wing flaps 

coDrdstore(e}=Rand(2) OD 
fallflag=e ;disable neteor 

RETURN 



PROC cntFireo 

;Continue firing 

cc=PeekC(88) 

bc=fy«48+fx 

sound (8, f y+f y+188,18, f y/2} 

Poke(cc-i'bc,8) ;Erase Fireball 

;Check for Illegal coordinates 

IF fx=2 OR fx=37 OR fy=2 THEN 

firef lag=8 

Sound (0,8,8,8) 

RETURN 
FI 

;lncreHent positions 
fx==+df 
fy==-l 

cc=PeekC(88) 
bc = fy«48Hhfx 

c=Peek(cc+bc) ;Object under fireball 
Poke (cc+bc, 219) ; fireball character 
Delay(3e8) 
IF c THEN ; check what under fireball 

FOR e=e TO 5 DO ;MhiCh bird hit? 
IF bexist(e)=l THEN 
a=:coordstore(e) 
b=coordstore (18+e) 
IF a<fX+2 AND a>fX-2 AND fy=b 
THEN 

bexist(e)=e 

BirdPos(a,b,8,8) 

PMove (PMbase , ba 1 1 2 , 3 , f xK4 , 

fy«8,8);put explosion 
Delay (288) 

FI 

FI 
OD 
Sound(0,158,8,18) 

Delay (3888) 

;Clear player 3 area 

Zero (pHbase+ f y*8«1824 , 8) 

energy==+2 

f iref lag=e 

Sound(8,8,8,0) 

score==+l ; increase score 

Poke(cc+bc,8) 
FI 

Poke(cc+bc,8) 
RETURN 




PROC TitleO 

;Prints out title page 
Graphicsd?) „ ^^ 
Poke (559, 8); turn antic off 



;Dispiay list 
ac=PeekC(5e8) 
Poke(ac+l3,7) 
Poke(ac+15,4) 
Poke(ac+l3,7) 

Poke (756, Chad+2) 

Position(3,2) 

PrintD(6,"ABEFABIJMNQR") 

Position(3,3} 

PrintD(6,"CDGHCDKL0PST") 

POSition(5,5) 

PrintD (6, "PRESENTS") 

Position (4_|8) 

PrintD (6, "QESB ^dEB") 

Position(3,15) 

PrintD (6, "BY DAN BULLOK") 

Position(e,18) 

PrintD (6," press SEm") 

Position(5,. 

PrintDCe," 

PrintD (6, "T^B"} 

;above=space INVERSE CTRL-I J 4spaces 

;CTRL-K L 4spaces CTRL-I J 4spaces 

;CTRL-K L 4spaces CTRL-I J 2spaces 

;PNG stuff 

Poke(53277,3) 

Poke (623, 32) 

Poke(784,2S) 

Poke(785,128) 

Poke (788, 12) 

Poke (789, 92) 

Poke (712, 134) 

PHove(pHbase,p8,8,119,131,28) 

PHove (PMbase, pi, 1,119, 131, 28) 

Poke (559, 62); Turn ANTIC back on 

HHILE consoltte D8 

colpf3=randoH ; flash start 
Hsync=e ;wait for sync 
;scroll colors in DeHon Birds 
colpf2=128-wcount*(rtclock RSH 3) 
IF VCOUnt=34 THEN 
chbase=chad 
C0lpf8=26 
ELSEIF VC0Unt=41 THEN 

chbase=chad-<'2 
ELSEIF VC0Unt=58 THEN 
chbase=chad 
C0lpf8=68 
ELSEIF VC0Unt=65 THEN 

COlpf8=ie8 
FI 
OD 
RETURN 



PROC GaMeOverO 

;GaMe over Hessage 

sndRstO 

gflag=l 

Poke (186, HeHory) 

Poke(623,4} 

Poke(53277,e) 

Graphics(17) 

Poke (559,8) 

P0ke(788,14) 

Poke (789, 78) 

P0ke(718,128} 

POke(711,8) 

Poke (712, 136) 

ac=PeekC(568) 

Poke(ac+9,7) ;Graphics(2) at line 4 

Posit ion (5, 4) 

Pr i ntDE (6 , "L. M'utJi.l'lJa ") 

PositiDn(4,18) ^ 

PrintDE(6, "final 33939") 
Position (7,12) 
PrintD (6, "888888") 
center (sc ore , 18 , 12) 
Position(4,18) _^„_ 
PrintDE(6,"press SDEISl") 
Poke (559, 34) 
NHILE ConsoItt6 DO 

If sync =8 

colpf3=vcount+rtc lock/2 
OD 
RETURN 




IBi I. I' f -/ ./ ,m V t t ' i. JBBBBBBBBBI 
IB! " 1 ^^ I "I *' A ' i^ i MM iBBBBBBBB 
IBb.^ft.k-^ft^^k^^fl^.dUJ.JbJBBBBBBBB 



IBBBBBBBBBr- 



r ^] I iff 



V _ If J 

if i f -J -ni 



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ll 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 47 



PROC NewManC) 

;Haterialize New Wizard 
Zero CpMbase , 2848} 
PokeC7e4,78) PokeC785,78) 
FOR a=8 TO 188 STEP 2 DO 
FOR b=e TO 7 DO 

ba 1 1 2 Cb) =ba 1 1 Cb) l^andoH 
Sound(l,a+a,8,a/l0} 

OD 

PHoveCpMbase,ball2,0,a,y,8) 
PHoveCpMbase,baii2,i,28e-a,y,8) 

OD 

Zero CpHbase, 2848) ; clear pm area 

b=18 

; Materialize nan 

F8R a=8 TO 28 STEP 2 De 
b=18-a/2 

PMove cpMbase , p8+b , 8 , 188 , y+b , a) 
PMove cpHbase , pl+b , 1 , 188 , y+b , a) 

PokeC784,38-a/18) 
PokeC785,148-a/'2) 
FOR C=8 TO 188+a»6 DO 
d=255-C 

Sound CI , d , 18 , ie-a/23 

OD 
OD 

Sound CI, 8, 8, 8) 
P0keC7e4,28} 
Poke C785, 138) 
X=18e 
y=154 

f ireflag=8 
rtclock=8 
RETURN 



PROC DieC) 

; Death of wizard 

;Puts player data in Hissile area 

;and blows player apart into 4 pieces 

BYTE ARRAY iHageC28) 

PokeC7e4,14) 
PokeC785,14) 
;spins player around 

F8R a=e TO 15 DO 

PHove CpMbase, P8+48, 8, x,y, 28) 

PMove cpMbase , pl'i-48 , 1 , x , y , 28) 

Delay Cie88) 

PMoveCpHbase,p8+i2e,8,x,y,28) 

PNovecpMbase,pl-i'l28,l,x,y,2e) 

Delay C1888-a*38) 

SoundCe,155-a«18,18,a) 
OD 

sndRstC) 

Zero CpMbase, 2848) 
FeR a=8 TO 28 DO 

iMageCa)=p8Ca)r.pica) 8D 

FOR a=8 TO 28 DO 

iMageca)=iHageCa) RSH l OD 
HoveB 1 oc k CpMbase'i-888+y , i Mage , 28) 
PokeC7ll,l4) 
;blows player apart 
FOR a=8 TO 188 DO 

Poke C53254 , X-aHh48) 

PokeC53253,X-a/2+48) 

Poke C53252 , x+a/'2+48) 

PokeC53255,x+ai-48) 

Sound ce , a/3 , 8 , a/12} 

DelayCa) 
OD 

SndRstC) 
RETURN 



PROC MoveC) 

;Hove wizard 

ctr==«28 ;iMage counter 

IF ctr=8e THEN 

ctr=8 ;reset counter if too big 
Fl 
x=x+Deltaxc) 

IF X<18 THEN X=18 



ELSEIF X>142 THEN X=142 FI 

IF DeltaXC}=8 THEN 

ctr==-2e ;if player is not Moving 

DelayC258) 

IF ctr>68 THEN ctr=68 FI 

;lf player stood still too long, 

;Hake hiM sink in the Hud 

IF rtClOCk>88 THEN 

BirdposCx/4-1,21,8,8} 

BirdposCx/4HKl,21,8,e) 

SndRstC) 

FOR C=8 TO 24 DO 

PHo ve CpMbase , p8 , 8 , X , y+c , 26-c ) 
PMove CpMbase, pi, l,x,yHhc,26-c) 
Delay C3888) 
SoundC8,C+158,ie,5} 
8D 

SoundCe,8,e,8) 
dief lag=l 
FI 
ELSE 

PokeC28,8) 

PMoveCpMbase,p8+ctr«dir,8,x,y,2e) 
PMove CpMbase,pl+ctr+dir,l,x,y, 28) 

IF Ctr=48 AND DeltaXOttB THEN 

;click feet 

PokeC5327S,e) 

PokeC53279,8) 
ELSE 

Delay C258) 
FI 
IF fireflag THEN 

CntFireC) 
ELSEIF STrigC8)=8 THEN 

fireflag=l 

fx=x/4+I 

fy=28 

df=DeltaXC) 

energy==-l 
ELSE 

Delay C388] 
FI 
RETURN 



PROC GetReadyC) 

Graphics C18) 

PositxonC5,5) 

PrintDce,"GET ready") 

PokeC623,4) ;players behind playfields 

POkeC53277,8) 

FOR ac=l TO 20888 DO 
wsync=8 

colpf8=l28-vcount+rtclock RSH 2 
colpfl=vcount+rtclock RSH 2 

OD 

RETURN 



PROC MainLoopC) 
BYTE MCOUnt,luM 

;lnfinite Loop 
DO 

;7 player Moves to one bird Move 
FOR MCOunt=l TO 7 DO 

IF randOM<l8 and fallfiag=8 THEN 
fallx=RandC148}+ie ;drop Meteor 
fally=ie 
fallflag=l 
ELSEIF fall flag THEN 
fally==+5 
fallx==+RandC5)-2 
FOR b=8 TO 7 D8 ;randOM ball 
balI2Cb)=ballCb)&randoN OD 
PMove CpMbase, bal 12, 2, fallx, 

fally,8) 
soundce,fally,8,fally/l8} 
IF fally>178 THEN ;hit bOttOM? 
fallflag=e 

Zero CpMbase+1536, 256) 
Sound ce, 8, 8, 8) 

FI 
FI 
P0keCS3278,l} ;hitclr 



MoveO 

Poke f 711, randoH) ; flash bird eyes 
;kill wizard 

IF energy=65535 OR Peek (532523=1 
OR dieflagtto OR Peek(53262)tte 

THEN 
i*en==-l 
energy=28 
SndRstC) 
;Turn birds off 
FOR e=e TO 5 DO 
bexist(e)=e 
BirdPos(coordstoreCe), 

coordstore(ei^ie) ,8,0) 
00 

IF Nen=0 OR Hen>ie THEN 
gf lag=e 
EKIT 
ELSE 

IF dieflag THEN 

dief lag=0 
EL5E 

DieO 
FI 

rtclock=0 
GetReadgO 
InitO 
NewMan (} 
PokeC20,e) 
FI 
FI 
OD 
IF gflag=0 THEN 

EMIT 
FI 

; Shake earth 

e=Rand(4) 

P0keC54277,e) 

b=Rand(l8) 

sound tl , 50*b«28 , 8 , e+33 

y=l54-e 

PMowe(pMbase,p8+ctr+dir,8,x,y,28J 



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PNoveCpHbase,pi+ctr^dir,i,x,v,2e) 
;lf a bird isn't on screen, 
;put it there if randoH<30 
F0« e=0 TO 5 DO 

IF bexistce)=8 AND randoM<30 THEN 
bexistce)=l 
IF e MOD 2=0 THEN 
coordstoreCe)=0 
EL5E 

coordstore<e}=39 
FI 
FI 
OD 

; Center score and energy 
center {score , 13, 22) 
Center Cenergy, 14, 23J 
Position{31,22) 
Print C"0"J 
PrintCCHenJ 

; Start Key ends the gane 
; option Key stops the progran 
;Any key pauses gaite 
IF consol=6 THEN 

EXIT 
EL5EIF Consol=3 THEN 
Poke Ciee , neMory) 
GraphicsCO) 
Break O 
ELSEIF Chtt255 THEN 
Ch=255 
leilLE Ch=2S5 

DO OD 
Ch=255 
rtclock=0 
FI 

;Move all 6 birds 
FOR bCOUnt=0 TO 5 DO 
bx=coordstore fbcount) 
by=coordstore (lO+bcount) 
BirdPosCbx,by,0,6) 
IF bexisttbcount)=l THEN 
bflap=coordstoreC20'<-bcount) 
charl=20l+bflap+bflap*4» 

(bcount HOD 2) 
char2=charl+l 
bflap=f lapincCbf lap) 
coordstoreC20+bcount)=bf lap 
bx==+increaseCbcount MOD 2)-l 
IF bx=40 THEN 

bx=8 
FI 
IF bx=255 THEN 

bx=39 
FI 

coordstore Cbcount) =bx 
by=straf ey Cbcount«4e+bx) 
by=by 

coordstore C10+bcount)=by 
BirdPosCbx,by,charl,char2) 
FI 
OD 
OD 
RETURN 



PROC GaMeC) 

MeMory=Peek{ie6) ;Get top of Henory 
DO 

;reset variables 

Men=:4 

5core=0 

Energy=5e 

InitC) 

Titlet) ;Title screen 

InitO 

SongC) 

NewtanO 

NainloopC) 

;play song when gane is over 

GraphicsCl?) 

PokeC712,134} 

POkeCe23,4) 

PokeC53277,e) 

Songc) 

GaneOverO 
OD 
RETURN 



CIRCLE #120 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 49 



Ho. 







Ctiei 



.Aa\n Street^ ^ , 

w 



7).4^^-— 



iga^ NCC1.0. 








jjoM^'"^ 



B' 



rvVaUeV 
.rai Beserve 

Memo -^^^St 5531 



01A10011-^^1_^ 



Part 




by Clayton Walnum 



Welcome to the conclusion of MicroCheck. This 
month, with the addition of the check search pro- 
gram and the account balancer, we will complete the 
system and send you happily on your way. You'll find 
that checking accounts need not lead to nervous dis- 
orders. In fact, you can remove that bottle of Valium 
from your desk drawer. You'll no longer need it. 

I assume that, over the last month, you've been 
frantically writing checks. In fact, you're probably 
reading this with your latest statement clutched in 
your sweaty palm, eager to begin your first computer 
account balancing. So let's go! 

More swollen fingers. 

Listing 1 is the check search program. Type 
it in and SAVE it to your MicroCheck program 
disk under the filename CHECKPRT. 

Listing 2 is the final part of MicroCheck, the 
account balancer. Type it in and SAVE it to your 
program disk under the filename CHECKBAL. 

You are now the proud owner of a complete Micro- 
Check system! 

Needle in a haystack. 

One of MicroCheck's handiest features is its abil- 
ity to find a specific check or group of checks. Boot 
up your MicroCheck program disk. From the main 
menu, choose the SEARCH CHECKS option, then 
press START to run the program. 

After you insert your data disk, the search parameter 
entry form will appear. Prompts at the bottom of the 
screen will guide you as you enter information. 



First, you must enter the starting and ending dates 
for the search. For example, if you wish to search for 
checks from January to March, you would enter 0\ 
as the starting date and Ol as the ending date. If you 
wish to search only one month, enter that month as 
both the starting and ending date. For example, 05 
as the starting date and 05 as the ending date will 
search only the month of May If you don't enter a 
starting or ending date, and just press RETURN, the 
dates 00 and Y2 will be entered automatically. 

You must then enter the check numbers you want 
to find. Numbers must be entered in four digits (i.e., 
0Q0\, 09.97, 8756, etc.). If you'd like to search for 
checks numbered 874 to 967, you would enter 0874 
as the starting number and 0967 as the ending num- 
ber. If you don't enter a starting or ending number, 
and just press RETURN, the word ALL will appear 
as the search parameters. 

Next, the amounts you wish to search for must be 
entered. Any amount from %Qm to $9999.99 will 
be accepted. If you do not enter a starting or ending 
amount, and just press RETURN, the above amounts 
will be entered automatically. 

Finally, the payee to be searched for must be en- 
tered. If you wish, you may enter only the first few 
letters of a payee. For example, if you wish to search 
for checks with Frank's Pizza as the payee, you could 
simply enter FRA as the payee. Of course, if you've 
also written checks to Frannie Smith and Frabble 
Lumber, these will also be fair game for the search. 



PAGE 50 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



If you wish to get a list of your deposits, enter DE- 
POSIT as the payee. 

After the payee has been entered, you will be asked 
if all the entries are okay {OK). Answer by pressing 
Y or N. If you answer N, you'll have to reenter your 
parameters. If you answer Y, you'll be asked if you 
would like a printout. Again, press Y or N. If you an- 
swer N, the checks will be listed only to your TV 
screen. If you answer Y, the checks will be listed to 
both the screen and your printer. 

Once a search has been started, it may be aborted 
at any time by holding down the OPTION key. 

When the search is completed, you will be asked 
if you wish to search again or return to the main 
menu. 

Some search examples. 

Let's say you want to search for all checks written 
to Frank's Pizza. Since you want to look through ev- 
ery month, you just press RETURN for the starting 
and ending dates. The months 00 and 12 are entered 
automatically. 

You don't care what the check number is either, so 
press RETURN twice. The word ALL is automatically 
entered as the starting and ending number. 

You're not interested in the amount (at least, not 
as a search parameter), so, again, press the RETURN 



key twice. The amounts $0.00 and $9999.99 are en- 
tered automatically. 

Enter FRANK in the payee field and press RE- 
TURN. When asked if the entries are okay, press Y. 
When asked if you want a printout, answer N (un- 
less, of course, you do want a printout). The search 
now begins, and any checks made out to Frank's Pizza 
will appear on the screen. 

Now, let's try something a little more complicated. 
Let's say you want to find all checks written from the 
month of March to the end of June, with amounts 
between $10.00 and $100.00. 

For the starting and ending dates, enter 03 and 06, 
respectively. For the starting and ending numbers, just 
press RETURN. The word ALL is automatically en- 
tered in both number fields. For the starting and end- 
ing amounts, enter JO and JOO. For payee, simply press 
RETURN. The word ALL appears as payee. Press Y 
if your entries are satisfactory. Answer N for a print- 
out, and the search begins. All checks that fit the 
above parameters will be printed to the screen. 

Cursing and whining revisited. 

One of the most frustrating parts of having a check- 
ing account is reconciling it at the end of the month. 
The frustration level is in direct proportion to the 
number of checks written. If you write more than fif- 



Attention Programmers! 

ANALOG Computing is interested in programs, articles, and software review sub- 
missions dealing with the Atari home computers. If you feel that you can write as 
well as you can program, then submit those articles and reviews that have been 
floating around in your head, awaiting publication. This is your opportunity to share 
your knowledge with the growing family of Atari computer owners. 

ANALOG pays between $30.00-$360.00 for all articles. All submissions for publi- 
cation must be typed, upper and lower case with double spacing. Program listings 
should be provided in printed form, and on cassette or disk. By submitting articles 
to ANALOG Computing, authors acknowledge that such materials, upon accep- 
tance for publication, become the exclusive property of ANALOG. If not accepted 
for publication, the articles and/or programs will remain the property of the author. 
If submissions are to be returned, please supply a self-addressed, stamped enve- 
lope. All submissions of any kind must be accompanied by the author's full address 
and telephone number. 

Send programs to: 
Editor, ANALOG Computing, P.O. Box 23, Worcester, MA 01603. 



From the editors of 
A.N.A.L.O.G. Computing 





1^^^^^^^^^^^ 




1 


■ m 






1 


H 




bL 




FIB>IFILDG 



COMPENDIUM 



The best ATARI® Home Computer Programs from the first ten issues of A.N.A.L.O.G. Computing Magazine. 









m ATARI 




iV.^.4 



- (I r*^, r*|| V»»S 



The ANALOG Compendium is available at selected book and computer stores, or you can order it direct. Send 
a check or money order for $14.95 + $2 shipping and handling to: ANALOG Compendium, P. O. Box 615, Holmes, 
PA 19043. 

Or you can order by phone with MasterCard or VISA. Call toll free: 1-800-345-8112 (in PA, call 
1-800-662-2444) For orders outside the U.S., add an additional $5 air mail, $2 surface. 



PAGE 52 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



teen a month, your desk is almost certainly cluttered 
with little clumps of hair which you've removed — 
none too gently — from your scalp. 

Well, cancel your appointment for hair transplants! 
MicroCheck will be delighted to help you balance 
your account, and since it doesn't have any hair, your 
desk will be much neater. 

To balance your account, simply select the BAL- 
ANCE ACCOUNT option from the main menu. 
Press START to run the program. 

Enter your ending balance and the month you wish 
to work on, as prompted. You'll find your ending bal- 
ance somewhere on the bank statement. It is not the 
last balance in your checkbook. Also remember that, 
if you've started a new year recently, there may be 
checks in month #0 that need to be cleared. 

If there are no checks entered for the month re- 
quested, you will see the message NO ENTRIES FOR 
THIS MONTH. 

At the top of the screen are the commands used 
with the account balancer. Press C to move the cur- 
sor. Press * to cancel or uncancel a check. Press M 
to toggle between a check and its memo. Press P to 
see the next page of entries. Press N to work on a 
new month. Press E to end your work and balance 
the account. 



WANT 

TO 

SUBSCRIBE? 



It's worth it. 



CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-345-8112 

In Pennsylvania 

1-800-662-2444 



You balance your account with MicroCheck the 
same way you do it by hand. The only difference is 
that, now, the computer will do all the figuring for 
you. Go through your bank statement item by item. 
Press the * for each entry cleared by the bank. When 
you've cleared all the items in one month, press N 
to work on another. When all the transactions on 
your statement have been accounted for, press the E 
— and watch the computer go to work. 

When MicroCheck has finished its calculations, 
it will display a final report. If all is well, you'll be 
rewarded by a short musical interlude. If the account 
doesn't balance, you'll be given a "raspberry." If the 
latter happens, please don't punch out your computer. 
It's not its fault! 

Good-bye. 

Just one final suggestion . . . It's a good practice to 
keep a backup copy of your data. Your checking in- 
formation is too important to risk losing it to a silly 
accident. Every time you update your account, you 
should update your backup (use the J option of Atari 
DOS to copy the disk). Keep the backup stored away 
from the original. That way, the aforementioned silly 
accident won't wipe out both disks in one shot. 

Well, that's about it. MicroCheck is now in your 
hands. I hope you'll get as much use out of it as I 
have, n 



Listing 1. 

le GOTO 1580 

30 I-PEEKC16J :IF I>127 THEN I=:I-128:P0 

KE 16,I:P0KE 53774,1 

50 RETURN 

70 OPEN ttKl,K4,K0,"K:":P0KE 764,255:P0 

KE 702,64:P0KE 694, KO 

80 A=PEEKC7e4):IF A=255 THEN 80 

90 IF A=39 OR A=60 OR A=103 OR A=124 T 

HEN SO 

100 GET ttKl,A:CL05E ttKl:RETURN 

120 L=KO:TEHP$="":POKE 764,255 

130 G05UB IN2 SPOKE 752,K0:IF A=155 THE 

N POKE 752, Kl: RETURN 

140 IF A=126 THEN 170 

158 L=L+Kl:IF L>L1 THEN RETURN 

160 POSITION C0L+L-K1,R0H:? CHR5CA);:T 

EHP$fL,L}=CHR$fA) :G0T0 130 

170 IF L>KO THEN ? CHRS C126> ; :L=L-K1:I 

F NOT L THEN TEMPS="" 

180 IF L>Ke THEN TEI1PS=TEHP$ CK1,U 

190 GOTO 130 

210 FOR X=K1 TO LEN CTEIff>$) :IF TEMPS (X, 

H3 <>".■■ THEN NEXT X : TEW* tXJ =" .00":RET 

URN 

220 IF LENCTEMPS)=X THEN TEMPS CX*K1,X+ 

22} ="08" 

230 IF LEHCTEMPS>=X*K1 THEN TEMPS fX+K2 

,X+K2J="0" 

248 RETURN 

260 SOUND Ke,50,10,K8:F0R X=K1 TO 2e:N 

EXT X:SOUND KO,KO,KO,KO:RETURN 

280 SOUND K0,100,12,K8:FDR X=K1 TO 25: 

NEXT X:SOUND KO.KO, KO, KO :RETURN 

308 POKE 752, Kl: POSITION 9,K6:? "■":L1 

=K2 : C0L=9 : RDH=K6 : POSITION COL , RON 



318 GOSUB SNDl: POSIT ION 27.18:? 

":P05ITI0N 23,19:? " tAI--1AHlt ri 

320 GOSUB IN: IF TEMPS="" THEN TEMPS="0 

0" 

330 DATES=TEMPS 

340 FOR X=K1 TO LEN CDATES) : IF DATES CX, 

X3<"0" OR DATESfX,XJ>"9" THEN 370 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 53 



350 NEXT X:FIR5TM0N=VALCDATE$):IF FIRS 

TH0N>12 THEN 378 

366 POSITION COL, ROM:? " ":POSITION C 

OL,ROH:? DATE$:GOTO 380 

378 GOSUB SND2: POSITION C0L,R0H:? " " 

:G0T0 388 

388 GOSUB SNDl: POSITION 9,K7:? •V;:RO 

H=K7 

398 P0SITI8N 23,19:? " [iUliaa 



488 GOSUB IN: IF TEMPS="" THEN TEMP$="1 

2" 

418 »ATE$=TEHP$ 

428 FOR X=K1 TO LENCpATE$) :IF DATE$(X, 

XJ<"8" OR DflTEStX,X>>"9" THEN 458 

438 NEXT X:LASTMON=VALCDATE$) :IF LASTH 

ON<FIRSTHON OR LASTM0N>12 THEN 458 

440 POSITION COL.ROH:? POSITION C 

OL,ROH:? DATE$:RETURN 

450 GOSUB SND2: POSITION COL,ROH:? " " 

:GOTO 380 

470 POSITION 27, K6:? "■"; :C0L=27 :ROH=K 

6:L1=K4 

480 GOSUB SNPl; POSITION 22,19:? "SEIS 

498 GOSUB IN: IF TEHP*="" THEN TEIfl»5="A 

HY":FIRSTCH=-Kl:GOTO 548 

588 IF LENCTEHP$}<K4 THEN 558 

518 CHNUM$=TENP$ 

528 FOR X=K1 TO K4:IF CHNUMJ^ CX,X)<"e" 

OR CHNUHSCX,X}>"9" THEN 558 

538 NEXT X:FIRSTCH=VALCCHNUN$) 

548 POSITION COL, ROM:? TENP$:GOTO 568 

550 GOSUB SND2:P0SITI0N COL,ROH:? " 

":GOTO 478 

568 POSITION 27, K7:? "■"; :R0M=K7 

578 GOSUB SNDl: POSITION 22,19:? " HGEH 

ll|:Bll'i;n4J " ^ 

588 GOSUB IN: IF TEMP$="" THEN TEI«»$="A 

NY":LASTCH=9999:G0T0 630 

598 IF LEN(TEHP$}<K4 THEN 648 

688 CHNUNS=TEMP$ 

618 FOR X=K1 TO K4:IF CHNUH:SCX,X)<"8" 

OR CHNUH$CX,X)>"9" THEN 648 

628 NEXT X:LASTCH=UALCCHNUH$) :IF LASTC 

H<FIRSTCH THEN 648 

638 POSITION COL,ROH:? TEMP$:RETURN 

648 GOSUB SND2:P0SITI0N COL, RON:? " 

":G0T0 568 
668 POSITION 9,13:? "I"; : C0L=9 :R0H=13 : 
L1=K7: POSITION COL, ROM 
678 GOSUB SNPl ; P=K7; POSITION 22,19:? " 

688 GOSUB IN: IF TEMP$="" THEN TEMPS="0 
.88": GOTO 738 

698 FOR X=K1 TO LENCTEfflPS) : Af =TEMP$ CX) 
:IF CAS<"8" or AS>"9") and AS<>"." THE 
N 768 

700 IF tk$="." THEN D=X 

710 NEXT X:IF LENCTEHP5)>D+K2 THEN 760 
728 G8SUB DOLFORMAT 

738 AI10UNT$=TEHP$ : LOAMNT=VAL CAHOUNT$} 
740 IF LOAtWT<Ke OR L0AHNT>9999 .99 THE 
N 768 

758 POSITION COL, RON:? " ";POSIT 
ION COL, RON:? AMOUNTS:GOTO 778 
768 G8SUB SND2:P0SITI0N COL, RON:? " 
":GOTO 660 

778 POSITION 9,14:? "■"; :R0M=14 

780 GOSUB SNDl:POSITION 22,19:? " J3SBB 

IiL-w=i:tjiiiB " 

798 GOSUB IN: IF TEMP$="" THEN TEMPS="9 

999. 99": GOTO 848 

888 FOR X=K1 TO LEN CTEMP$} : IF CTEHP$ CX 

,XJ<"8" OR TEMPSCX,XJ>"9"} AND TEHP$CX 

,XJ<>"." THEN 880 

818 IF TEMPS CX,X)="." THEN D=X 

828 NEXT X:IF LENCTEMP$)>D+K2 THEN 888 

838 GOSUB DOLFORIMT 

848 ANOUNT$=TEI«>$ : HIAHNT=VAL CAHOUNT$} 

858 IF HIAiaiT>9999.99 THEN 888 

878 IF HIAMNT>=LOANNT THEN POSITION CO 

L,ROH:? " ":POSITION COL,ROH:? A 

MOUNTS: RETURN 

888 GOSUB SND2:P0SITI0N COL, RON:? " 

":60T0 778 
988 POSITION 28,13:? "■"; :C0L=28 : R0H=1 
3 :L1=15: POSITION COL, ROM 



918 GOSUB SNDl: POSITION 23,19:? " /T 

ECH3 " , 

928 GOSUB IN: IF TEMPS="" THEN TEI«>S="A 

NY" 

930 PAYEE1$=TEHP$: POSITION COL, ROM:? B 

$(23) : POSITION COL, ROM:? PAYEE1$:RETUR 

N 

948 GOSUB 308: GOSUB 478: GOSUB 668:G0SU 

B 908 

958 P0SITI8N 28,18:? B$C19) :P8SITI0N 2 

8,19:? B$C19) : POSITION K2,19:? "ALL EN 

TRIES OK?" 

968 GOSUB IN2:IF A=:ASC("Y") THEN 1088 

978 IF A<>ASC("H"} THEN 968 

988 POSITION 9,K6:? POSITION 9,K7 

:? " ":P0SITI0N 27, K6:? " ":P0SITI 
ON 27, K7:? " " 

998 POSITION 9,13:? B$ (31) : POSITION 9, 
14:? B$ (31) : POSITION 28,13:? B$(23):P0 
SITI8N K8,19:? B$(19):GeT0 940 
1880 POSITION K8,19:? B$ (19) 
1810 POSITION 22,18:? " DO YOU MANT 
": POSITION 24,19:? "A PRINTOUT?" 
1828 GOSUB IN2:IF A=ASC ("V") THEN PRNT 
=Kl:GOTO 1048 

1838 IF A<>ASC("N") THEN 1828 
1848 GRAPHICS 17: GOSUB DISBRK:POKE 712 
,144:P0KE 718,12 
1858 POSITION K1,K6:? »K6;" 
^POSITION K1,K8:? ttK6; 



IF, AT 6NY 
YOU WISH 



THE SEARCH, 
DOMN 



TIME, 

TO 6B0RT 



1868 POSITION Kl,18:? ttK6;' 
■!M1»': POSITION Kl,12:? ttK6;"| 

1878 FOR X=K1 TO 500: NEXT X 

1888 GRAPHICS K8: GOSUB DISBRK:POKE 718 

,166: POKE 752,Kl:C=K8:PC=K5 

1898 POSITION Ke.KoY? "— BBO— EmCB 

HBEI3M3HHHHHHH330MF^?^^^^^^^^^^ 

1188 TRAP 1848 

1118 IF PRNT THEN LPRINT :LPRINT :LPRI 

NT " CHtt AMNT PAYEE 

ICHO DATE" 
1120 IF PRNT THEN LPRINT " 



.. . LPRINT 

1130 TRAP 40888 

1148 FOR MONTH=FIRSTmN TO LASTMON 
1150 IF M0NTH<18 THEN M0NTHFILE$(K8,K8 
) ="8" ; M0NTHFILE$ (9 , 9) =STR$ (MONTH) : GOTO 

1178 
1168 MONTHFILE$ (K8 , 9) =STR$ (MONTH) 
1178 CLOSE ttK2:0PEN ttK2,K4,K8,M0NTHFIL 
E$ 

1188 INPUT ttK2; CHECKS: IF CHECK$="END" 
THEN NEXT MONTH: GOTO 1398 
1190 IF PEEK (53279) =K3 THEN CL8SE ttK2 : 
GOTO 1868 

1288 TRAP 1218 :AMNT=UAL (CHECKS (35, 41)) 
: N=UAL (CHECKS (K2 , K5) ) : TRAP 48880 : GOTO 
1230 

1210 IF FIRSTCH=-K1 THEN 1240 
1220 GOTO 1188 

1230 IF N<FIRSTCH OR N>LASTCH THEN 118 
8 

1240 IF AMNT<LOAtttiT OR AMNT>HIAMNT THE 
N 1188 

1258 PAYEE$=CHECKS(14,34):IF PAYEElS=" 
ANY" THEN 1278 

1268 IF LEN(PAYEElS}>LEN (PAYEES) OR PA 
YEES(K1,LEN(PAYEE1S)}<>PAYEE1S THEN 11 
88 

1278 DATES=CHECKS(K6,18) : AmUNTS=CHECK 
$ (35 , 41) : CS=CHECK$ : CHNUMS=CHECKS (K2 , K5 
) :MEH0S=CHECKS(42,63) 

1288 IF CHNUM$="DEP " THEN DEPrDEP*Kl: 
DEPAMNT=DEPAMNT+VAL(AM8UNT$) :G8T8 1388 
1298 CHECK=CHECK+K1 : CHAHNT=CHAmiT+UAL ( 
AMOUNTS) 
1300 FOR X=K1 TO K7:IF AMOUNTS (X, X) <>" 

" THEN NEXT X:GOTO 1328 
1310 TEI«>S=AMOUNTS : AIWUNTS (9-X , K7) =TEM 
PS : AMOUNTS (Kl , KO-X) =BS (Kl , K8-X) 
1328 C=C+K1:IF PRNT THEN PC=PC+K1:IF P 
C>62 THEN FOR X=K1 TO K5: LPRINT :NEXT 
X : PC— K2 
1338 IF NOT PRNT AND C>18 THEN 1378 



PAGE 54 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



1348 ? CS|" ";CHllllH$:" ";ft»WUllTS;" ";P 

ftYEE$CKl,i5J;'' •■; DATES 

1358 IF PRMT THEM LPRINT ;" ■';CS;" 

";CHNUlt$;" ":OHOUllT$;" ";PftYEE$;" ";ME 

H0$;" ":DftTES 

1368 GOTO 1180 

1378 POSITION K8,22:? "PRESS AMY KEY T 

CONTINUE" :GOSUB IN2 

1380 FOR X=K2 TO 22: POSITION K2,X:? B$ 

:NEXT X:C=Ke: POSITION K2,K2:G0T0 1328 

1390 IF PRNT AND PC>59 THEN FOR X=K1 T 

e7-PC:LPRINT :NEXT X 

1408 IF NOT PRNT AND OlS THEN 1528 

1418 TEHP$=STR$CCHAHNT} :GOSUB DOLFORHA 

T:? :? " ";CHECK;" DEBITS TOTALING 

5"; TEMP* 

1428 TEMPS=STR$fDEPAIMT) :GOSUB DOLFORM 

AT:? :? " ";DEP;" CREDITS TOTALING 

S";TEMP$ 

1430 if prnt then lprint : lprint " 

"; check;" debits t 
OTALING S";CHAIttlT 
1448 IF PRNT THEN LPRINT " 

";DEP;" CREDITS TOTALING $ 
";DEPANNT 
1458 POSITION 9,23:? "H=HENU S=SEARCH 

AGAIN"; 
1460 CLOSE ttK2:G0SUB IN2:IF A=ASCC"S") 

THEN 1670 
1478 IF A<>ASCC"H") THEN 1468 
1480 GRAPHICS 17:G0SUB DISBRK : POSITION 

K3,K5:? ttK6;"please insert": POSITION 

K3,K7:? ttK6;''progran disk" 

1498 POSITION K3,16:? ttK6 ; "[IQ^gErnBJ 
(lff':GOSUB IN2:TRAP 1558 : RUN ■^TffilTlP^ 
1588 OPEN ttKl,K4,Ke,"K:":GET ttKl,A:CLO 
SE ttKl:RUN "D:MENU" 

1518 GOSUB IN2:TRAP 1558: RUN "D:HENU" 
1528 POSITION K8,22:? "PRESS ANY KEY T 
CONTINUE": GOSUB IN2 

1530 FOR X=K2 TO 22: POSITION K2,X:? B$ 
:NEXT X:GOTO 1418 

1 558 GRAPHICS 17: POSITION K4,K8:? ltK6: 
Hfiaa": POSITION K7,10:? ttK6;"Cl 



1560 POSITION Ke,12:? ttK6 ; "(MiSSIi]" : s 
OUND K8,188,12,K8:F0R X=K1 TO 188:NEXT 

X:SOUND K8,K8,K8,K8 
1578 FOR X=K1 TO 588:NEXT X:GOTO 1488 
1588 Kl=l : K2=2 : K3=3 : K4=4 : K5=5 : K6=6 : K7= 
7 : K8=8 : DIM MONTHFILE$ C13) , TEMPS f 63) , DA 
TES f KB) , CHNUMS C4) , CS CKl) , AS CKl) 
1590 DIM AmUNTSCK?) , PAYEES C28),PAYEE1 
S C28) , BS €37) , CHECKS C63) . l^mS C21) 
1608 BS=" ":BSC37)=BS:BSCK2)=BS 
1618 M0NTHFILES=:"D: MONTH .DAT" 
1620 IN=128 : D0LF0RMAT=218 : SND1=268 : SND 
2=288 

1638 DISBRK=38:IN2=78 
1648 GRAPHICS 17: GOSUB DISBRK : POSITION 

K3,K8:? ttK6;"please insert": POSITION 
K3,18:? ttK6;"your data disk" 
1658 POSITION K3,l2:? ltK6; "into drive 
ttl": POSITION K3,22:? tlK6 ; '■ fgaaWiVt'Ti J 
Gi": GOSUB IN2 

1668 TRAP 1918:0PEN ttK2,K4,K0,"D: MONTH 
81. DAT": CLOSE ttK2:TRAP 40888 
1678 DEP=Ke : CHECK=Ke : DEPAHNT=Ke : CHAMNT 
=KQ:PRNT=K8 

1688 GRAPHICS K8:P0KE 559, KO: GOSUB DIS 
BRK : DL=PEEK 1568) +25e«PEEK €561) +23 
1698 FOR X=DL TO DL+K4:P0KE X,K6:NEXT 
X:POKE 1546, KO SPOKE 1555,15 
1780 POKE 718,146:P0KE 752,K1:P0KE 788 
, 248 : POKE_aiJSA^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



1710 ? 



1728 ? "llRtTE 
H":?_"il- 



II 



1738 ? 
11 



ilR 



ROM: 



1748 



-I" 



TO: 



IICHECK tt 
—Hi- 



ll FROM: 
III 



TO: 




1838 POKE 82, K2: POKE 559, 34: GOTO 948 
1848 GRAPHICS liSJfiStyiBJUSftRK: POSITION 

K3,9:? ttK6 ; '■finrairaiggftrfta-M'' -. position 
K3,12:? ttK6; "PRESS ANY KEY" 
1858 SOUND K8,158,12,K8:F0R X=K1 TO 18 
8:NEXT X:SOUND K8,K8,K8,Ke:G0SUB IN2:G 
OTO 1088 
1868 GRAPHICS 18: GOSUB DISBRK: POSITION 

K2,K2:? tlK6; "search ab orted"; POSITION 

5,K8:? iiK6;"rwimEEaEh' __™. 

1878 POSITION K6,18:? ttK6 ; "CEEinS" 

1888 GOSUB IN2:IF A=ASC C"M") THEN 1488 

1898 IF A=ASCC"S") THEN 1678 

1988 GOTO 1888 

1918 CLOSE ltK2 ; GRAPHIC S 17: POSITION K4 

,K8:? ttKe:"i£QaDaEIiil": POSITION K4,18 

:? ttK6;"Q|Mi croc heck" 

1928 POSITION 5,12:? ttK6 ; " tgJJTilWanP '' ; 
SOUND K8,18e,12,K8:F0R X=K1 TO ieO:NEX 
T X:SOUND Ke,K8,K8,K8 
1938 FOR X=K1 TO 588: NEXT X:GOTO 1648 



CHECKSUM DATA. 

(see page 24) 

18 DATA 672,193,768,982,55,198,221,781 

,375,698,342,354,384,493,719,7131 

218 DATA 52,837,933,595,858,146,551,64 

9,348,238,466,498,195,124,765,7231 

398 DATA 916,349,226,459,967,94,136,38 

5,738,83,577,451,754,338,289,6586 

558 DATA 565,589,884,992,683,458,752,6 

73,187,566,156,928,577,354,867,8983 

718 DATA 910,32,428,625,669,769,388,91 

1,1,436,972,928,37,487,967,8464 

878 DATA 144,781,366,458,343,645,778,6 

34,828,414,976,897,592,938,531,9381 

1830 DATA 322,871,328,728,425,288,126, 

678,982,56,877,235,165,498,347,6918 

1188 DATA 216,535,698,487,721,237,644, 

566,796,927,184,478,696,96,978,8171 

1338 DATA 574,836,282,728,677,591,686, 

554,841,861,774,857,191,2,347,8721 

1488 DATA 67,884,988,933,678,118,108,1 

2 , 846 , 694 , 181 , 596 , 228 , 667 , 861 , 7773 

1648 DATA 158,287,118,890,686,42,853,7 

5, 698, 399, 951, 958, 96, 891, 14, 7892 

1798 DATA 487,223,131,950,598,414,448, 

399,657,613,554,747,716,581,856,8286 



-■■L. 



Listing 2. 



18 M8=8 : Nl=l : M2=2 : H3=3 : N4=4 : M5=5 : W6=6 ; 

M7=7 : N8=8 : N9=9 : N18=18 : Nll=ll : N12=12 : Nl 

3=13 : N14=14 : N15=15 : N16=16 : N17=17 

28 N20=2e:G0T0 218 

58 SOUND H8,ie8,N12,N8:F0R X=N1 TO 175 

:NEKT X:SOUND Ne,NO,Ne,NO:RETURN 

68 FOR X=N1 TO 85: NEXT X: RETURN 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 55 



ee OPEN ttNl,N4,Ne,"K:":P0KE 764,255:P0 

KE 762,64: POKE 6?4,Ne 

98 A=PEEKC764> :IF A=255 THEN 90 

leO IF A=39 OR A=60 THEN POKE 764,255: 

GOTO 90 

110 GET ttNl,A:CLOSE ttNl: RETURN 

130 I=PEEKfN16) :IF I>127 THEN 1=1-128: 

POKE N16,I:P0KE 53774,1 

140 RETURN 

160 FOR X=N1 TO LEN tTEMP$) : IF TEHPSCX, 

XJ <>"."■ THEN NEXT X : TEMPS fXJ =" .08" : RET 

URN 

170 IF LENtTEMP$J=X THEN TEMP$ CX+N1J=" 

88" 

188 IF LEN(TEMP$)=X+N1 THEN TEHP$(X+N2 

)="0" 

190 RETURN 

280 REM »i:i**W»M* 

210 DIM MONTHFILES CH13 J , CHECKS C63} , CHE 

CKNUMS CN4) , DATES (N8} 

220 DIN PAYEES (21), AMOUNTS CN8},CS(N1), 

MONTHDATS (6308] , BS (39) 

238 DIM NEMOS (21), TEMPFILES(N14),BALAN 

CES (N8) , DIFS (N8} , TEMPS (N8) , EBALS (N8) , U 

CANNTS (N8) , UCDANNTS (NB) 

240 BS(N1)= BS(39)=BS:BS(N2)=BS 

258 INDEX=N1 : UNCAN=N8 : UCAMNT=N8 : UCDEP= 
N8 : UCDAHNT=N8 : DOLF0RMAT=168 : BRKDI5=138 
: SND1=S0 : START=N8 : 5VE=N8 
268 GRAPHICS N17:G05UB BRKDIS : POSITION 

N3,N8:? ttN6;"please insert": POSITION 
N3,N10:? ttN6;"!iour data disk" 
278 POSITION N3,N12:? ttN6; "into drive 

1": POSITION N3,22:? ttN6 ; "QHlSKEiam 

|":GOSUB 88 
288 TRAP 1558: OPEN ttN2,N4,N8,"D :M0NTH8 
1. DAT": CLOSE ttN2 
298 GRAPHICS N17:G0SUB BRKDIS 
295 DL=PEEK (568) +PEEK (5ei}«256+N4 : POKE 

DL+N11,N2:P0KE DLtN13,N2:P0KE 87,Ne:P 
OKE 82, N8: POKE 752, Nl 

388 IF NOT START THEN TRAP 388:P0SITI 
ON N6,N5:? "ENDING BALANCE";" ** 
*+***"; :INPUT EBAL:START=N1 
318 TRAP 318: POSITION 38, N6:? " ":P 
OSITION 26, N6:? "HHICH MONTH"; : INPUT M 
ONTH 

320 IF H0NTH<N8 OR M0NTH>N12 THEN 318 
330 NONTHFILES="D: MONTH .DAT" 
348 IF M0NTH<N18 THEN MONTHFILES (N8,N8 
) ="0" : MONTHFILES (N9 , N9) =STRS (MONTH) : GO 
TO 368 

358 I«NTHFILES(N8,N9)=STRS (MONTH) 
360 CLOSE ttN2:0PEN nN2, N4,N8,M0NTHFILE 
S:POKE 82, N2 

370 INPUT ttN2; CHECKS: IF CHECKS="END" T 
HEN 398 

388 C0UNT=COUNT+Nl : MONTHDATS (C0UNT»63- 
62,C0UNT«63]=CHECKS:G0T0 370 
398 GRAPHICS N8:G0SUB BRKDIS:POKE 559, 
N8 : DL=PEEK (568) +256«PEEK (561) +N4 
488 POKE DL-N1,78:F0R X=DL+N2 TO DL+N4 
: POKE X N6:NEXT X 

410 POKE 788,N14:P0KE 789,N18:P0KE 718 
,112:P0KE 711,N0:P0KE 712, N6 
428 POKE 1546, NO: POKE 1547, NO 

8 POK E 752 . HI: POSITION N2,N8:? "C3I!1 



448 POSITION 22, N8:? 
:POSITION N2,N1:? ^ 
458 POSITION Ne,N2;? 




46^P0SITI0iyi8^2JL 

478 POKE 559, 34: POSITION N15,N3:? "MON 

TH It"; MONTH 

488 IF COUNT=Ne THEN ? :? " B:!!^^:!! 

iGOTO 598 



RIE5 FOR THIS MONTH 



498 R=N5:C=N1:P=N8 

588 CHECKS=M0NTHDATS (C«63-62 , C«63) 

518 CHECKNUNS=CHECKS(N2.N5) :DATES=CHEC 

kI (N6, N13) : PAYEES=CHECKS (N14 , 34) : AMOUN 

TS=CHECKS (35 , 41) : CS=CHECKS (Nl , Nl) 

520 FOR X=N1 TO N7:IF AMOUNTS (X,X) <>" 

" THEN NEXT X : GOTO 540 

530 TEMPS=AM0UNTS : AMOUNTS (N9-X , N7) =TEM 

PS : AMOUNTS (Nl , N8-X) =6$ (Nl , N8-X) 



548 POSITION N2,R:? CS;" ";CHECKNUMS;" 

S";AM0UNTS;" "; PAYEES (Nl, N15) ;" ";DAT 
ES(N1,N5]; 

550 R=R+Nl:C=C+Nl:IF R<N2e AND C<=COUH 
T THEN 500 
560 R=N5 

570 IF C-N1>C0UNT THEN C=H1 
580 POSITION N8,R:? "=>" 
598 OPEN nNl,N4,N8,"K:":GET ttNl,A:CLOS 
E ttNl 

688 IF COUNT=Ne AND (A<>ASC("N") AND A 
<>ASC("E")) THEN 598 
618 IF A=ASC("C") THEN 688 
628 IF A=ASC("*") THEN 728 
630 IF A=ASC("M") THEN 908 
648 IF A=ASC("P") THEN 758 
658 IF A=ASC("N") THEN 798 
660 IF A=ASC("E") THEN 790 
678 GOTO 598 

688 0LDR=R:R=R+N1:IF R>22 THEN R=N5 
698 IF R>C-P»H15+N3 THEN R=N5 
788 POSITION N8,0LDR:? " ": POSITION N 
0,R:? "=>":POKE 53279, N8 
718 INDEX=R-N4+P«N15:G0T0 598 
728 SUE=Nl:LOCATE N2,R,Z:IF Z=ASC("«") 

THEN 748 
730 POSITION N2,R:? "«": MONTHDATS (INDE 
X»63-62 , INDEX«63-62) ="*" : GOTO 686 

748 POSITION N2,R:? MONTHDATS (INDE 

X«63-62,INDEX»63-62)-" ":GOTO 680 

758 FOR X=N5 TO C-P*N15+H4 : POSITION NO 

,X:? bS; :NEXT X 

760 P=PHhNl:INDEX=P»N15tNl:IF C=N1 THEN 

498 
778 IF OCOUNT THEN P=Ne:INDEX=Nl :C=N1 
788 R=N5:G0T0 500 

798 IF NOT SVE THEN CLOSE ttN2:G0T0 88 
8 

888 POKE 559. Ne 

818 TEMPFILES=NONTHFILES : TEMPFILES (Nil 
,N13)="TMP": CLOSE ttNl: OPEN ttNl,N8,Ne,T 
ENPFILES 

820 FOR X=N1 TO COUNT:? ttNl;NONTHDATS( 
X«63-62,XK63) :NEXT X 
830 ? ttNl; "END": CLOSE ttNl 
840 XIO 33,ttNl.Ne,Ne,N0NTHFILES:M0NTHF 
ILES=M0NTHFILES (N3) 

850 GRAPHICS N8:G0SUB BRKDIS: POKE 559, 
N8:? :? :? "XIO 32,ttNl,N8.N8,";CHRS(34 
) ; TEWFILES ; " , " ; MONTHFILES 
868 ? :? :? "CONT": POSITION N8,N8:P0KE 

842,N13:ST0P 
878 POKE 842, N12 

880 IF A=ASC("N") THEN C0UNT=N8 :INDEX= 
Nl:SVE=N8: MONTHDATS::"": GOTO 296 
898 IF A=ASC("E") THEN 980 
988 LOCATE N7,R,Z:IF Z=ASC("M") THEN 9 
38 

918 NEN0S=M0NTHDATS (INDEXK63-21 , INDEX* 
63) 

920 POSITION N4,R:? " MEMO: ";»CMOS; 
" ":GOTO 590 

938 POSITION N7,R:? BS (N8) :CHECKS=MONT 
HDATS (INDEXKe3-e2 , INDEX«63) 
948 CHECKNUHS=CHECKS(N2.N5) :DATES=CHEC 
KS(N6,N13) : PAYEES=CHECKS(N14, 34) : AMOUN 
TS=CHECK$ (35, 41) : CS=CHECKS (Nl , Nl) 
958 FOR X=N1 TO N7:IF ANOUNTS (X,X) <>" 
" THEN NEXT X:GOTO 970 

968 TENPS=AM0UNTS : AMOUNTS (N9-X, N7) =TEN 
PS : ANOUNTS (Nl , N8-X) =BS (Nl , N8-X) 
970 POSITION N2,R:? CS;" "; CHECKNUMS;" 

S";ANOUNTS;" ";PAYEE$(N1,N15) ;" ";DAT 
ES(N1,N5); :GOTO 590 
980 GRAPHICS N17:G0SUB BRKDIS : POSITION 

N3,N9:? ttN6; "SCANNING NONTH": POSITION 

NlO.Nll:? ttN6; "tt" 
998 mNTHFILES="D: NONTH .DAT" 
1888 N0NTH=NB:AN0UNT=N8 
1618 COUNT=NO 

1628 IF NONTH<Nie THEN MONTHFILES (N8,N 
8) ="6" : MONTHFILES (N9 , N9) =STRS (MONTH) : G 
OTO 1048 

1638 MONTHFILES (NS,N9)=STRS (NONTH) 
1648 POSITION Nil, Nil:? ttN6;N0NTH 
1658 CLOSE ttN2:0PEN ttN2, N4,N8,N0NTHFIL 
ES 



PAGE 56 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



1860 IMPUT ttN2;CHECK$:IF CHECK5="EHD" 
THEN 1168 

1678 C0UNT=C0UNT+N1:IF CHECK$CN1,N1}=" 
»" THEN 1868 

1888 IF CHECKS CN2,N5)="DEP " THEN UCDE 
P=UCI>EP+H1 : UCDAMNT=UCDAMNT+VAL (CHECKS C 
35)1 :G8T8 1868 

1898 UNCAN=UNCAN+N1 : UCAHNT=UCAHNT+UAL C 
CHECKS C35} } :G8T0 1868 

1180 M0NTH=M0NTH+N1:IF MDNTH<N13 THEN 
1618 

1118 CL85E ttN2:8PEN ttN2,N4, N8,"D :BALAN 
CE. DAT": INPUT 1tN2; BALANCES : CLOSE ttN2 
r±12Q AHOUNT=EBALtUCDAMNT-UCANNT 
1138 TEI1PS=5TRS(UCAMNT) SGQSUB DOLFORHA 
T : UCAMNTS=TEMPS : TEMPS=STRS (UCDAHNT) : GO 
SUB DOLFORHAT:UCDAMNTS=TEMPS 
1140 TEI1PS=STRS(EBAL} :GOSUB DOLFORNAT: 
EBALS=TEMPS 

1150 GRAPHICS NOlGOSUB BRKDIS:POKE 752 
,Nl:POKE 710,N8:P0KE 789, N8 
1168 POSITION N2,N4:? "ENDING BALANCE 

":position 30, N4:? "S":pos 

ITION 38-LEN(EBALS),N4:? EBALS 
1170 TEMP$=STRS(UNCAN) 

1180 POSITION N2,N6:? "- OUTSTANDING C 
HECKS C" ' UNCAN ' "j " ' 

IISO for' X=24+LEN (SIRS (UNCAN)} TO 27:? 
"-";:NEHT XIPOSITION 38-LEN (UCAMNTS) , 
N6:? UCANNTS 
1200 POSITION N2,N8:? "SUBTOTAL 



1210 POSITION 31, N7:? "- 



-":TEMPS= 



STR$(EBAL-UCAMNT) :GOSUB DOLFORNAT :POSI 

TION 30, H8:? "S" 

1228 POSITION 38-LEN (TEMPS), H8:? TEMPS 

: TEMPSrSTRS (UCDEP) 

1230 POSITION N2,Nie:? "* OUTSTANDING 

DEP . ("'UCDEP'")"* 

1240 FOR X=22+LEM (SIRS (UCDEP)) TO 27:? 

"-";:NEHT K:POSITION 38-LEN (UCDAMNTS) 
,Nie:? UCDAMNTS 

1250 POSITION 31, Nil:? " ": TEMPS 

=STRS(EBAL-UCAMNT+UCDAMNT) :GOSUB DOLFO 

RMAT 

1260 POSITION 30,N12:? "S": POSITION 38 

-LEH (TEMPS), N12:? TEMPS 

1270 POSITION N2,N12:? "YOUR BALANCE S 

HOULD BE " 

1288 P8SITI0N N2,N14:? "YOUR BALANCE I 

5 ": POSITION 38-LEN (BALANCE 

S),N14:? BALANCES 

1298 POSITION 31,N15:? " 

1300 DIF=AMOUNT-VAL (BALANCES) 

1310 POSITION N2,Nie:? "DIFFERENCE 

., . TeMPS=STRS (DIF) : GOSl 

OLFORMAT 

1320 POSITION 30,N16:? "S": POSITION 38 

-LEN (TEMPS), N16:* TEMPS 

1330 IF DIF THEN 1458 

1348 POSITION N13,N2e:? "BDEZ3IXI3SB 
■":REST8RE 1398 

1358 READ A,B,C:IF A=-N1 THEN SOUND Nl 
,N8,NO,N0:S0UND N2, N8,N8,N8 :GOTO 1358 
1360 IF A=-N2 THEN FOR H=N1 TO 48: NEXT 

X:FOR X=N8 T8 N2:S0UND X,N8,N8,N8:NEX 
T X:GOTO 1470 

1378 SOUND N0,A,N10,N6:S0UND Nl,B,Nie, 
N6:S0UND N2,C,Nig,Ne 

1380 FOR K=N1 TO Nie:NEXT X:GOTO 1358 
1398 DATA 121,47,48,121,47,48,-1,-1,-1 
,162,47,48,162,47,48,121,53,45,121,68, 
47,-1,-1,-1 

1488 DATA 162,68,47,162,68,47,121,64,5 
8,121,68,47,-1,-1,-1,162,68,47,162,68, 

1418 DATA 121,68,47,121,64,58,162,68,4 
7,162,68,47,121,64,58,121,68,47,-1,-1, 

1428 DATA 162,68,47,162,68,47,121,64,5 

8,121,68,47,162,47,48,162,47,48 

1438 DATA 121,68,47,121,4^,46,162,53,4 

5,162,53,45,162,53,45,162,53,45 

1448 DATA 162,64,53,162,64,53,162,64,5 

3,162,64,53,-2,-2,-2 

1458 G8SUB SNDl :POSITION N17,N20:? "| 

EECEB" 



:GOSUB D 



1460 C=(N28-LEN(DIFS})/'N2 

1470 PeSITION H15,21:? tlN6;"T=TRY AGAI 

N" 

1480 POSITION N17,22:? nH6;"M=MENU" 

1490 CLOSE ttNl:OPEN ttNl,N4, NO,"K : " :GET 

ttNl,A:CLOSE ttNl 
1500 IF Ai:ASC("M") THEN 1530 
1510 IF A=ASC("T") THEN INDEX=N1 : UNCAN 
=N0 : UCAMNT=NO : UCDEP=NO : UCDAMNT=NO : STAR 
T=NO:GOTO 290 
1520 GOTO 1490 

1530 GRAPHICS N17:G0SUB BRKDIS:POSITIO 
N N3,N5:? ttN6;"please insert": POSITION 

N3,N7:? ttN6;"prDqraM disk" 

1540 POSITION N3,N16:? ttN6 : " [■TraMH.'L'a 
[a33":GOSUB 80: TRAP 1570: RUN "D:MENU" 
1550 CLOSE ttN2: GRAPHICS N 17:G0SUB BR KD 
IS: POSITION N4,N8:? ltN6ji"ti !itiMr<.-M;ril|i " ; 
POSITION N4,Nie:? ttN6 ; "Mhi c rochec V" 
1560 POSITION N5,N12:? »N6;"[3ai3EfBS 
":60SUB SNDl: FOR X=N1 TO 508: NEXT X:GO 
TO 260 
1570 GRAPHICS N 17:G0SUB BRK DIS:POSITIO 

N N4,N8:? itN6;"iEjHaaaEBaa": POSITION 

N7,H18:? tlN6;"aaMlIr 

1580 P8SITI0N N6,N12:? ttH6 }"3SiSaEB": 
GOSUB SNDl: FOR X=N1 TO 588: NEXT X:GOTO 
1538 



CHECKSUM DATA. 

(see page 24) 

16 DATA 822,488,132,379,8,58,596,236,7 

99,593,74,46,537,688,788,6868 

218 DATA 588,281,121,28,923,585,171,75 

2,45,214,642,380,89,110,884,5645 

358 DATA 591,239,812,827,48,633,122,53 

5,577,225,51, 242 , 472 , 232 , 528 , 6134 

588 DATA 334,598,684,220,369,254,157,7 

38,281,482,53,64,31,67,81,4317 

658 DATA 98,84,749,674,633,866,727,877 

,750,713,935,423,173,235,330,8259 

868 DATA 78,88,751,313,606,721,38,351, 

55,97,236,232,536,176,607,4885 

958 DATA 718,237,472,556,148,175,31,68 

9,824,396,36^,737,995,431,595,7282 

1188 DATA 443,252,623,209,844,185,913, 

188,218,572,891,224,211,825,884,7386 

1250 DATA 743,771,652,403,214,854,488, 

794,634,77,437,283,206,865,834,8895 

1480 DATA 29,985,196,283,221,376,125,2 

71,333,762,517,937,735,228,885,6795 

1550 DATA 883,419,587,164,1973 



ATTENTION 
USER GROUPS 

I'd like to extend my thanks to all of the Atari 
groups and their officers in response to our 
survey. 

If your group hasn't received a questionnaire, 
please contact me as soon as possible at: 

ANALOG Computing 

Attn: Lee Pappas 
P.O. Box 23 
Worcester, MA 01603 
(617) 892-9230 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 57 



A 

Word 
^Processings 

Triloefv 



by Bob Curtin 



I like to write, and it takes very little to move me 
to the keyboard. In the past, the procedure I had to 
use to write something was to rough-draft the docu- 
ment, blue-pencil the first draft, type the second draft 
and include any new paragraphs or phrases I'd written 
between the lines, in margins or on separate sheets 
of paper. 

If I'd been really on the ball, the second draft would 
need only a fraction of the editing the first one re- 
quired. I simply edited it, checked the grammar and 
spelling, then typed the final draft. Since I'm not ex- 
actly the quickest typist in North America, this proce- 
dure took a while. And, though I'm an accurate typist, 
the inevitable dabs of Liquid Paper appeared on each 
and every page. 

If I was then struck with another Lucid Thought 
which I wanted to include in the text, I had a choice: 
retype all of the pages from the Thought to the end 
of the piece; or just leave out the additions. I won't 
bother to describe the horror of finding a major error 
in the typing of the final draft, or the frustration of 
having to retype rejected manuscripts, or the tedium 
of typing additional copies of a manuscript. 

Well, word processing has changed all of that. My 
Atari simply outclassed my battered electric typewriter. 
With the addition of word processing software and 
an inexpensive printer (and there are a slew of them 
out there), I'm now able to spend my time creatively 
writing, instead of tediously typing. 



So what is word processing, anyway? 

All that word processing involves is a program to 
allow you to type documents, letters, forms, reports — 
or anything else your heart desires — onto your TV 
or monitor screen. This text can then be edited, al- 
tered, rearranged, merged with other documents, for- 
matted (a way of telling the printer how you want the 
thing to look), saved to a disk and, finally, dumped 
to a printer. 

The enormous advantage that word processing has 
over a typewriter is its ability to do all of the editing 
on the screen and get it right before you print it out. 
Whole blocks of text can be moved, deleted, added 
or stuffed into a completely different document. 

The features of word processing programs vary dras- 
tically, from super-complicated business-oriented and 
dedicated word processors to ultra-simple miniproces- 
sors which you can type in from various books and 
computer magazines. For selection, we Atari owners 
are fortunate, indeed, to have many programs of this 
type available to us. 

Choosing a word processing program is a highly sub- 
jective affair. There's no such thing as the "ideal" word 
processor, except where it relates to individual needs. 
By that, I mean that what's good for one person may 
be a white elephant to someone else. 

Generally, the more features, flexibility and power 
the word processor has, the more complex it'll be to 
use. If all you plan on doing is v/riting letters, school 



1 ! I 





r_2 



Atan 



^SdlS^^ 



The deMttw Jffif "* 




r"^™"| ABCs of Atari Computers 

'by David E. Mentley Sugg. Retail $14.95 

Full of useful information without being overly teclnnical, ABCs addresses 
a broad spectrum of Atari topics. Arranged in alpliabetical order, many defi- 
nitions are clarified with accompanying programs. Written in clear, concise 
terms, this book can be used by beginners and experts alike 



When you order a new subscription to 
ANALOG Computing, you'll receive your 
choice of ABCs of Atari Computers or 
Atari Roots FREE Our supply is limited, 
so send in your subscription card today! 




Yoirr choice o1^ 
Atari guides.. J 




Atari Roots 

by Mark Andrews Sugg. Retail $14.95 
The easiest guide ever to learning Atari assembly language. Using a 
"hands on" approach, you'll get started programming this fast, effi- 
cient language quickly This much needed book teaches assembly 
language using the Atari Assembler Editor and the popular MAC/65 
Assembler Programs will work on all Atari computers. 



Mail in the special subscription envelope inserted in this magazine, v\/ith your selection checked. 



CALL TOLL FREE 
(800) 345-8112 

in Pennsylvania 
(800) 662-2444 



P.O. BOX 615 ' HOLMES, PENNSYLVANIA 19043 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 59 



reports and general household correspondence, then 
one of the less complicated word processors would 
probably be best for you. If you're really into writing, 
then something more powerful would fit the bill. 

The following three reviews are not meant to be 
a comparison. Each word processor is aimed at a differ- 
ent type of user. Which one is "best" is a decision 
destined to be made by different people with differing 
needs. I can say emphatically that all three of these 
programs are excellent. They're all solid, quality pro- 
grams with superb documentation. Although each has 
deficiencies, nobody will be stuck with a lemon by 
buying one of these packages. 



In the lower right-hand corner of the screen is a graph- 
ic representation of what your document will look like 
on an 80 -column page. There's even a little blinking 
cursor to show you where you are on the page. I loved 
this feature. There was never any guesswork about how 
close you were to the end of the printed page. 

Each individual letter is represented by a graphics 
8 size pixel, and the display is updated every time you 
stop typing for about two seconds. 

The bottom left side of the screen contains a bar 
graph display, showing how much disk space and free 
memory is available for your use. There's also a nota- 
tion of what page is currently displayed. 



HOMEWORD 
SIERRA ON-LINE, INC. 
P.O. Box 485 
Coarsegold, CA 93614 
48K Disk $69.95 

Homeword takes an approach to word processing 
not unlike that used by some high-priced computers 
on the market. It's essentially a menu-driven program, 
but, in place of numbers or letters to identify the ele- 
ments in each menu, Homeword uses "icons" (illus- 
trations of the functions to be performed). 

The main menu contains— among others — pictures 
of a filing cabinet, a printer and a disk. By placing 
the cursor on one of these icons and pressing RE- 
TURN, the user is rewarded with another menu con- 
taining additional icons which graphically illustrate 
their function. 



A^ari HoneHord Hei^ 

Vour docuMent will be restored to the 
screen trtten ESC is pressed. {3 

use CTRL OCup) and CTRL pCdo%m) to page 
through the help docuHent.iS 

13 

The following are the control keys for 

HOMeHord broken down by type of 

function:i3 

Character Functions^ 



Free neH: 
Free disk:' 
Press ESC to go to the «enu. 



Homeword. 

One doesn't have to be Fellini to understand what 
an illustration of a filing cabinet with an arrow point- 
ing up out of an open drawer means. Not surprising- 
ly, the amount of time it takes to use this program 
effectively is a mere fractioi-i of what it would take 
if the menus contained letters or numbers. 

The working area of the screen is only fifteen lines 
long, but, because of another nice touch, it's plenty. 





^ 






The 

HQimwc 


HOMi:\yoRi) 


|0\ii VU^RJ) 
Hr).MEV\()R[) 


Story 




-.icii- ll'>V™™l» 1 ' . \ . 


■■■■■1 


w 


'.^.:i^Mm. 


BB^BwBira 








■ T 


■[■ 


1 . := ; 


. ■ " ■ ' 


1 ■ ■" 


; H' ■ ■ 







Homeword. 

Homeword has little more than the expected con- 
trols, though there are a couple of unique features 
in the program. The block operations include: erase, 
insert erased text, move and copy. The "find" and 
"find and replace" functions are limited to words or 
phrases up to thirty characters long, but there are no 
"wild card" characters available. 

File manipulation is quick and easy. The usual save, 
load and chain capabilities are available, as well as 
a couple of modifications. There's an "include docu- 
ment" function, which is simply the chain function 
with a little twist. 

With "include document," you can combine any 
named file on disk with the file in memory as it's be- 
ing printed. It can be put at the beginning, the end 
or anywhere in between, and the included document 
is not loaded into memory. It never shows up on the 
screen, nor is it displayed in the print preview. This 
feature is not just a convenience; it's an absolute ne- 
cessity. Which brings me to my only severe criticism 
of Homeword. 



PAGE 60 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



Apparently, the icon concept is a memory-expensive 
route to travel. I started writing this introduction and 
first review with Homeword but quickly discovered 
that, with my 48K Atari 800, 1 had only enough work- 
ing memory to type in less than three double-spaced 
pages of text. 

I don't know how much is gained on an 800XL, 
but I doubt it's enough to more than double the ca- 
pacity. And less than six double-spaced pages is just 
not enough for serious writing. Even in a strictly 
"home" environment, it's a deficiency I'd find pretty 
hard to live with, though the ease of use may offset 
this for some folks. Anyway, there are ways around 
the problem, even if they're inconvenient. 

The low memory capacity also makes the "insert 
document" function next to useless. This function 
is the same as "include document," except it merges 
the disk-based document with the one in memory. 
This function does load the inserted copy into mem- 
ory, thus using up valuable memory space. 

So much for the bad news. The good news: Home- 
word is an absolute joy to use. At any time, you can 
get an on-line, scrolling, 80-column display of what 
your document will look like when it's printed. No, 
the display is not a 40-column split-screen display 
of 80 columns, but an honest-to-goodness 80-column 
display. It's a nice feature, but with the little graphic 
display to show you the same thing, it's an unneces- 
sary one — certainly not worth the memory cost. 

Another interesting feature of Homeword is the "in- 
dented point" icon. With this, you can automatical- 
ly create outlines or lists. The program will number 
and letter each line, indenting the subitems to default 
values — or you may modify the format to suit your 
needs. 

The cursor controls are standard Atari fare, as are 
the delete functions. In fact, there are no "unnatur- 
al" controls to get used to. Learning to use the pack- 
age is easy and painless. There was obviously a lot 
of thought put into this aspect of the program. 

Although there is no printer driver software (other 
than for Atari-compatible printers), the "customize" 
menu allows you to take advantage of the special fea- 
tures of your Atari-compatible printer. 

All in all, I give this program very high marks in 
ease of use, speed and overall value. It's the perfect 
word processor for young children and for those among 
us who are a bit frightened by a computer. This pro- 
gram will certainly put you at ease. 

SUPER-TEXT 
MUSE SOFTWARE 
347 N. Charles Street 
Baltimore, MD 21201 
48K Disk $175.00 

Super-Text is touted on the package as a "profes- 
sional word processor." If they mean that it's on a par 
with Wordstar or Peachtext, then I'm afraid they're 



stretching the truth some, if for no other reason than 
that there are no 80-column screen boards supported 
here. If they mean that it has a good many of the fea- 
tures, plus the power and flexibility that the full-bore 
professional word processors have, then they hit the 
nail right on the head. 

Super-Text is packaged with two copy-protected 
disks, a quick reference card and a fat, spiral-bound 
reference manual. The manual is complete and set up 
so that you can easily find an answer to most any 
problem you might run into. The handy quick refer- 
ence card lists all of the commands (and there are 
many) in each of the modes (and there are many). 




Super-Text. 



The Super-Text reference manual gives clear, con- 
cise, step-by-step instructions on all aspects of the pro- 
gram. The last chapter of the manual is devoted to 
troubleshooting, so if you're having problems, you'll 
at least have a place to start. 

The program itself is not the type that you can just 
sit down and use to its fullest. It's a complex package 
with a respectable learning curve attached to it, es- 
pecially if you're short on experience with word pro- 
cessors. However, once the system is absorbed, and 
the power of the program manifests itself, I believe 
you'll find the effort well worth it. 

Super-Text has most of the features found in the 
"pro" word processors, including: file merge; word find 
(more about that in a minute); word occurrence count; 
word count in files (a handy item for those of you writ- 
ing for publication and have editors counting every 
word); the usual block operations, such as move, de- 
lete, copy and save as a new file; and an impressive 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 61 



array of formatting commands. There's no spelling cor- 
rection program (electronic dictionary) or mail merge 
capability, which you'd expect for the price, but per- 
haps it's coming up in the future. 

The word find capabilities are truly remarkable. Any 
word or phrase of up to thirty characters in length 
can be found and replaced, if desired, quickly and eas- 
ily. There are two special characters in this function 
which give you some latitude. 

The & character will match any number of spaces 
in your text (including no spaces at all). For example, 
if you tried to find any&one, you'd actually find any 
one, anyone or any one. The i character acts as a wild 
card. Any character can be matched to it. For in- 
stance, if you tried to find PUson, Super-Text would 
find Poison, Person, Parson, etc. 

Another nice feature is the multiple word find/word 
replace capability. Any number of words or phrases 
can be found at the same time, as long as the total 
characters don't exceed thirty. All that's necessary is 
to separate the words by commas. 

Formatting can be done line by line, if desired. That 
is, you can start off with margins, line spacing or any 
of a number of other parameters set one way, change 
them at any point in your work and change them 
again, etc. The formatting controls allow just about 
any format your printer will support. 

Moreover, if the ready-made printer drivers aren't 
up to the job, there is a module which allows you to 
modify the driver to use the control characters your 
printer accepts. Those of you with off-brand or weird 
printers can modify the program to recognize this and 
print documents using the special features of your 
printer, such as double-column printing, boldface, spe- 
cial fonts, etc. 

Super-Text doesn't stop there. Though the general 
editing controls are pretty much standard, they seem 
to provide those little extras which save enormous 
amounts of time and effort. As an example, the page 
numbering can be turned on or off, set to any desired 
number, set to chapter relative numbering (page 2 in 
chapter 5 would be numbered 2-5) and combined with 
text in the header or footer. The page numbering can 
also be formatted to be printed on alternating sides 
of the pages. 

I could go on and on about the control this pro- 
gram provides, but I think a couple of examples would 
serve to illustrate the fact in far less space. 

Super-Text's program provides a feature called "auto- 
link" which, when turned on, will link an unlimited 
number of files together on one or more disk drives. 
The functions supported with the autolink feature are: 
find, find and replace, print, and load the next linked 
file. Files can even be linked together into a loop and 
accessed forward or backward. An obvious use for this 
feature would be finding word or phrase occurrences 
in multiple files. 

(continued on next page) 



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CIRCLE ff\22 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



PAGE 62 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



Another neat feature is something which is a Ufe- 
saver for those of us with the less expensive printers. 
Pressing a couple of buttons will advance the paper 
forward exactly one page. I grant you that, by itself, 
this last feature isn't a reason to go buy Super-Text, 
but it does give you an idea of the attention to detail 
which was paid in developing the program. 

Gripes? Only one, and it's minor. The editing is 
done by switching modes. The "add" mode allows you 
to type in your document, but if, along the way, you 
make a mistake, you must switch modes to position 
the cursor over the mistake to make the change, then 
make the change, then switch back to "add" to con- 
tinue typing in text. It's awkward, but something that 
can be lived with as familiarity with the program de- 
velops speed. 

I'm impressed with Super-Text. It's a powerful, in- 
credibly versatile word processor with depth and so- 
phistication. It's not for the casual user, by any means, 
and the price will bear that out. But if you're a per- 
son who does a lot of serious writing, it's a package 
well worth looking into. 

THE WRITER'S TOOL 

OPTIMIZED SYSTEMS SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 710337 

San Jose, CA 95171 

48K Cartridge or Disk $129.95 

The Writer's Tool (TWT) is probably the best com- 
promise between total word control and ease of use 
that I've seen in a word processor. TWT is loaded 
with features; in fact, it has most of the features found 
in the "professional" word processors, plus a few tricks 
of its own. But it's an easy package to learn and even 
easier to use. 

TWT comes with a ROM cartridge, a disk contain- 
ing the printer drivers and customizing program, and 
the nicest manual I've ever seen. The manual is bound 
in a three-ring vinyl-covered notebook and covers ev- 
ery aspect of the program in infinite detail. There's 
both a table of contents and a thorough index, so find- 
ing the topic you're having trouble with is easy. The 
book is set up in two parts: a tutorial section and refer- 
ence section. Once you've gained some experience 
with the program, you need not wade through un- 
necessary text to find what you need. 

One of the things I liked most about The Writer's 
Tool is the integrated text entry and editing. There 
are no changing modes to move the cursor or make 
corrections. If you've been using an Atari for a while, 
the editing controls will feel completely natural, since 
they work in almost the same way as the editor in 
Atari BASIC. 

If you don't like the big, fat block of a cursor that 
Atari uses, then press SELECT. Presto! You now have 
a blinking underline for a cursor. Press it again, and 
the block comes back. 



The automatic word wrap can also be turned on 
and off, by pressing START. I know that doesn't sound 
like a useful feature at first, but it is. There are times 
when, because of the word wrap, you can't tell how 
many spaces you've left between words or between the 
period at the end of a sentence and the first letter 
of the next sentence (especially if you've been doing 
extensive editing). By turning off the word wrap, you 
can tell at a glance. With other 40-coIumn word pro- 
cessors, I had to physically back up the cursor and 
count the spaces. 

Speaking of modifying things you don't like, TWT 
provides a customizer program which allows you to 
change a wide variety of the default values in the pro- 
gram, such as the page length, line spacing, screen 
color and character luminance, cursor brightness, and 
cursor blink frequency. There's a lot more, but I won't 
bother to list them. These new parameter values can 
be saved in files to be called up later, or they can be 
made to boot up automatically with program initial- 
ization. 

As I said, TWT sports a list of very useful items, 
not the least of which are the soft hyphen and the 
group command. The latter is essentially a conditional 
page eject which gives the user the ability to prevent 
page breaks happening in awkward places (immedi- 
ately after a topic heading). 

The soft hyphen will, when right justification is 
in use, hyphenate long words only when needed to 
prevent those wide spaces that occur between words 
otherwise. Your text appears much more professional 
and is also more readable. The soft hyphen is condi- 
tional and will only be used by TWT when needed. 

TWT has a full range of printing formatting con- 
trols, accessed through either an internal or external 
formatting line. The external line reverts to default 
values after printing, whereas the internal line remains 
a part of the file and overrides all relevant values ev- 
ery time it's printed. 

The imbedded format line can be inserted anywhere 
in the text to change line spacing, margins, printer 
fonts, tab values, page ejects, justification, centering, 
and any of a host of other controls. There isn't much 
you can't do with the formatting controls available 
here. With practice and imagination, you should have 
remarkable control over the printing process. 

TWT also allows full linking capabilities, as well 
as a merge system which you can use in conjunction 
with a template. A template is simply a document 
containing space for variables. 

For instance, suppose you wanted to send a form 
letter to two hundred people, and wanted their names 
and addresses in the heading, with their names in the 
salutation. The template would be the letter itself, 
with the headings and salutations as the variables. 

You could create a database with the names and 

(continued on page 64) 



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CIRCLE #123 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



PAGE 64 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



(continued from page 62) 

addresses, then merge the data with the template dur- 
ing printing. Each letter would contain the name of 
a new addressee in the salutation and that name and 
address in the heading. Now you, too, can send junk 
mail! 

The block operations consist of the usual mark, 
copy and delete. To move text from one place to an- 
other, you must mark it and copy the text to the new 
location. Then you'd go back and delete the text origi- 
nally marked. It's a little awkward if you're used to 
simply moving copy from one place to another, but 
it's not a serious handicap. 

OSS has included drivers for sixteen different print- 
ers, including Epson, Okidata, Gemini, NEC, C.Itoh, 
Atari, Centronics and Brother. There's also a "gener- 
ic" driver for use with any printer. 

Is there anything I don't like about The Writer's 
Tool/ Actually, no. Is there anything 1 can criticize? 
Not much, except for the fact that there's no printer 
driver that can be modified to take care of that weird 
printer you may have. 

Other than that. The Writer's Tool is an excellent 
program. It's as useful to the casual writer as to the 
constant user and, although it's not a truly professional 
level word processor, it will certainly be adequate for 
anything but professional writing. D 



POPCORN 
UPDATE 

Several readers have written about a problem 
with Popcorn, printed in ANALOG Comput- 
ing's issue 26. As listed, the program cannot be 
restarted after the first play. 

The short section of DATA statements below 
replace Lines 1740-1780 of the original BASIC 
program and fix the restart program. After plac- 
ing these lines in the BASIC program, simply 
RUN the program to create the boot tape or AU- 
TORUN disk. 



1740 DATA 85a6A5A518e58e85A59ee2E6A618 

A5A5e90e85A5A9ie65A6S5A6A9e08595A5878A 

0A26890A268918658785A7A5,333 

1750 DATA 8?e5A885A8A4AeBlA7A00051A5A5 

A518e92885A59088E6A6A5AeC92OBeO8E6AOA5 

AeC9e9D0DFC68A30834CD02C,342 

1760 DATA e0A59C38E9244A4A3SE9e48591A0 

0eA2eeBD0086F004C551F0ieE8E8E00CDeFlE6 

91C8A208C0e6D0E860E8BDe0, 283 

1770 DATA 86CAC94E90E7859EBDe0868586A9 

eF8587A900?De0ee9D0ie64CC82CA8e0989180 

C8D0FBEe81CAD0F6e02070Fe, 825 

1780 DATA F2F2FE7E3E0F0F0F8F0F0F0FFFFF 

FF7E7E7E7E7E7E7EO8OO8O0OOOO878F8808OOO 

8eoeeeeeoeeeeeeeeeeoeoee,i27 



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Need something interesting to do witti that left over 

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CIRCLE #126 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 65 



SMOOTHWRITER WORD PROCESSING SYSTEM 

DIGITAL DELI 

4470 SW Hall, Suite 291 

Beaverton, OR 97005 

48K Disk $79.95 



by Keith Valenza 

If you've been shopping around for a sophisticated 
word processing system for your Atari, you might want 
to take a look at Smoothwriter from Digital Deli. It's 
one of the most advanced microcomputer word 
processors I've ever seen. 

Designed for use with an Epson or NEC printer, 
Smoothwriter has several features not normally as- 
sociated with word processors. For example, have you 
ever heard of a word processor that can use a track- 
ball or a joystick to move the cursor in lightning 
speed? Smoothwriter can. Of course, you can always 
move the cursor using the keyboard if you prefer, but 
the game controllers move it much faster. They're also 
more fun to use, if word processing could ever be called 
"fun." 

You can also make backup copies of the Smooth- 
writer program disk, a feature which can prevent a 
lot of headaches. Apparently, Smoothwriter's author 
does not feel threatened by potential piracy. 

Text editing, formatting and printing are usually 
functions of one program in many microcomputer 
word processors. Not so with Smoothwriter. This sys- 
tem uses separate programs for each function. The 
author maintains that having separate programs "op- 
timizes" each function, without "taxing the comput- 
er's resources." In this way, Smoothwriter is able to 
have nearly as many features as the more sophisticated 
professional word processors. 

Quickedit is the text editing program, which fea- 
tures windows in three separate colors. The text edi- 
tor is located at the top of the screen. This is the 
largest of the three windows, and the entering and 
editing of text takes place here. In the center, the mes- 
sage window tells you if an error has been made or 
if a command has been executed. At the bottom of 
the screen is the command window. 

The difference in each window's color allows the 
user to distinguish between the "active" and "inac- 
tive" windows. The blue-colored window is the active 
one, and it receives text or commands. The green win- 
dow is inactive. By pressing SELECT, the windows 
can be switched back and forth as needed. 

My only criticism of the Quickedit program is that 
it makes a distinction between the "physical" and the 
"logical" lines. The physical line is composed of the 
forty characters that appear from left to right on the 
screen. The logical line includes all of the text that 
appears on one line of a printed page. Because many 
of Quickedit's commands use logical line concept, un- 



derstanding this is a must for the user. However, I 
found the concept very confusing, and would never 
have missed it if it had been left out. 

Smoothwriter contains the most complete text- 
formatting program I've ever seen. This program. In- 
teractive Runoff, includes such features as paragraph 
and page formatting, headers and trailers, plus print 
characteristics like italics, doublestriking, underlining 
and various type sizes. Especially useful are the widow 
and orphan commands. When these commands are 
used, you can prevent having the first line of a para- 
graph appear at the bottom of a page, or the last line 
of a paragraph at the begirming of a page — before it's 
ever printed. 




Smoothwriter. 

Runoff Review, another program in Smoothwriter, 
will review any portion of the document on-screen, 
or print specified pages from the document. 

I was very impressed with Smoothwriter's documen- 
tation. It should be a model for all computer software. 
Although extremely detailed, it is very well organized 
and well written, section by section. Numerous tutori- 
als, examples, reference manuals (in addition to the 
instructions), and reference cards covering each of the 
hundreds of commands in the program — all make this 
documentation a user's dream. 

Beginners take note: don't expect to learn instant 
word processing in just a few short hours. Learning 
to use Smoothwriter is simple, however, if you are 
patient and willing to take the time to study the manu- 
al page by page. 

If you own an Epson or NEC printer, Smoothwriter 
should be a part of your software collection. It is both 
comprehensive and well documented. I only hope that 
Smoothwriter's author will write similar programs for 
the many Atari users who own other types of printers. 
Smoothwriter is too well written to benefit only one 
group of people. D 



PAGE 66 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



CITYWRITER WORD PROCESSOR 
by Michael T. Wallmeyer 
SOFTWARE CITY 
1415 Queen Ann Road 
Teaneck, NJ 07666 
(201) 575-4574 
48K Disk $39.95 



by Arthur Leyenberger 

When I first purchased my Atari computer system 
almost three years ago, my primary appHcation was 
word processing. At the time, three word processing 
programs were available: the Atari Word Processor, 
Datasoft's Text Wizard and LJK's Letter Perfect. I 
evaluated each of these products, using ease of use 
and features as criteria. 

I chose Letter Perfect, because it was powerful and 
had an adaptable printer driver that would utilize the 
features of my C.Itoh printer. Although initially I had 
to fight my way through the awful manual, 1 was fi- 
nally able to understand it, and have been using the 
program heavily ever since. 

One feature I've always wanted in a word processor 
was the ability to assign my own commands to any 
key. For example, if 1 thought it made sense that 
CTRL-B should represent "go to the bottom of the 
text file," 1 should be able to assign that meaning to 
those keys once and never have to worry about it 
again. Likewise, if using CTRL-E for "go to the end 
of text" made sense, then I should be able to use that 
set of keystrokes. 

So far, 1 haven't found a word processor for Atari 
that has offered this significant, useful feature. The 
CityWriter from Software City does include user- 
definable printer control codes and, therefore, comes 
as close as 1 have seen to my ideal in this respect. 

To use this feature of CityWriter, you must define 
a set of control characters which identify the appropri- 
ate printer commands. These control codes are stored 
in a separate file, which is read once by CityWriter 
in the print mode. The file consists of three pieces 
of information for each code: the control character 
(in inverse video) that you want to use, the number 
of ASCII characters that define the function, and the 
actual ASCII printer codes that should be transmitted 
to the printer. 

For example, if you want italics on an Epson FX-80 
printer, you would type in 1,2, 27,52 and J, 2, 27,5 3. 
CTRL-I and CTRL-J would turn italic print on and 
off, respectively. Unfortunately, there is no method 
of allowing just one control code to toggle the print 
function on and off. 

CityWriter separates the screen into two areas. The 
majority of the screen is used as a text window, which 
allows text input, editing and scrolling. At the bot- 
tom of the screen is a three-line command window. 



All of the information and commands that you need 
to operate the program (such as prompts, system func- 
tions and status) are contained here. 

There are four basic operational modes that all text 
processing functions are implemented with. The OP- 
TION key is used to select the desired mode, and the 
SELECT key is used to select sub-functions within 
a mode. Once a function has been selected, pressing 
START activates it. 

The ENTER function is used to input text. If text 
is already in memory, the new text will be appended 
to it. In this mode, the CLEAR, INSERT DELETE 
and cursor control keys are disabled. If a mistake is 
made while typing, the BACKSPACE key can be 
used. 



Tfcis is 9 test Of the Citytiriter 
word processor fron software City.EI 

This upper window is the text 
window, and is used to enter all 
text.B 

The lower window is the connand 
window, and is used to display 
operational infornation.ii 



IliTER'iElii FILE PRIMT C. .....•> 99 

M'ltm SCROLL &ELCTE MOUE FIMO CHAMGE 



CityWriter. 

EDIT allows you to perform a variety of functions 
on your existing text by choosing one of several sub- 
fimctions. Scroll permits you to move throughout your 
text with the cursor control keys. You can also jump 
to the top or bottom of your file, or scroll up or down 
one screen. Delete lets you delete a block of text af- 
ter first responding to the delete from and delete to 
prompts. Once text has been deleted, there is no way 
to get it back. 

EDIT Move allows you to copy — or move — a block 
of text anywhere in your document. Again, you are 
prompted to enter the move start and move end loca- 
tions, after which you are asked if you want to move 
or copy the block of text. Only about seventeen lines 
may be moved or copied at a time. 

EDIT Find is essentially a search command, and 
EDIT Change is a basically a search and replace com- 
mand. When using the edit change function, you can 
change either all or individual occurrences of the spec- 
ified string. 

The major drawback to the editing capabilities of 
CityWriter is that there is no "insert" mode. This 
means that, to insert additional text into your file, 
you must first append it to the end of the document, 
then use the edit move function to place the text 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 67 



where you want it. The manual states that this is a 
". . . relatively quick and painless process," but it would 
have been more convenient to be able to go to the 
place you want to insert your new text, enter an "in- 
sert" mode, and simply begin typing. 

CityWriter's third operational mode is the FILE 
function. Here, you can load and save files, display 
a directory of your disk, and erase or rename disk files. 
One particularly useable feature: when you select the 
FILE Load function with existing text in memory, you 
can choose either to append the file to the current 
text or replace the current text. 

The other function of the file mode is to format 
an entire disk. CityWriter wisely asks twice if you 
want to perform this function, since all files will be 
destroyed when the disk is formatted. 

PRINT is the fourth operational mode, which al- 
lows various print options to be selected by answering 
prompts. Text can be printed either with or without 
page numbers (including a specified starting page num- 
ber, if desired), and the page numbers may appear 
either on the top right or bottom center of the page. 
You can also choose to have the right margin justi- 
fied or unjustified (ragged edge). 

Additional prompts ask for: left margin and page 
width, lines per page, single or double spacing, and 
whether you want the output to go to the printer or 
a disk file. 

The 3 8 -page manual that accompanies CityWriter 
is brief but clear. There is no index, but that's not 
a problem, since the manual is arranged by functions. 
The program itself was originally written in Atari BA- 
SIC, then compiled using the ABC Compiler (Mon- 
arch Data Systems). This results in reasonably fast 
movement when scrolling. 

The files that- CityWriter creates are Atari DOS 
compatible, which means that spelling checking pro- 
grams (such as Spell Wizard and APX's Atspeller) 
should be useable. 

Atspeller worked without a hitch with the City- 
Writer files. Fiowever, Spell Wizard was able to read 
the files, but could not display them properly. Dur- 
ing correction, what appeared to be random charac- 
ters were displayed on the screen. Amazingly, when 
Spell Wizard saved the file back onto disk, CityWriter 
was able to read it. I still haven't figured out what 
is going on here. 

So what do you get for $39.95, compared to other 
inexpensive word processors like Bank Street Writer 
or Cut&Paste? You get a useable, "no-frills" word pro- 
cessor that will probably meet most of the needs of 
the typical Atari user. 

One of the strengths of CityWriter is that, by us- 
ing the command window to separate the commands 
from your text, you always know what mode you're 
in and which commands are available. This ensures 
that you are in control of the program at all times. 

Another strength is the error trapping, which— as 



an example — won't let you accidentally format a disk 
if you really don't want to. Finally, user-definable print- 
er codes let you customize your printing commands. 

On the negative side is the lack of an insert func- 
tion, which results in an awkward technique for in- 
serting text. Also, there is no provision for headers, 
footers, print previewing or automatically chaining 
files. 

All in all, CityWriter is worth considering if you're 
looking for an inexpensive, general purpose word pro- 
cessor. But be sure to test drive it first, to determine 
that it meets your needs. D 



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■ ^IH ^HB 



PAGE 68 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 




Boot 



Gamp 




by Tom Hudson 



All right, Boot Camp trainees, here we are again 
in the wonderful world of assembly language program- 
ming. This issue, we continue our work with BASIC 
USR calls, the mechanism which allows us to use as- 
sembly language routines in conjunction with BASIC. 

DPOKE solution. 

Last issue, we wrote a routine that allowed us to 
examine the contents of 2 -byte data items in memory, 
and called it DPEEK (double PEEK). Your homework 
was to write a companion routine, DPOKE, which 
will POKE a 2 -byte value into memory. We will write 
the USR call so that it can be called with the BA- 
SIC statement: 

n-U^H tI>POKE , ftDDHESS , UftLUEi 

The DPOKE routine can be written very easily. In 
fact, the DPEEK routine from last issue can be used 
as a starting point. Figure 1 shows the assembly lan- 
guage source code for the DPOKE routine. 



OlOa POKtL 


- 


$L'B 




ttllO POKEH 


— 


$CC 




0120 


*T 


$ObOO 




OliO 


CLD 




jCLEntt DECIMAL 


0140 


PLfl 




;D15CfiRD ttftHGS 


0150 


PLfl 




;PULL POKE HI 


0160 


Ijlfl 


POKEH 


;AHD 5flVE IT 


Oli'O 


PLfl 




JPULL POKE LO 


0180 


SIA 


POKEL 


JftHD SAVE ir 


0190 


LDY 


ttl 


;PoiNr Y ro HI 


0200 


PLfl 




;PULL UftLUE HI 


0210 


liirt 


tPOKELJ 


,Y ;POKE HI UflL 


0220 


DEY 




;poiNr Y ro LO 


0230 


PLfl 




;PULL VALUE LO 


0240 


5rfl 


tPOKEL) 


,V JPOKE LO UAL 


0250 


RT5 




;ALL DONE! 



Figure 1. 



Let's look at this code and see what makes it tick. 
For purposes of demonstration, we'll assume that we're 
DPOKEing the value 16479 ($405F) into location 560 
($0230). 

Line 130 clears the decimal mode, placing us 
in binary math mode. This program doesn't do 
any add or subtract operations, but let's do this 
anyway, just to get into the habit. 

Line 140pulls the number of arguments off the 
stack. We will assume that the programmer has 
sent two arguments, and discard this value. 

Line 150 pulls the high byte of the DPOKE 
address off the stack, placing it in the accumu- 
lator. At this point, the accumulator contains 
$02, the high-order portion of $0230. 

Line 160 stores the high byte of the address 
in the location POKEH, at address $00CC. We 
use a page address for this value, since we'll 
want to use the address as an indirect pointer. 

Line 170 pulls the low byte of the DPOKE ad- 
dress off the stack, leaving it in the accumula- 
tor. The accumulator now contains the low-order 
portion of $0230, or $30. 

Line 180 stores the low byte of the DPOKE 
address in the location labeled POKEL, which, 
like POKEH, is located on page 0. At this point, 
the 2 bytes POKEL and POKEH make up a 2- 
byte pointer for the specific location in memory 
corresponding to the first argument sent by BA- 
SIC. Using the address in our demonstration, 
POKEL contains $30, and POKEH contains $02, 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 69 



making a Z-byte pointer which points to $0230. 
We're now ready to perform the DPOKE opera- 
tion using the next two values on the stack. 

Line 190 places a J in the Y register, readying 
it for the storage of the high byte of the DPOKE 
value. 

Line 200 pulls the high byte of the value to 
be DPOKEd off the stack and places it in the 
accumulator. Once again, using our demonstra- 
tion values, you can see that the accumulator 
will, at this point, contain $40, the high byte 
portion of $405F. 

Line 210 stores the high byte of the value we 
want to DPOKE. As you see, the program uses 
the post-indexed indirect form of addressing to per- 
form this function. POKEH and POKEL contain 
the values $02 and $30, and form a pointer to 
location $0230. The accumulator at this point 
contains $40, and the Y register contains the 
number I . When we execute the instruction STA 
(POKEL),Y the computer will store the accumu- 
lator at location $0231, the address which is the 
sum of the pointer at POKEL ($0230) and the 
Y register ($01). 

Line 220 decrements the Y register by 1, mak- 
ing it 0. This will enable the low byte of the 
2 -byte DPOKE value to be stored in Line 240. 

Line 230 pulls the low byte of the value to 
be DPOKEd from the stack, leaving it in the ac- 
cumulator. At this point, using our example data, 
the accumulator would contain $5F, the low byte 
of the value to be POKEd, $405E 

Line 240 stores the low byte of the DPOKE 
data in the low-order byte of the DPOKE address. 
The address used to store the accumulator is cal- 
culated as in Line 210. Using our example values, 
the address contained in POKEL and POKEH 
($0230) plus the value in the Y register (0), gives 
a storage location of $0230. After this instruc- 
tion has been executed, both bytes of the 2 -byte 
DPOKE value have been properly stored, and 
we're finished. 

Line 250 executes an RTS instruction, which 
returns program control to BASIC. 

10 FOH M=1536 TO 1S53:READ N:POKE K,N: 

NEKT X:l>P0KErl!536 

20 FRAP 20:? "ENTER ADDRESS TO DPOKE"; 

■.INPUT ADDRESS 

SO TRAP 30:? "ENTER DATA TO DPOKE"; :IN 

PUT DATA: TRAP 40000 

40 A=USR (DPOKE, ADDRESS, DATA} 

50 GOTO 20 

100 DATA 216,104,104,133,204,104,133,2 

03,160,1,104,145,203,136,104,145,203,9 

6 

Figure 2. 

The BASIC program in Figure 2 allows you to test 
the DPOKE subroutine yourself. After typing in the 
program, type the following line and press RETURN. 



? PEEKC560J*PEEK(561)«256 

The number that BASIC prints is the address of 
the Atari computer's display list. This is a set of special- 
ized instructions used to generate the computer's dis- 
play. Add 1 to this number and write down the new 
value. Now RUN the BASIC DPOKE program. The 
computer will ask: 

ENTER ADDRESS TO DPOKE? 

Type 560 and press RETURN. Memory locations 560 
and 561 are a 2 -byte pointer which tells the computer 
where the display list is in memory. We will change 
this pointer, using the DPOKE function. 

After you enter the DPOKE address, the computer 
will ask: 

ENTER DATA TO DPOKE? 

Now type the number you wrote down earlier (the 
display list address + 1) and press RETURN. You 
should see your computer's display move up by one 
line. 

What happened? Because we changed the display 
list pointer so that it points 1 byte higher than it ori- 
ginally did, the display processor starts eight scan lines 
farther into the display, and the display is shifted up. 
If you change the pointer back to its original value, 
the display returns to normal. This is just one exam- 
ple of how the DPOKE subroutine can help. You can 
write a program with two display lists in memory, then 
switch between them with one simple USR call. 

The DPOKE subroutine can be a very handy addi- 
tion to your utility subroutine library — and add con- 
venience to programs which must alter the system 
pointers repeatedly. 

One word of caution, though. Be sure you know 
what locations you're changing! The DPOKE subrou- 
tine will allow you to change any 2 -byte memory 
group without restrictions, and careless use of this 
freedom could destroy vital system data or your pro- 
gram. . .or it could crash the system. 

You'll flip. 

Our next USR call example will give us some more 
experience with the post-indexed indirect addressing 
mode, this time in conjunction with BASIC strings. 

Many times, you'll want to manipulate the data in 
a BASIC string, or use the string as a method of stor- 
ing miscellaneous data. When you do this, you must 
tell the USR subroutine where the string is and how 
long it is. This is actually quite simple. 

This subroutine accepts two parameters, a string's 
address and its length. It then flips the state of the 
128 bit of each character in the string. Now, the 128 
bit of a character byte has a special significance to 
the Atari display processor: this is the bit which tells 
whether or not a character is to be displayed in in- 
verse video. 

If the 128 bit is off (0), the character is displayed 
normally, white character on blue background. If the 
bit is on (1), the character will be displayed in inverse. 



PAGE 70 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



a blue character on a white background. 

How will we manage to flip the 128 bit? Remember 
the exclusive-or function? We discussed it in issue 18. 
Briefly, the exclusive-or operation will flip the state 
of any bit in the accumulator if the corresponding bit 
in the operand byte is on. We'll use this principle to 
flip the high-order bit of each byte of the string. 

The USR statement that will be used to call this 
subroutine is of the form: 

A=U5R (FLIP , ADR (A$} , LEN (A$} 3 

Now let's look at the assembly code needed to per- 
form this function. Figure 3 shows one possible so- 
lution. 



oiee 


5TRADL 


= SCB 




Olio 


STRADH 


= 5CC 




0120 


5r«LEL 


- 5CD 




0130 


STRLEH 


= 5CE 




0140 




*- S0600 




0150 




CLD 






0160 




PLA 




{DISCARD tt ARGS 


0170 




PLA 




;PULL ADDR HI 


0180 




STA 


STRADH 


;AHD SAVE IT 


0190 




PLA 




iPULL ADDR LO 


0200 




STA 


STRADL 


;AND SAVE IT 


0210 




PLA 




IPULL LENGTH HI 


0220 




5TA 


STRLEH 


;AND SAVE IT 


0230 




PLA 




IPULL LENGTH LO 


0240 




5TA 


STRLEL 


;AND SAVE IT 


0250 


INVLP 


LDA 


STRLEL 


IGET LENGTH LO 


0260 




ORA 


STRLEH 


;HIX M/HI BYTE 


0270 




BNE 


FLIPIT 


IIT'S NON-ZERO! 


0280 




RT5 




;ALL DONE! 


0290 


FLIPIT 


LDA 


STRLEL 


; DECREMENT THE 


0300 




SEC 




LENGTH COUNTER 


0310 




SBC 


ttl 


BY 1 


0328 




STA 


STRLEL , 


AND PUT IT 


0330 




LDA 


STRLEH , 


BACK! 


0340 




SBC 


tto 




0350 




STA 


STRLEH 




0360 




LDY 


cstradl: 


READY Y REG. 


0370 




LDA 


,Y ;GET byte 


0380 




EOR 


«S80 


FLIP HI BIT 


0390 




STA 


(STRADL] 


,Y ;PUT BACK! 


0400 




LDA 


STRADL , 


NOM ADD 1. . . 


0410 




CLC 


, 


TO STRING. . . 


0420 




ADC 


«1 


ADDRESS. . . 


0430 




STA 


STRADL , 


POINTER 


0440 




LDA 


STRADH 




0450 




ADC 


no 




0460 




STA 


STRADH 




0470 




JMP 


IHVLP , 


AND LOOP BACK! 



Figure 3. 

Lines 100-110 reserve 2 bytes to store the ad- 
dress of the string that the subroutine will alter. 
Once again, since these bytes will be used as an 
indirect pointer in the post-indexed indirect in- 
struction format, they must be stored on page 0. 

Lines 120-130 reserve 2 more bytes to hold 
the string length value. This area will be used 
as a counter to determine when the flip process 
is complete. 

Line 150 clears the decimal mode. This pro- 
gram uses the arithmetic instructions ADC and 
SBC, and works with binary math. Therefore, 
we must be sure that the 6502 processor is ready 
to work with binary values. 



Line 160 pulls the number of arguments from 
the stack. We'll assume the programmer has sent 
the proper number of arguments, and discard this 
value. 

Lines 170-200 pull the 2 bytes that make up 
the string's address from the stack and store them 
in the string address hold area (STRADL and 
STRADH) on page 0. Remember, it's necessary 
for this value to be located on page 0, because 
we're going to use it as an indirect pointer to the 
string. All indirect pointers used in pre- and post- 
indexed operations must be stored on page 0. 
This is a limitation of the 6502 processor. 

Lines 210-240 pull the 2 bytes which make 
up the string's length from the stack and place 
them in the string length hold area (STRLEL 
and STRLEH). At this point, we're ready to be- 
gin processing the string and flipping bits. 

Lines 250-260 first load the accumulator with 
the value in STRLEL (the low byte of the string 
length), then OR this value with the number in 
STRLEH (the string length high byte). By using 
the ORA instruction, we combine the bits in 
STRLEL with those in STRLEH, allowing us to 
check very quickly to see if they are both 0. If 
either STRLEL or STRLEH have bits on, they 
will show up in the accumulator, and we'll know 
there are more characters left to process in the 
string. On the other hand, if the string length 
has reached 0, both STRLEL and STRLEH will 
be 0, and the ORA operation will result in a 
value in the accumulator. 

Line 270 tests the result of the previous ORA 
instruction. If there are more characters to pro- 
cess in the string, the accumulator will not be 
0, and the computer will BNE (branch if not 
equal/zero) to the location labeled FLIPIT, to 
process the next character. If the accumulator is 
0, all the characters have been processed, and 
the program continues at the next instruction. 

Line 280 is executed after all the characters 
have been processed. This is simply an RTS in- 
struction, and the computer resumes processing 
in BASIC. 

Lines 290-350, labeled FLIPIT begin the ac- 
tual bit-flipping operation. These lines subtract 
1 from the string length counter, STRLEL and 
STRLEH. As each character in the string is pro- 
cessed, this counter is decremented by 1. When 
this counter reaches 0, the ORA instruction at 
INVLP detects the condition and terminates the 
subroutine. 

Line 360 places a in the Y register, getting 
it ready for the post-indexed indirect operation 
that we'll use to flip the string's bits. By placing 
a in the Y register, the indirect operation will 
have a offset from the address in the pointer, 
STRADL and STRADH. 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 71 



Line 370 loads the accumulator from the ad- 
dress contained in the pointer STRADL and 
STRADH, which contains one of the characters 
in the string. As mentioned above, the Y register 
is set to 0, so that the byte is loaded from the 
address in the pointer, with no offset added by 
the Y register. For example, if STRADL/H is 
pointing to $457F, the accumulator will be loaded 
from address $457F ($457F + 0). 

Line 380 exclusive-ORs the accumulator with 
the value $80 (128 decimal, 10000000 binary). 
As you can see from the binary representation, 
this will flip the highest bit of the value in the 
accumulator. If the bit was on before the opera- 
tion, it will be turned off, and vice- versa. Since 
the value in the accumulator is one of the charac- 
ters in the string, this will change normal charac- 
ters to inverse, and inverse characters to normal. 

Line 390 uses the post-indexed indirect ad- 
dressing mode to store the character in the ac- 
cumulator back into memory, after the flip opera- 
tion is complete. One thing to note here is that 
you must pay close attention to what happens 
to the registers when programming in 6502 as- 
sembly language. For example, this STA instruc- 
tion uses the Y register as an offset, and you 



should be sure that it's not altered between the 
time you load the character value and store it. 
In this case, there's nothing to worry about, but 
in larger programs, you could run into trouble 
if many registers are being used, and the Y regis- 
ter had been changed. 

Lines 400-460 add 1 to the string address 
pointer, STRADL and STRADH. This advances 
the pointer to the next character in the string. 

Line 470 executes a JMP instruction, looping 
the program back to the label INVLP, where it 
will test for more characters to process. 

The BASIC program for the character flip program 
is shown in Figure 4. Type in the program and RUN 
it. 

10 FOR X=1536 TO 1533:READ HrPOKE K,N: 

NEXT K:FLIP=1536 

20 DIM A5C20} :flS="THI5 15 A TE5T" 

30 A=U5R(FLIP,ADRCA$),LEN(A$)} 

40 PRINT AS: GOTO 30 

100 DATA 216,104,104,133,204,104,133,2 

03,104,133,206,104,133,205,165,205,5,2 

06,208,1,96,165,205,56,233 

110 DATA 1,133,205,165,206,233,0,133,2 

06,160,0,177,203,73,128,145,203,165,20 

3,24,105,1,133,203,165 

120 DATA 204,105,0,133,204,76,14,6 

Figure 4. 



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PAGE 72 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



As you can see, each time the program executes 
Line 30, the string A$ is changed from normal video 
to inverse and vice-versa. The program changes all 
the characters, because we told it to start at the ad- 
dress of A$, and to flip as many characters as A$ 
contains. 

Let's try something a little different. Change Line 
30 to look like this and RUN the program again: 

38 A=U5RCFLIP,ADRtA$Cll)),4} 

Now you'll see an interesting variation on the orig- 
inal function. As you'll note when the program runs, 
only the word TEST is changing! We told it to change 
the eleventh character of A$ (ADR(A$(11))), and we 
told it to flip four characters. You can flip any portion 
of a string you like, and any number of characters. 

Here's another example of what this program can 
do. Change Lines 30 and 40 to read: 

38 A=USR CFLIP,PEEK (88) +PEEK C89}«256, 48) 
48 FOR MAIT=1 TO 58:NEKT HAITsGOTO 38 

After you've made the changes, RUN the program. 
You'll see the top line on the graphics screen flash. 
How is this being done? Locations 88 and 89 are a 
2 -byte pointer to the start of screen memory. By send- 
ing their address to the subroutine instead of a string 
address, along with a length of 40 bytes, the subrou- 



tine will flip the actual screen memory's inverse bits, 
and we have a flashing display line! 

Stay tuned. 

As you've seen from the examples I've used so far, 
you can perform a large variety of useful functions, 
very quickly, with USR subroutines. Next issue, we'll 
wrap up our USR call series so that we can proceed 
to bigger and better things. We'll still cover USR calls 
from time to time, but I'm sure there are a lot more 
areas that you'll enjoy exploring. 

Until then, play around with the 6502 and try writ- 
ing your own USR calls. And, should you find your- 
self stuck, remember that you can get in touch with 
me on CompuServe via the Atari SIG (my user ID 
is 70775,424), or by writing. D 



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ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 73 



^<j<>- 




TWO 
GUN 



16K Cassette or 24K Disk 



by Conrad Tatge 



All right, you potential Matt Dillons, here's your 
chance to walk down the main street of town . . . into 
the legends. 

TwoGun is a two-player machine language game. 
It demonstrates two assembly techniques essential on 
the Atari home computer: color changing and colli- 
sion detection. VCOUNT ($D40B) is monitored for 
the majority of the time, to change the color of the 
players partway down the screen, much like a display 
list interrupt. Also, the complexity of collision detec- 
tion becomes apparent, as most of the vertical blank 
is devoted to this. 

Typing it in. 

Before typing anything, look at the listings accom- 
panying this article. 

Listing 1 is the BASIC data and data check- 
ing routine. This listing is used to create both 
cassette and disk versions of TwoGun. The data 
statements are listed in hexadecimal (base 16), 
so the program will fit in 16K cassette systems. 



Listing 2 is the assembly language source code 
for the game of TwoGun, created with the Atari 
Macro assembler. You don't have to type this list- 
ing to play the game! It is included for those read- 
ers interested in assembly language. 

Follow the instructions below to make either a cas- 
sette or disk version of TwoGun. 

Cassette instructions. 

1 . Type Listing 1 into your computer using the 
BASIC cartridge and verify your typing with 
Unicheck (see page 24). 

2. Type RUN and press RETURN. The pro- 
gram will begin and ask: 

MAKE CASSETTE Cei OR DISK tlJ? 

Type and press RETURN. The program will 
begin checking the DATA statements, printing 
the line number of each as it goes. It will alert 
you if it finds any problems. Fix any incorrect 

(continued on page 74) 



PAGE 74 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



lines and re-RUN the program, if necessary, un- 
til all errors are eliminated. 

3. When all of your DATA lines are correct, 
the computer will beep twice and prompt you to 
READY CASSETTE AND PRESS RETURN. 
Now, insert a blank cassette in your recorder, 
press RECORD and PLAY simultaneously and 
hit RETURN. The message WRITING FILE will 
appear, and the program will create a machine 
language boot tape version of TwoGun, print- 
ing each DATA line number as it goes. When 
you see the READY prompt, the game is recorded 
and ready to play. CSAVE the BASIC program 
onto a separate tape before continuing. 

4. To play the game, rewind the tape created 
by the BASIC program to the beginning. Turn 
your computer OFF and remove all cartridges. 
Press the PLAY button on your recorder and turn 
ON your computer, holding down the START 
key. If you have a 600 or 800XL computer, you 
must hold the START and OPTION keys when 
you turn on the power. The computer will "beep" 
once. Hit the RETURN key, and TwoGun will 
load and run automatically. 

Disk instructions. 

1. Type Listing 1 into your computer, using the 
BASIC cartridge and verify your typing with 
Unicheck (see page 24). 

2. Type RUN and press RETURN. The pro- 
gram will ask: 

HAKE CASSETTE (0) OR DISK CD? 

Type J and press RETURN. The program will 
begin checking the DATA lines, printing the line 
number of each statement as it goes. It will alert 
you if it finds any problems. Fix incorrect lines 
and re-RUN the program, if necessary, until all 
errors are eliminated. 

3. When all DATA lines are correct, you will 
be prompted to INSERT DISK WITH DOS, 
PRESS RETURN. Put a disk containing DOS 
2. OS into drive #1 and press RETURN. The mes- 
sage WRITING FILE will appear, and the pro- 
gram will create an AUTORUN.SYS file on the 
disk, displaying each DATA line number as it 
goes. When the READY prompt appears, the 
game is ready to play. Be sure the BASIC pro- 
gram is SAVEd before continuing. 

4. To play the game, insert the disk contain- 
ing the AUTORUN.SYS file into drive #1. Turn 
your computer OFF, remove all cartridges and 
turn the computer back ON. TwoGun will load 
and run automatically. 

How to play. 
In TwoGun, shooting your opponent scores a point 
. .and causes him to fall down dead. Bullets can be 



obtained by touching the flashing gun that appears 
at random. This also causes a cactus (in your color) 
to appear in the gun's position. 

Bullets are indicated at the top of the screen next 
to the score. Your cacti slow down your opponent, 
as well as stop his bullets. Rocks, on the other hand, 
ricochet bullets at random. They appear when you've 
shot your opponent's cactus. 




TwoGun. 

Watch for the players to change color. Flashing grey 
means the player cannot move; flashing green means 
he is low on ammunition. 

Little gravestones, acting like rocks, will appear af- 
ter every death — to the tune of Taps. Home on the 
Range runs throughout the game. 

Shoot 'em up! 

My first game creation, TwoGun was built with 
APX's editor. The source code is in macro assembly 
form. 

Practice your draw. TwoGun should keep you in 
top gunfighting shape just in case the villains ride 
into town. D 

Listing 1. 

10 REN ««« TMOGUN *** 

20 TRAP 20:? "MAKE CASSETTE COJ , OR 01 
5K tl}";:IHPUT DSK:IF DSK>1 THEN 20 
30 TRAP 4eeee:DATA 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,^ 
,0,0,0,0,0.0,0,10,11,12,13,14,15 
40 DIM DATS C91), HEX €22) : FOR K=0 TO 22: 
READ N : HEX CX)=N: NEXT X : LINE=990 :RESTOR 
E 1000: TRAP 120:? "CHECKING DATA" 
50 LIHE=LIHE+10:? "LINE:"; LINE: READ DA 
T$:IF LENCDAT$)<>90 THEM 220 
60 DATLIN=PEEK(183)+PEEKtl84)«256:IF D 
ATLINOLINE then ? "LINE ";LINE;" MISS 
ING!":END 

70 FOR X=l TO 89 STEP 2 : D1=ASC tDATS tX, 
X)J-48:D2=ASCtDAT$CX+l,X*lJ)-48:BYTE3H 
EXCDl)«16HhHEXCD2) 

80 IF PASS=2 THEN PUT ttl, BYTE : NEXT X:R 
EAD CHKSUM:GOTD 50 

90 TOTAL=TOTAL+BVTE:IF T0TAL>999 THEN 
T0TAL=T0TAL-1000 

100 NEXT X:READ CHKSUM:IF TOTAL=CHKSUH 
THEN SO 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 75 



3, PRE55 RET 
:OPEH IJ1,8,0 

:PUT ltl,e:PUT 



lie GOTO 220 

120 IF PEEKtl95)<>6 THEM 220 

130 IF PASS=0 THEN 170 

140 IF NOT D5K THEN 160 

150 PUT ttl,224:PUT ttl,2:PUT tll,225:PUT 

ttl,2:PUT ttl,e:PUT ttl,32:CL0SE ttl:END 
160 FOR X=l TO 97: PUT ttl,0:NE}{T K:CL05 
E ttllEND 

170 IF NOT D5K THEN 200 
180 ? "INSERT DISK NITH D 
URN";:DIH INI(1):INPUT IN 
.■'D:flUTORUM.SYS" 
190 PUT til, 255: PUT ttl,255 

ttl,32:PUT ttl,24e:PUT ttl, 40: GOTO 210 
200 ? "READY CASSETTE AND PRESS RETURN 
";:OPEH ttl,8,128,"C:":RE5T0RE 230:F0R 
X=l TO 40: READ N:PUT ttl,N:NEKT M 
210 ? :? "WRITING FILE":PASS=2:LINE=99 
0: RESTORE 1000: TRAP 120: GOTO 50 
220 ? "BAD DATA: LINE "; LINE: END 
230 DATA 0,19,216,31,255,31,169,0,141, 
47,2,169,60,141,2,211,169,0,141,231,2, 
133,14,169,56,141,232,2 

240 DATA 133,15,169,0,133,10,169,32,13 
3,11,24,96 

1000 DATA 2O65E42OE9222ODE22A9D38D3002 
A9288D3102A92E8D2F02A938SD07D4A9e38DlD 
DOA9eO8DOCDOA9188D6F02A9,6e6 
1010 DATA e08DO8D2A9O68DC602A9AA8DC7O2 
A2OOBDOOEO9DO03OBDOOE19DO031E8DOFlA93e 
8DF4e2A248BDCB279DO830CA,927 
1020 DATA 1OF7A9OOA27F958OCA10FBA2O79D 
OeDOCAlOFAA90O8583A223AeOOA9e62O5CE4A2 
12BD8C26BC9F2699O038CA1O,72 
1030 DATA F4A20FA058BD8328998e3A889900 
3A88CAieF2A207A058BDD32799803A99813A99 
823A99833ABDDB2799O03B99 , 285 
1040 DATA ei3B99023B99033B88888888CA10 
DBA9e38DO8D08DO9DO8DOAD0A9368DCOO2A9C2 
8DCie2A90e8DC2O2A9788DOe, 200 
1050 DATA D0A9A88D01D0A9488D0200A94ASD 
2327A9O18DeD27A9O18589A220ADC40248ADC5 
e28DC402688DC502A9ie8585,287 
1060 DATA A585DOFCCADOE72eE922A9078581 
A9OO8583A2O79DOOD2CAlOFAADOAD2e901858E 
A9Oe8DO8DO8DO9D085908594,98O 
1070 DATA 8D1527858B858A85918592A9028D 
e0D2A9AA8D03D2A9FF858685878588A213BD78 
269DDC38CA1OF7A681A51409,639 
1080 DATA 079DCOO2EO02B0O729Fee90A9DC4 
02AD1FDO2901DOE72OE92220DE22AD1FDO2901 
FOF9A9F28DC8O2A9BA8DC702,935 
1090 DATA A2OlA91A9DCeO2BDC72709O49DC4 
O2BDC92795AA95AEA93O95AC95BOA90O95A495 
9A95fl295BE95A695A8A90395,761 
1100 DATA 9CCA1OD18D1EDOA9O18583A9O085 
84858AA580F0FCA584F0034ClC21A9e08580A2 
01B5AC18691E9596BDC72709,164 
1110 DATA e69598A590FO12B5A4FeO4A90495 
98B59CC902B004A9CA9598CA10D9A261AD0BD4 
8DOAD4D596DO0748B5989D12,8 
1120 DATA D068CAieF2C97O9OE6A2eiBD04DO 
3DCO2e48D5A8Fei29ei0B59ADeeCB5A2DOO8A9 
2D95fl4A91O85886895A0BDO4,886 
1130 DATA D02908Fe22A9108588A482BDB826 
9914388D1ED0AD0AD22903090118759C959CAD 
0AD2894e858EA58EDeOEAD0A,68e 
1140 DATA D2D02EA482A9OO991438F0E7C68E 
DO212OB022FO11293FC9O2FeOBC982F0FlA9OO 
991438FeEA8482A9C1991438, 488 
1150 DATA A9108588CA3OO34C27224CD321AD 
0AD2C9C8B0F9A8B91438600A0A858D8AeA18e5 
8D60i875B84A4A4A28BC2285,18 
1160 DATA 8DB5B61869014A4A4A18658DA860 
A2FOA9OO9DFF37CADOFA6OA27FA9e09D8O399D 
OO3A9D8O3A9DOO3B9D803BCA,318 
1170 DATA 10EE6OA901858eC685A589F03CCE 
6D27AD6D27D01AEE2327AD2327C94A90e5A901 
8D2327AABDeD278D6D27A90A,284 
1180 DATA 858CAE2327BD23278D06D2A58529 
O1DOOBC68CA58C30O509AO8DO7D2A583DOO34C 
7526C6911033A91F8591A592,144 
1190 DATA 49108592A59O49O1859OADOAD2O9 
06CDC7O2FeF68DC7e2A586iei2A5A425A5DOOC 
A69OBDE6268DO0D2A9O8858B,465 
1200 DATA A58BFO0FC68BA5861OF6A58BO98O 
8DOlD23eOBA5863O07C68629OF8DOlD2A5873e 
ieCe87Ae87BDF42e8De3D2BD,880 



1210 DATA E8268DO2D2A588301OCe88A6888A 

094eSDO5D2BDFD268DO4D2AC1527DeeAA58AlO 

22A9ei8589DO2BA90e8589CE,45 

1220 DATA 1C27101SB91C278D1C27B915278D 

O6D2A9ie858ACE1527A58529OlD0O9Ce8AA58A 

09A08D07D2A201B59AF012A9,579 

1230 DATA O19De8DOD69ADOe9A94e95A2A90e 

9De8DOB5A2FO02DeA2B5A4F0O8D6A4DO04A92O 

9SA2BCBC26A9e5858FB59C95,630 

1240 DATA 9EB59EC9O4B0OC186984990e38A9 

ee959EF00CA988990038B59E38E904959EC8C6 

8FD0DDBDeCDe3DC026F00BB5, 273 

1250 DATA AE95AAB5B095AC4C7724B5AA95AE 

B5AC95BeBC7802B9C62695B21875AAC998B00C 

858DB5AS1SA4D004A58D95AA,582 

1260 DATA B9D62e95B41875ACC940BeeC858D 

B5A815A4DOO4A5SD95ACB5ASF042BD8402FO3D 

B5B215B4D0e6854D95A8F031 , 630 

1270 DATA B59CF0F6B59A15A4D027D69CA901 

95A6A90095A8A9188586B5AA1869O395B6B5AC 

95B8B5B2eA0A95BAB5B4OA95, 755 

1280 DATA BC4CFD24BD84O2DO08B5AeDOO4A9 

0195A8BDO8DO3DCO26FO6BA9O095A6A90F2OCe 

22A989990038BCBE2eB99A00,138 

1290 DATA FO0eA9AO95A4DO4FA9O08DlC27A9 

Oe8D1527A9BO999AeOA9A899A40OF8B5BE1869 

01D895BE48BCBA2629OF1DB6, 427 

1300 DATA 2699e038684A4A4A4AlDB62699FF 

3729eFC9O19O158681BCBE26A90099COO2A9ee 

8583A90185844Ce72eB5AA18,8e4 

1310 DATA 69309D00De8A48BDB22e8595BDB4 

2e8594A9B08593B5A4DOlBA5928593B5A8Fei3 

BD7SO2C90FFe0CB59CFOO8BC,923 

1320 DATA 7802B9B7278593B5AC186928A8B5 

9AF0O4A9A08593A59318690FAABD1328919488 

CAE4931OF568AABSA6D017B5, 784 

1330 DATA B818691FA8B980393DC42e998e39 

A9O09De4DO4C612eBDOODe3DCO2eFOllA9e72e 

C622A983991438A91085884C,492 

1340 DATA SB26BDOOD02904FeiDA9OA8587AD 

OAD229OFA8B9C62619D626FOF2B9C6260A95BA 

B9D62695BCB5Bei875BAC99E,165 

1350 DATA B03295Bei8693O9DO4DOB5B81869 

1FA8B98O393DC426998039B5B81875BCC950BO 

1295B818691FA8B980391DC2, 387 

1360 DATA 26998O394C6126A9O095A695A8CA 

3eO34C06248DlEDeADlFD029OlD0O4A9ei8584 

4CDlE7B0B2A5B3B30eF3F4El , 731 

1370 DATA F2F400B4AF00A2A5A7A9AE34772F 

67356E6279636F6E7261647461746765293D51 

65798D3F4042434445464749,433 

1380 DATA 4A4B4C4D3A3A0O8O1050O242O113 

02ODO18OO2OlO3OCFCF3OOOOOOOeOOO101OlOO 

FFFFFFOOOeOOOeOOeOOOeOOO , 460 

1390 DATA eiFF000001FF00e001FFe00Aie28 

18100C0A09eS0A0Fiei040ACADAEAFADAAAeA2 

A0eA0BOAO9OBOA0807O9eceD,135 

1400 DATA OAO6O5O8OAOFlOOF0AO6e7OAOAOe 

51607960797900400810400810006066514846 

5155603C3C3C3C3C35515151,366 

1410 DATA 5551486C6C5148405155603C3C3C 

3C3C40485155514851353C4e48404851515151 

5551486C6C5148405155603C,837 

1420 DATA 3C3C3C3C4e485155514851001010 

10102008081808102008081808101010104010 

101010200808180818200808, 189 

1430 DATA 1808101888104030180810301018 

88101010104010101010200808188810200808 

180810101010800000000000,101 

1440 DATA 2030400050607000809000703010 

88O041CF7FFOF8EOOei81BlBDBDFD8F818OOee 

307C72FEFF1FOO0OOOFFOOFF,572 

1450 DATA OOOOOO8O8OFF8OFF8O0O00AOA0FF 

AeFFAe0000A8ASFFA8FFA80000AAAAFFAAFFAA 

00O0183C18183C7E7EOO287C,724 

1460 DATA 547C387CBABABA792828680CeoeO 

143E2A3ElC3E5D5D5D9E1414163e0004147C68 

743878BCBAB9782828282C60,293 

1470 DATA 04147C69763C7SB8BSB878282828 

2C6004147C6874387FB8B8BS782828282C602e 

283E162E1C1E3D5D9D1E1414.90O 

1480 DATA 14340620283E96eE3ClElDlDlDlE 

14141434062O283E162E1CFE1D1D1D1E141414 

3406e4147C6874387EBABABA,524 

1490 DATA 7A28282S2C602e287E566E5C7ElD 

lDlDlE14141434O60OOOOOOeOOOOeoeOOOO01O 

3BBBFFeOOe00143E2A3ElC3E , 546 



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Microprose 

Solo Fligtlt $22,75 

NATO $22.75 

Spitfire $19.95 

F-15 Strike $22,75 



Spinnal(er 

Alphabet $18,75 

Story Machine $21,75 

Kids on Keys ,,, $18,75 

Grandma $19,75 

Snooper Troop $22,75 

Broderbund 

Bank St. Writer $42,75 

Spellmaker $19,95 

Mask of Sun $24,95 

Chopllfter $22,95 

Lode Runner $22,95 



BUSINESS 

VISICALC , $159 75 

LETTER PERFECT R , 59 00 
DATA PERFECT $89 75 

FILE MANAGER $69 75 

Scarborough 

Songwriter $24,75 

Picturewrit $24,75 

Mastertype $24,75 

SSI 

Baseball $22,75 

Questron $26,75 

50 Missions $21,75 



Synapse 

Synfile $48,95 

Syncalc $48,95 

Syncomm $29.95 

Syntrend $48.95 

Graphics Tablet 

Superskelch $32.95 

Kolala $69 95 

THE ILLUSTRATOR $99,95 

SPIDER EATER, $22 50 

SPEEICOPTER $27 75 

SUB LOGIC 

FlightSimulatorll Atari ,,,32,75 



TOLL FREE 1-800-233-8760 



09 TO ORDER 

CALL TOLL FREE Oi 

800-233-8760 



or send order to 
Lyco Computer 
P O Bo. 6088 
Customer Set-vice 1-71 7-327-1 825 Jersey Shore PA 17740 



RISK FREE POLICY 

In-stock item shipped within 24 hours of order. No deposit on C,0,D, 
orders. Free shipping on prepaid cash orders within the Continental U.S, 
PA residents add sales tax, APO, FRO, and I nternational orders add $5,00 
plus 3% for priority mail service. Advertised prices show 4% discount for 
cash, add 4% lor Master Card or Visa. Personal checks require 4 weeks 
clearance before shipping. All items subject to change without notice. 



I CIRCLE #129 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 77 



1500 DATA SD5D5DSD14141436e078707e4700 
38e7870707870707e707870741D3288ee000ee 
888080880088008888088008 , 888 



CHECKSUM DATA. 

(see page 24) 



18 DATA 698,351,436,811, 
3,555,573,694,613,23,285 
160 l>ATA 769,198,962,628 
5,169,894,188,27,33,792, 
1868 DATA 818,988,986,35 
94,846,94,72,87,840,879, 
1218 DATA 137,824,974,8, 
,21,733,937,979,842,125, 
1360 DATA 928,774,82,781 
78,541,6,841,715,741,425 



423,729,288,68 

,214,7194 

,491,38,155,11 

849,6284 

,918,822,843,8 

855,9961 

187,37,148,988 

859,7775 

,351,297,987,6 

,909,8976 



Assembly listing. 



TITLE -TWOaUN - B 3hoatouf 
aUBTTL 'By Conrad Tatgs 84" 



CONSOL 


EQU *D01F iconaola iwltch 


RANDOM 


EQU *D20A 1 random byts 


HP03PB 


EQU •0000 (horizontal 


nepF 


EQU (0000 icolllliona 


naPL 


EOU *D008 


P0PF 


EQU »D004 




ORG »80 lPaq« imra 


VBIDQ 


DS 




(vertical blank ahaka 


U INNER 


DS 




latarta glow 


LOOT 


D8 




1 whara loot la 


ENABLE 


DS 




IVBI allowanca 


DOCPU 


D3 




Igama avmr flag 
(Inc'ad mvmry VBl 


TIMER 


DS 




aNSl 


DS 




Iflrlna aound 
irlcocnat 


9ND2 


DS 




3ND3 


D3 




i f wooop 


DOHOME 


DS 




(flag for Itttla mualc 


VOLUME 


DS 




Itapa nota valuaa 


V0L2 


DS 




Ifootatap voluaa 
1 tuna voluma 


aUSTAI 


DS 




TEMP 


DS 




1 Mark 


NOLOOT 


DS 




1 countdown 


COUNT 


DS 




i countar 


ONOFF 


DS 




■foot aMttch 


STEPTM 


DS 




Itlna for naKt atap 


STEP 


D3 




latap polntar 


PICTUR 


DS 




IfraSa*^ 


PIC 


DS 


2 


iPaga raro PM point 


CHANSE 


DS 


2 


IMhara to changa color 


NEUCOL 


DS 


2 


iwhat color to changa 


DEAD 


DS 


2 


Idaad flag 


AMMOS 


DS 


2 


Ihullata 


AMMOSZ 


DS 


2 


(for dlaplaylng 


PLPF2 


DS 


2 




NOCOL 


DS 


2 


laftar a colllalon 


NOMOVE 


DS 


2 


laftar a ahot 


MISSLF 


DS 


2 


1 1 ■ ahoatlng 


PREBSF 


DS 


2 


1 1 - atnlng 


HORIZ 


DS 


2 


IcoMboy poaltlon 


VERT 


DS 


2 




H0RIZ2 


DS 


2 


Ipravloualy 


VERT2 


DS 


2 




DIRK 


DS 


2 


lain direction 


DIRY 


DS 


2 




SHORIZ 


DS 


2 


1 ahot poaltlon 


3HVERT 


DS 


2 




3HDIRX 


DS 


2 


lahot direction 


3HDIRY 


DS 


2 




3C0RE 


DS 


2 


IBCD player acore 




ASSERT • < «100 Ipaga z«ro< 


PMHORZ 




«30 (For acrvan 


PMVERT 




•28 |off««ts 


PMTITL 




PMVERT+*30 ifar titla paga 


AMMO 




1 


(Character codea 


CACTUS 




2 




ROCK 




3 




CHAMMO 




4 


Ibullata character 


BRAVE 




9 


1 aravaatone 


HOMES 




74 rianath a+ aona 


CHR3ET 


EQU 


•3000 (nanory apace 


PMAREA 


EQU 


• 3800 


DI8P 


EQU 


PMAREA lacreen aemory 


MIS 


EQU 


PMAREA+»18» 


PLB 


EQU 


PMAREA'r*200 


PLl 


EQU 


PMAREA'F*280 


PL2 


EQU 


PMAREAi-*300 


PL3 


EQU 


PMAREA+^380 


PLAREA 


EQU 


DI8P+20 Iplay area 




ORQ 


• 2000 



START 
NQSND8 



3BR •E46S Unit aound 

jaR PMCLR (clear buffer 

JSR CLDISP (Clear acreen 

LDA •LOW DLIST 

STA (230 

LDA WHIBH DLIST 

STA •ZSl 

LDA »*2E 

STA »22F (P/M 

LDA WHIBH PMAREA 

STA ^0407 

LDA «3 

STA •D01D (QRACTL 

LDA •0 



STA •D00C (SIZEM 

LDA ••18 

STA •26F (PRIOR 

LDA 00 

STA •D208 (Intt 

LDA ••06 (light grey 

STA •2CA (rocka 

LDA ••AA 

STA •ZC? (bulleta 



LDX 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
BTA 
INK 
8NE 
LDA 
STA 
LDX 
LDA 
STA 
DEX 
BPL 
LDA 
LDX 
STA 
DEX 
BPL 
LDX 
STA 
DEX 
BPL 



• 

•E000,X (Bove ROM aet 
CHRSET, X 
•E100,X 
CHRSETi-al00,X 

MOVE IT 

•HIGH CHRSET 

736 (point to new one 

••4B (aove 9 charactera 

NEMSET.X (and copy naH 

CHRSET+8,X 

NEMCHR 

• 

• •7F 

•80, X (zero varlablea 

CLPZER 

• 7 

HPOSP0,X (horlrontala 

ZHORIZ 



LDA ^0 

STA ENABLE (Not yet 

LDX •HISH VBLANK (Set up 

LDY »LOW VBLANK ( NMI 

LDA »t, 

JSR ^£430 

LDX WIS (19 charactera 

LDA CHRS.X 

LDY CHRPOS.X 

STA DISP.Y (put to acreen 

DEX 

BPL PRINT 



LDX 
LDY 
LDA 
STA 
DEY 
STA 
DEY 
DEX 
BPL 
LDX 
LDY 
LDA 
STA 
STA 
STA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
STA 
STA 
STA 
DEY 
DEY 
DEY 
DEY 
DEX 
BPL 



• •F 

•PMTITL 
THEMAN.X 
PL0,Y 

PL0,Y 



DOMAN 

• •7 

•PMTITL 

NEMSET-i-8, X 

PLl.Y 

PLl-t-l.Y 

PL1+2|y 

PL1+3,Y 

NEWSET+»10, 

PL2,Y 

PL2+l,Y 

PL2+Z,Y 

PL2+3.Y 



(dlaplay dudea 



LDA 
STA 
STA 
8TA 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 

LDX 
LDA 
PHA 
LDA 
STA 
PLA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
BNE 
DEX 
BNE 
JSR 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
LDX 
STA 
DEX 
BPL 
LDA 
ORA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
STA 
ata 
STA 
STA 
STA 
STA 
STA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 



•3 

•D00a (K4 width 

• D009 

• D00A 

••36 (red cowboy 

• 2C0 

••C2 (green cactua 

• 2C1 

••06 (grey rocka 

• 2C2 

••78 (horlzontala 

• D000 

• •A8 

• D001 

• •48 

• D002 

•HOMES (aet It up. . . 

HOMEON 

•1 (and 

DURAT2 

•1 (atart the tune... 

DOHOME 

•32 

• 2C4 (awltch »2C* >< •ZCS 

• 2CS 

• 2C4 

• 2C3 

•16 (quarter of a aecond 

TIMER 

TIMER 

TWAITA 

ASA IN 

PMCLR (clear PM title 

•7 (glow title 

WINNER 

• 
ENABLE 

• 7 
•D200,X 

NOaNDS 

RANDOM 

ttt (at leaat one 

NOLOOT (aet up timer 

• 

• D00a 

• D009 
ONOFF 
PIC 
TAPS 
V0L2 
VOLUME 
STEPTM 
STEP 

•2 (Sound frea' 
•D200 (AUDFl 

• •AA 

•D203 (Bound Ctrl 2 

• •FF 



PAGE 78 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



aTA SNDl 
STA aND2 
STA aND3 

LDX tl9 

LDA PRESan.X IxrltB 

STA DiaP+Z2B,X 

DEX 

BPL PRESS 

LDX WINNER 
LDA (14 laiOH 
ORA #7 
STA *2C0,X 
CPX »2 
BCa DDQAME 
AND «»FI> 
DRA W«A 
aTA »2C4,X 
LDA C0N80L 
AND *1 I START? 
BNE DOMN 
J8R PHCLR 
JSR CLDiaP 

LDA CONSOL 

AND Vl iLat gn yet? 

BEQ UP 



1 oattm 
: CPU3 



LOOTDN 
: CPU2 



LDA 
STA 
LDA 
aTA 
LDX 
SETUP LDA 
3TA 
LDA 
ORA 
STA 
LDA 
aTA 
STA 
LDA 
aTA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
aTA 
STA 
3TA 
3TA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
DEX 
BPL 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
STA 



#«F2 I brown 

*2C8 

«*BA I col or of loot 

»2C7 

Wl I Sat up aa«« 

•tlA Iflaahy 

•2C0.X icoLpne 

TCOLOR.X 

•4 

»2C4,X ICOLPFB 

THORIZ.X 

HDRIZ.X 

H0RIZ2,x lold 

lt*3e 

VERT.X 

VERT2,X lold 

• 

NOnOVE.X 

DEAD. X 

NOCQL.X 

score'x 

NISSLP.X 
PRESSF.X 
#3 IglVB 
AMMQ3, X 

SETUP 

*D01E IHITCLR 

»1 I Now it can 

ENABLE 

«0 

DDCPU 

VOLUME I qui at I 



:CPU3. 
RECPU 

RANDY 



l«tc... 

hln ■one! 



» CPU movaa th« random gun, chacka 
* for lt*B colliaian, and doaa color 

CPU PRDC 

LDA VBIDO (Halt for VBI 

BEQ CPU 

LDA DOCPU land gaaa? 

BEQ :CPU.2 

JMP START ido It again! 
:CPU.2 LDA #0 

aTA VBIDO 

LDX •! 
•atvp LDA VERT.X 

CLC 

ADC «30 INhera to changa 

aTA CHAMSE.X 

LDA TCOLOR.X 

ORA ^6 

STA NEWCQL.X 

LDA ONOFF laltarnata 

BEQ 8ETVP3 inatural color 

LDA NOMDVE.X 

BEQ aETVP2 

LDA *4 

aTA NEMCOL.X Idarkan him! 
3ETVP2 LDA AHMOa.X 

CMP »2 

BCa 8ETVP3 

LDA ttacA lanbaraaaRtant 

STA NEWCOL.X 
aETVP3 DEX 

BPL SETVP 
KERNEL LDX *1 

LDA *D40B 

STA *D40A IMSYNC 
CKVP CMP CHANBE.X itloa to changa? 

BNE nochan 



LDA NEWCOL.X 

STA »D012.X 

PLA 

DEX 

BPL CKVP 

CMP »»70 

BCC KERNEL 



Igat naM color 



LDX 
.-CPUl LDA 
AND 
PHA 
CMP 
BEQ 
BCC 
LDA 
BNE 
LDA 
BNE 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 

: CPUl. 2 PLA 
3TA 
LDA 
AND 
BEQ 
LDA 
STA 
LDY 
LDA 
STA 
STA 
LDA 
AND 
ORA 
CLC 



• 1 

PBPF.X ihavs Ha run Into 

MISHIT, X la cactua? 

Ihold on to 

PLPF2, X 

: CPUl. 2 

! CPUl. 2 

DEAD.X lO.K. If daad... 

: CPUl. 2 

NOCOL.X lor alraady hit 

: CPUl. 2 

#43 I . 73 aaconda 

NOMDVE,X I atop thara 

»*10 latart bolng 

3ND3 

PLPF2,X iramambar It 

PaPF,X 

»S I got tha loot? 

:CPU3 

l»*10 

SND3 Ibolng 

LOOT 

SOTIT.X laaka a cactua 

PLAREA,Y 

•D01E IHITCLR 

RANDOM 

»3 

• 1 



ADC AMMOS.X 

STA AMMOS.X 

LDA RANDOM iwalt a llttla 

ORA tt*40 I not zaro 

STA NOLOOT 

LDA NOLOOT iwaltlng? 

BNE lootdn 

LDA RANDOM Ichanca It 

BNE :CPU3.1 

LDY LOOT laraaa old ona 

LDA »0 

STA DISP+20,y 

BEQ LOOTTM 

DEC NOLOOT 

BNE :CPU3. 1 

JSR RANDY Ihlda loot 

BEQ DOLDOT 

AND #*3F iraaova color 

CMP #CACTUS 

BEQ DOLOOT 

CMP IILOOT I tha loot? 

BEQ :CPU2 

LDA 40 laraaa it 

STA PLAREA.Y 

BEQ :CPU2 tnoH try again 

STY LOOT luaa thla valua 

LDA «AMMD OR »CB I PF3 

STA PLAREA.Y 

LDA l»«10 

STA SND3 Ibolnn 

DEX 

BMl RECPU 

JMP :CPU1 

JMP CPU 

3UBTTL •Subroutlnaa- 

LDA RANDOM Iflnd a random 

CMP «200 Ibyta on acraan 

BCa RANDY 

TAY land gat Ita cantantm 

LDA PLAREA.Y 

RTa 

• Multiply by 20 for icrmmn plotting 

MULT20 ASL A I »2 

ASL A I •4 

STA TEMP 

ASL A I as 

ASL A l»16 
CLC 

ADC TEMP I »20 
RTS 

» Flnda acraan location from a nlaala 

PMDISP CLC loffaat la on A 

ADC SHVERT.X Igat horizontal 

LSR A 

LBR A 

LSR A I /a 

JSR MULT20 itlaaa 20 

aTA TEMP Ihold 

LDA BHORIZ, X 

CLC 

ADC *1 

LSR A 

LSR A 

LSR A I /a 

ADC TEMP I add on to 
TAY land put In Y 
RTS 

CLDISP LDX ^240 IClaar acraan 

LDA «0 

CLEAR STA DI8P-1,X 

DEX 

BNE CLEAR 

RTS 

PMCLR LDX »»7F Iclaar out P/M 

LDA «0 
ZPLYR STA Mla.X 

STA PL0,X 

STA PLl.X 

aTA PL2;x 

aTA PL3, X 

DEX 

BPL ZPLYR 

RTa 

aUBTTL "Tha Vartlcal Blank" 

• Vartlcal BLANK doaa avarythlng alaa 

VBLANK PROC 

LDA #1 iVBI call flag 
STA VBIDO ^ 

DEC TIMER 

LDA DOHOHE I Homa on tha rmna* 

BEQ CKENAB 

DEC DURAT2 Icount It down 

LDA DURAT2 

BNE DONOTE 

INC HOMEDN Inaxt nota 

LDA HOMEON 

CMP tlHOMES I dona yat? 

BCC NEWDUR 

LDA *1 lyaa, atart again 

STA HQMEON ^ 

NEWDUR TAX I nota gattar 

LDA DURATZTX 

STA DURAT2 

LDA »»A latart voluffla 

STA SUSTAI 
DONOTE LDX HOMEON 

LDA TIMER idacraaaa voluma? 
AND »l 
BNE CKENAB 

DEC SUSTAI la llttla aoftar 
LDA SUSTAI 

BHl CKENAB mot too much! 
ORA »*A0 ladiuat aound 
STA »D2a7 
CKENAB LDA ENABLE lahauld ua? 
BNE ;L1 
JMP L00P6 

:li dec steptm 

BPL DOSNDS 

LDA »»1F IHalt for naxt 

STA STEPTM 

LDA 3TEP itaka a atap ! 

EOR »*10 *^ 

STA STEP 



LOOP 
LODPl 



AHVEl 
DECMOV 



aaf aty 



LDA ONOFF 

EOR 111 

STA ONOFF 

LDA RANDOM 

ORA 116 

CMP •2C7 

BEQ NEMAMO 

STA a2C7 Inaw ammo color 

LDA SNDl mot during a ahot! 

BPL DOSNDa 

LDA NOMOVE I If not moving 

AND NOMOVE-M 

BNE DOaNDS 

LDX ONOFF 

LDA FEET.X I maka footatapa 

STA »D20B 

LDA »a 

STA V0L2 

LDA V0L2 

BEQ DOBNDl 

DEC V0L2 

LDA 3ND1 

BPL DOSNDS 

LDA V0L2 

ORA #*e0 Idacraaaa voluna 

STA *D20t 

BMI CKSND2 

LDA SNDl Igunahat 

BMl CKaND2 

DEC SNDl 

AMD tt*F 

STA •D201 

LDA aND2 

BMI CK3ND3 

DEC SND2 

LDX aND2 

LDA C0NT2.X 

STA •D203 

LDA FRE02.X 

STA »D202 

LDA 3ND3 Ibotna 

BMI CKTAPS 

DEC SND3 

LDX SND3 

TXA luaa polntar aa voluma 

ORA »*40 

STA *D20S IAUDC3 

LDA FREQ3,X 

STA •D204 IAUDF3 

LDY TAPS 

BNE D0TAP8 

LDA VOLUME I of laat nota? 

BPL TAPS2 

LDA #1 iwa'ra dona! 

STA DOHOME 

BNE LOOP 

LDA *0 iraaat flag 

STA DOHOME 

DEC DURAT inota langth 

BPL TAPS2 

LDA DURAT. Y 

STA DURAT 

LDA TAPa.Y maw nota 

3TA *D20& IAUDF4 

LDA tt*10 inaw voluma 

STA VOLUME 

DEC TAPS inaxt nota 

LDA TIMER 

AND *1 

BNE LOOP 

DEC VOLUME 

LDA VOLUME 

ORA «*A0 

STA »D2B7 

LDX •! 

LDA DEAD.X 16 faat undar? 

BEQ ALIvfel 

LDA ai lalongata him 

STA »D008,X 

DEC DEAD.X land dacraaant 

BNE ALIVEl 

LDA «*40 

STA NOCOL.X 

LDA tt0 I back to normal 

STA »D00a,X 

LDA NOCOL.X 

BEQ DECMOV 

DEC NOCOL.X 

LDA NOMDVE.X I movamant? 

BEQ SHOAMM 

DEC NOMDVE.X 

BNE SHOAMM 

LDA *»20 

STA NOCOL.X 

LDY WHERE2.X Igat poalf 

LDA »S 

STA COUNT 

LDA AMMOS.X Irapllcata 

STA AMM032.X 

LDA AMM032:x I ammo left 

CMP »4 

BCS SH0An2 I full four? 

CLC Ipartlal 

ADC OCHAMMO OR *80 

8TA DiaP.Y 

LDA #0 mo mora 

STA AMM032.X 

BEQ SHOAMS 

LDA •CHAnMa'r4 OR «S0 

3TA DI3P.Y 

LDA AMM032.X 

3EC 

BBC «4 

STA AMM0S2.X 

INY I go right ona 

DEC COUNT 

BNE EHOAMi 

LDA *D00C, X 

AND MISHIT, X lothar gUy? 

BEQ aafety 

LDA H0RIZ2,X I mova back! 

STA HORIZ.X 

LDA VERT2,X 

STA VERT, X 

JMP SETSTK 

LDA HORIZ.X laafa placa! 

STA HORlzi.X 

LDA VERT. X 

STA VERT2,X 

LDY »27B, X lY la STICK 

LDA TDIRX.Y 

STA DIRX.X Ihold diractlon 

CLC 

ADC HORIZ.X Inaw HORIZ 

CMP #»7a I off of acraan? 

BCS CKVERT 

STA TEMP Ino... could uaa 

LDA PRESaF.X lunlaaa aiming 

ORA NOMOVE.X 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 79 



BNE CKVERT 

LDft TEMP 

STA HORIZ.X lupdJita tt 



aaill* for VERT 



CKVERT LDfl TDIRY.Y 
8TA DIRY.X 

ftDC VERT.X 
CMP t*40 
BCS CKPRES 
STA TEMP 
LDA PRESSF.X 
ORA NOMOVE.X 
BNE CKPRES 
LDA TEMP 
STA VERT.X 

• Javitlck firm button coda: 

• tsBt for amnoa than 

• If not atrln then aat PRESSF 

• If atrlq and PRESSF then fire 

CKPRES LDA PRESSF.X I already? 

BED CKBUTT 

LDA «284.X netting go? 

BEQ CKBUTT 

LDA DIRX.X 

QRA DIRViX 

BNE FIRE lany direction? 
NQFLIP STA 77 I atop attract 

STA PRESSF.X inot proaalng 

BEQ CKBUTT 
FIRE LDA AMMOS.X (any bullBta? 

BEQ NOFHP 

LDA DEAD, X I If dead 

ORA NOMDVE.X I or lemoblle.. 

BNE CKBUTT I don't ahoot • 

DEC AMMOS.X I uae a bullet 

LDA #1 Ihe's ahootlnn 

STA MISSLF.X 

LDA »0 

STA PRESSF.X 

LDA **1S Iflre aound 

STA SNDl 

LDA HORIZ.X make a bullet 

ADC «3 (center It 

STA SHQRIZ.X 

LDA VERT.X 

STA SHVERT.X 

LDA DIRX.X 

ASL A 14 tleea aa faat 

A8L A 

STA SHDIRX.X 

LDA DIRY.X 

ASL A itMtce aa faat 

STA SHDIRY.X 

JMP L00P2 
CKBUTT LDA »284,X |no« button? 

BNE L00P2 

LDA MISSLF.X lor ahoot? 

BNE L00P2 

LDA •! 

STA PRESSF.X ipraaeed... 
L0QP2 LDA MBPL.X 

AND MISHIT. X (player hit? 

BEQ MQVEM 

LDA <t0 I atop ahootlnn 

STA MISSLF.X 

LDA «*F loffeet 

J8R PMDISP iflnd where 

LDA ttQRAVE OR *Be 

STA DISP.Y (put on acreen 

LDY OPPON.X 

LDA DEAD.V (already dead? 

BEQ KILLEH 
LDA tt«A0 (alow shooter 

STA NOMDVE.K 

BNE MOVEM fjMP 
klllern LDA »0 Iplay tape 

STA DURAT 

LDA *6 

STA TAPS 

LDA ease (kill him 

STA DEAD.Y 

LDA VaAS 

STA NOMDVE.Y 

SED 

LDA SCORE, X 

CLC 

ADC «1 (Blve hln 1 point 

CLD 

STA SCORE, X 

PHA (And dlaplay hla acore 

LDY WHERE, X 

AND »»F 

ORA COLSCO.X 

STA DISP.Y 

PLA 

LSR A 

L3R A 

LSR A 

LSR A 

ORA COLSCO, X 

STA DISP-l.Y 

AND <t*F 

CMP »1 (20 polnta wlna 

BCC MOVEM 

8TX WINNER 

LDY OPPON.X 

LDA #0 (darken laaer 

STA »2C0.Y 

LDA »9 

STA ENABLE 

LDA «1 

STA DOCPU 

JMP L00P4 (Reneeber who 



:L2 



LDY 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
CLC 
ADC 
TAY 
LDA 
BEQ 
LDA 

ALIVE LDA 
CLC 
ADC 
TAX 

DRAW LDA 
STA 
DEY 
DEX 
CPX 
BPL 
PLA 
TAX 
LDA 
BNE 
LDA 
CLC 
ADC 
TAY 
LDA 
AND 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
JMP 

MVHORZ LDA 
AND 
BEQ 
LDA 
JSR 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
JMP 

HDRZt: LDA 
AND 
BEQ 
LDA 

H0RZ2: LDA 
AND 
TAY 
LDA 
ORA 
BEQ 
LDA 
ASL 
STA 
LDA 
STA 



H0RZ3: 



•278, X 

PICOfF.Y (According 

PICTUR (to STICK0 

VERT.X 

#PMVERT 

(No nare Y! 

DEAD. X 

ALIVE 

#*A0 (draw dead guv 

PICTUR 

PICTUR 

»*F ( 16 bytes 
(X la eaved on stack 
SHAPE, X (draw him! 
(PIC) I Y 



PICTUR (done yet? 
DRAW 

(restore player X 
MISSLF.X (Should we 
MVHORZ (kill nlsale? 
SHVERT.X (Y not atlck 

•PMVERT-7 

Mia.Y 

BITSOF.X (Out bite 

MIS.Y 

«0 

*D0a4.x (Zero Hposn0 

L0OP3 

M0PF,X (have we hit 

MISHIT, X (a cactus? 

HORZl (no collision 

»7 (offaet 

PMDISP (figure out whera 

»ROCK OR •30 

OISP+Z0.Y (make rock 

**10 (nake bolna 

SND3 

KILMSL (kill nlsale 

M0PF,x (have Me hit a 

•4 (PF2 rock? 

H0RZ3 

•10 (ricochet 

SND2 

RANDOM (new dlrec* 

#»F 

TDIRX, Y 

TDIRY, Y 

H0RZ2 I aoaa delta 

TDIRX, Y 

A (a little slower 

SHDIRX,X 

TDIRY, Y 

SHDIRY.X 



C0NT2 
FRea3 



DURAT 
HOMEON 



LDA SHORIZ.X (Update 

CLC 

ADC SHDIRX.X 

CMP (t»9E (Off screen? 

BCS KILMSL 

STA SHORIZ.X 

CLC 

ADC WPMHORZ I Compenaate 

STA •D004,X 



LDA 
CLC 
ADC 
TAY 
LDA 
AND 
STA 
LDA 
CLC 
ADC 
CMP 
BCS 
STA 
CLC 
ADC 
TAY 
LDA 
ORA 
STA 
JMP 
LDA 
STA 
STA 
DEX 
BMI 
JMP 
STA 
LDA 
AND 
BNE 
LDA 
STA 



SHVERT,X (Remove old 

•PMVERT-9 

MIS, Y 

BIT80F, X 

MIS,Y 

SHVERT,X (Now update 

SHD1RY,X 

••30 (Off ecreen? 

KILMSL 

SHVERT.X 

•PMVERT-9 (Compensate 

MIS.Y 

BITBON.X (Turn on bit 

MIS.Y 

L00P3 

•0 (kill this nlssle 

MISSLF, X 

PRESSF, X 

(NeKt player 

L00P4 (end part of VBI 

LOOPl 

• O01E 
CONSOL 

• 1 
L00P6 

• 1 
DOCPU 



LDA 
CLC 
ADC 
STA 
TXA 
PHA 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
BNE 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
BEQ 
LDA 
CMP 
BEQ 
LDA 
BEQ 



H0RI2, X 

•PMHORZ (Small adjust 
HPOBP0.X (horliontal 



PLOFFl.X (Set Up PM 
PIC+l (painters fa- 
PL0FF2.X (playera 



••B0 (hold him still 

PICTUR 

NOMOVE.X 

: L2 

STEP (now animate 

PICTUR 

PRESSF.X (aiming? 

:L2 

•278. X 

•13 (stick centered? 

:L2 

AMMOS.X tar out? 

:L2 



LOOPi JMP ^£701 (Exit VBI 

SUBTTL -Data Tables' 
a Varloua tables 

PRESSM DB •B0.^B2.*A3,«B3.*B3.0 

DB »F3.^F4,«E1.»F2,»F4,0 

DB •B4,^AF,0,*A2, aAS, *A7 

DB •A9.*AE Ipreas start... 
CHRS DB •34,»77.»2f »67.»35,S6E 

DB * byconr adtatge' 
CHRPOB DB 41 ,61,81, 101:121, 141 

DB 63,64,66,67,68,69,70,71 

DB 73, 74. 73, 76'77 (position 
PLOFFl DB HIQH PL0 ( PM pointers 

DB HIQH PLl 
PL0FF2 DB LOU PL0 

DB LOW PLl 
COLSCO DB *10,^S0 (masks 
OOTIT DB CACTUS OR ^00 ( PF0 

DB CACTUS OR »40 ( PF 1 
WHERE DB 1,19 I score postf 
UHERE2 DB 2,13 I ammo position 
OPPON DB 1,0 (opponent 
MISHIT DB 2,1 (collision checks 
BITSON DB 3, SC (ORA turn ons 
BITSQF DB »FC,»F3 (AND turn offs 
TDIRX DB 0,0,0,0,0.1,1.1 (Stick 

DB 0.*FF.*FF. •PF,0 (deltas 

DB 0,0,0 
TDIRY DB 0,0,0,0.0. l.»FF 

DB 0,0. 1 'SFF, 0,0 

DB 1,»FF,0 
FEET DB 10,16 (footataps 
FREQ2 DB 40,24.16.12,1079,8.10 



DB 13,22,16,64 (ricochet 

DB •AC,*AD,*AE,*AF.^AD.^AA 

DB •A6,»A2;»A0 

DB IB, ll. 16,9, 11, 10,8 (bolng 

DB 7.*, li,li;,i0,i.S,8,lB " 

DB 13,16, 13, I0,2i,^, ie' 10 

DB 

DB (SI, •60, •79 (notea 

DB •60,»79,^79 

DB 

DB 64,8,16,64,8,16 (durations 

DB (Home, hone on the... 

DB 108,108,81,72,64 [Oh give 

DB 81, S3, 9i, 60, 60, 60 

DB 60,60,33,81,81,81,83,81,72 

DB 108,108, ai,f2,i4 {where' 

DB 81,83,96,60,60,60 

DB 60,60,64|7Z,81,83,B1,72.B1 

DB 33,60,64,72,64 (Home, home 

DB 72,81.ai:ei,81.83,81,72 

DB 106, 108, Si, 72, 64 where 

DB 81,83,96,60,60,60 

DB 60,60,64,72.81,83.81,72,81 

DURAT2 DB ' 

DB 16,16,16,16,32 
DB 8,8,24,81 16:32 
DB 8,8,24,8,16,16,16.16,64 
DB 16,16,16,16,32 
DB a.h,2k,B, 16 32 
DB 8,8'24'8;i6!24,8, 16,64 
DB 4S,24,e, 16, 4b 
DB 16,24,8,16,16,16,16,64 
DB 16! 16, 14, 14,32 
DB 8,8.24,8.16:32 
DB 8.8 24,8,16:16,16,16,128 

PICOFF DB 0,0[0,i,ft,^i0,t30,^4A 
DB 0,^S0,»60,^70,0,*a0 
DB »90,0 

TCOLOR DB •70, ^30 (player colors 

THORIZ DB •10;^8a (and positions 

« Alternate character aet 

NEW9ET DB 0,S41,^CF,^7F (ammo dump 
DB •F0.^F8.^E0.0 "^ 

DB •IS. •IB, •IB (cactus 
DB •DB,*DF,^D8,«F8,^18 

DB 0,0,^30,^7C,^72 
DB •FE,»FF>1F (rock 

DB 0,0,0,^FF (empty 

DB 0,*FF,0,0 

DB 0,^e0,^80,^FF (1 

DB •80, •FF, •60,0 

DB 0,^A0,^A0,^FF (2 

DB •A0,^FF,^A0, 

DB 0,^AS,^A8,^PF (3 

DB •AS,^FF,*A8,0 

DB 0,^AA,^AA,^FF (4 

DB •AA.^FF.^&A.B 

DB 0,^18,^3C,*ia (a grave 
DB •le,^3C.^7E,^7E 

• Cowboy shape table 

aHAPE DB *00,^28,^7C,»94 t*l 
DB •7C;^38>7C,^BA 
DB •BA,^BA,^79:»2a 
DB •28,^6a,^0C,^00 

DB •00,*14,^3E,^2A t*2 

DB •3E,^1C,^3E,^3D 

DB •3D,*3D>9E>14 

DB •14,^16,^30,^00 

DB •04,^14, •7C,^68 ( 
» DB »74,^3a,«78,^BC 

DB •BA,^B9,^78,^28 
DB •28,»28,^2C,^60 

DB •04,^14. •70.^69 ( 
DB •76,^3C,^78,^B8 
DB •BB,^B8,^78,^2a 
DB •28>28>2C,^60 

DB •04,^14,*7C,^68 ( 
DB •74,^38, »7F,»Ba 
DB *B8,^B8;^78,^28 
DB •2B.^28;^2C,^60 

DB •20,^28,^3E.^16 t 
DB •2E.^1C.^1E.^3D 
DB •SD.^9D.»1E,^14 
DB •14,^14, •34, ^06 

DB •20,^28,^3E.^96 ( 
DB •6E.^3C,^1e!^1D 
DB •1D.^1D;*1E.^14 
DB •14.^14. •34, ^06 

THEMAN DB ^20, ^28, •3E, ^16 ( 

DB •2E;^lC,^Fe,^lD 

DB •1D,»1D •1E,^14 

DB ^14, •14,^34, 406 

DB •04,^14,^7C,^68 ( 
DB •74,^38, •7E,*BA 
DB •BA,^BA,^7A,^28 
DB •28,^2S,^2C,^60 

DB •20,«2a,^7E,^36 ( 
DB •6E,^SC,^7e,^lD 
DB *1D,^ID.*1E.^14 
DB •I 4, •I 4, •34; •06 

DB 0,0,0,0,0,0,0.0,0,0 (DEAD 
DB •10.^3B,^BB,^FF,0,0 

DB •00,^14,*3E,»2A ( NQMOVE 
DB •3E,*1C,^3E,^3D 
DB •3D,^SD,^SD,^14 

DB •t4;*i4;^36;^00 

* The dlaplay Hat is 12 graphic 2's 

DLIST DB •70,^70, •70 
DB ^47 
DW DI8P 

DB 7,7,7,7,7,7,7,7,7,7,7 
DB •41 
DW DLIST 

(and that' a all aha wrote! 

END INIT 



PAGE 80 • 




.. ANALOG COMPUTJNq 




16K Cassette or 24K Disk 



by F. Neil Simms 



Cascade is a two-person game of strategy and quick 
reflexes, where the object is to whisk away twenty 
spheres before your opponent does. 
Getting started. 

Plug one pair of paddles into joystick port 1. Then 
RUN the program. Press one of the fire buttons to 
begin, after the title screen is displayed. 

Your screen will be filled with angles, angles with- 
in squares, and squares within square characters. A 
clock will start to count down, and player 1 will be 
able to use the paddle to move a cursor and sphere 
back and forth across the top of the screen. When 
player 1 presses the fire button, or if time runs out, 
the sphere will drop, and that player's score will de- 
crease by one. 

If a sphere strikes an angle character, it will bounce 
to the left or right, then keep on dropping. If it en- 
counters a square within a square (a "black hole"), 
the sphere will be swallowed up. If it lands on an an- 
gle within a square, the descent is stopped, and the 
sphere will change from red to blue. 

Thus, the object is to decrease your score by either 
dropping the sphere into an angle within a square, 
or into a black hole. If a sphere makes it all the way 



to the other end of the screen, then the opposing 
player must "catch" it with their cursor. If they do, 
a point is added back onto the "dropping" player's 
score. But, if the opponent misses, a point is added 
to their score. 

Play then switches to this player (player 2), whose 
sphere drops up from the bottom of the screen in a 
similar manner, and so on. . .back and forth until 
someone's score reaches zero, and a winner (or a dead- 
lock) is declared. Press one of the fire buttons at this 
point to play another game. 

Caution. 

One further complication can occur. When a de- 
scending sphere moves onto a square occupied by a 
stationary blue one, the computer records this coor- 
dinate. When the original sphere has reached its des- 
tination, any such accumulated spheres will drop, the 
latest struck being the first to fall. 

The opponent must also catch any of these cascad- 
ing spheres which make it through, or their score will 
increase, as mentioned before. Note that, if any one 
of these spheres falls into a black hole, the Cascade 
will stop, and the turn will end. D 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 81 



Table 1. 



Line(s) Function 

100 Go initialize, then to main loop. 

150 Determine which "squashed" character to 

print. 
200-210 Busy wait using system timer. 

250 Update plot of previous character. 

260 Plot current character and reset previous X 

and Y. 
300 Print score. 

400-440 Push coordinates of "hit" sphere onto stack 

(if not already there). 
500-510 Plot reverse angle "square" character. 

1000-1050 Beginning of main loop— reserve variables. 
1060-1120 Move sphere back and forth with paddle 

until fire pressed or time up. 
1200 Prepare to drop sphere. 

1230-1245 Get coordinate of character below sphere. 
1250 Check for end of drop. 

1260-1320 Drop sphere one row— deflecting, halting or 

swallowing sphere as appropriate. 
1330-1380 Collision with another sphere— process 

according to character below sphere, after 

placing coordinates on stack. 
1500 If stack not empty, go drop more hit spheres. 

1520 Ensure player 2 gets last drop. 

1525-1535 Check for game over — determine winner 

if so. 
1540 End of main loop. 

1600-1650 Pop coordinates of hit sphere off stack and 

go perform from this point. 
2000-2140 Did opponent catch sphere? 
2500-2550 End of game. 
3000-3020 Black hole animation. 
4000-4160 Draw playfield. 
5000-5500 Initialize— player/missile graphics, 

VBI routine, custom characters. 
6000-6050 Print title screen. 



Table 2. 





Program Variables 


A 


Temp for READs. 


BALLSO 


Score for each player. 


CHAR 


ATASCII value of character at X,Y. 


CHBASE 


New character set page number. 


CLEAR 


Flag— blank out previous square if set. 


COPY$ 


Machine language routine to clear 256 bytes. 


DIR 


Direction of drop (-1/1). 


HIT 


Flag— set if sphere caught. 


1 


General purpose counter. 


LIMIT 


Row number where catch is to be made. 


MESS 


Game over message. 


OBJ 


Indicates left or right angle (0/^) character. 


P 


Paddle reading. 


P2,P3 


Player addresses for player/missile graphics. 


PLR 


Human player (0/1). 


PMBASE 


Player/missile base address. 


PREV 


Previous character COLOR value. 


PX,PY 


Coordinates of previous character 


RAMTOP 


Page number of top of RAM. 


SQ 


Indicates which "squashed" character is to 




replace angle character during animation. 


STACKS 


Stack of coordinates for hit spheres. 


TIME 


Time before drop. 


TOP 


Top of stack. 


VBONOFF 


POKE this address with 1 to turn on VBI 




routine. 


VBSET 


Machine language routine to initialize VBI 




routine. 


WINNER 


1 = PLYR-1, 2 = PLYR-2, 3 = deadlocked. 


X,Y 


Coordinates of current character. 




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PAGE 82 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



BASIC listing. 



10 REH KKMMKICKKKICKICICKICKKMKKKICXKKKKK 

29 REH * CASCADE b*^ F. Neil 5iHHS « 

30 REH * ANALOG COHPUTING « 
40 REH KMICmtMMMlCJKKlllCKlClClClCMlCKlClCKlCMMM 

100 G05UB 5000: GOTO 1000 
150 5Q=0BJ+2*CDIR=-13 :HETURN 
200 IF PEEKC540)<>e THEN 200 
210 RETURN 

250 COLOR PREV:PLOT PH,PY:RETURN 
260 PLOT X,Y:PX=K:PV=Y:RETURN 
300 POSITION 2,PLR»23:? ttejBALLS CPLR) ; 
" " ' : RETURN 
400 'if T0P=0 then 440 

410 FOR 1=1 TO TOP-1 STEP 2:IF STACKSC 
I,I)<>CHR$CX} THEN 430 

420 IF STACKS CI+1,I+1}=:CHRSCV} THEN PO 
P : RETURN 
430 NEXT I 

440 T0P=T0P*1 : STACKS CTOP, TOP> =CHRS <XJ : 
T0P=T0P+1 : STACKS CTOP , TOP} =CHRS CYJ ! RETU 
RN 

500 COLOR 3+<CHAR=3J :PLOT X,Y 
510 FOR 1=10 TO STEP -1:S0UND 0,180, 
2,I:P0KE 540,2:G0SU6 2Q0:NEXT I:RETURN 
1000 PLR= NOT PLR:T0P=0:TIME=10:X=5:PX 
=X:Y=2+19»PLR:PY=Y:LIHIT=l+21«f NOT PL 
R) : DIR=1-2»PLR : PREy=32 : CLEAR=:0 
1020 POSITION 16,PLR»23:? tte;TIHE; 
1050 POKE 540,10:G0SUB 200:P0KE 542,60 
.■GOTO 1080 

1860 IF NOT PTRIGCPLR) THEN POKE 77,0 
'.GOTO 1200 

1070 IF PEEKC542}=0 THEN POKE 542,60:1 
IHE=TIHE-1: POSITION 16,PLR»23:? tt6;TIH 
EJ" ■';:IF TIHE=0 THEN 1280 
1088 P=228-PADDLECPLRJ:IF P<48 THEN P= 
48 

1850 IF P>191 THEN P=191 
1188 X=INTIP/8J-5 
1118 IF X=PX THEN 1060 

1120 SOUND e,30+X+X,10,8:C0L0R 32:PL0T 
PX,PY:PX=X:C0L0R 134:PL0T X,Y:SOUND 
,8,8,8:G0T0 1060 

1200 BALLS (PLR]=BALLSCPLR)-l:GOSUB 388 
:P0SITI0N 16,PLR»23:? »6;" ";:POKE 53 
278,0 

1230 POKE 54e,2:S0UND o,iee+x+x,io,8:s 
OUND 1,158+Y*Y,18,8 
1248 Y=Y+DIR 

1245 GOSUB 288:S0UND 0,e,0,0:SOUND 1,0 
.0,0 

1250 IF Y=LIMIT then COLOR 32: PLOT PX, 
PY:HIT=PEEKf53254+t NOT PLR3}:G0T0 288 
8 

1268 LOCATE X, Y,CHAR :G0SUB 25e:P0KE 53 
278,0 

1265 IF CHAR=32 THEN COLOR 134: GOSUB 2 
60:PREU=CHAR:G0T0 1230 

1270 IF NOT CCHAR=161 OR CHAR=162} TH 
EN 1288 

1275 PREV=CHAR:LET 0BJ=CHAR-161: GOSUB 
150: COLOR 169+SO: GOSUB 268 
1277 LET X=X-DIR«(CHAR=iei)+DIRKCCHAR= 
162): GOTO 1268 

1288 IF CHAR<=4 THEN COLOR 166: PLOT PX 
,PV: GOSUB 500: GOTO 1508 

1290 IF CHAR033 AND CHAR034 THEN 132 


1295 SOUND 0,20,10,8 

1300 PREV=33* f CHAR=33J : OB J=CHAR-33 : GOS 
UB 150:C0L0R 41+SQ:G0SUB 260 :X=X-DIR»C 
CHAR=33] 4DIR« CCHAR=34} 
1310 SOUND 8,8,8,8:G0T0 1260 
1320 IF CHAR=165 THEN GOSUB 3000: GOTO 
1528 

1338 GOSUB 400 

1335 COLOR 134 :PREU=166: GOSUB 268 
1348 Y=Y+DIR: LOCATE X,Y,CHAR:IF CHAR=3 
3 OR CHAR=34 OR CHAR=166 THEN 1260 
1350 IF CHAR=32 THEN COLOR 134: PLOT PX 
, PV : PREM=166-134»CLEAR : CLEAR=8 : GOTO 12 
60 

1360 IF CHAR=ie5 THEN GOSUB 250: GOSUB 
3000: GOTO 1520 



1370 GOSUB 250 :0BJ=CHAR-3: GOSUB 150: CO 

LOR 137+SQ:PREg=3+tCHAR=3) : GOSUB 260 

1380 X=X-DIR»CCHAR=3]+DIR«(CHAR=4) :G0T 

8 1268 

1588 IF TOPOO then 1688 

1528 IF NOT PLR THEN 1000 

1525 IF BALLS CO) =0 THEN HINNER=:1 

1530 IF BALLS CI) =0 THEN HINNER=MINNER+ 

2 

1535 IF MINNER THEN 2500 

1540 GOTO 1000 

1600 Y=ASCCSTACKS CTOP, TOP)) :T0P=T0P-1: 

X=ASC CSTACKS CTOP , TOP) ) : T0P=T0P-1 : PX=X : 

PY=Y:COLOR 32:PL0T PX,PY 

1650 HIT=0:CLEAR=l:GOTO 1340 

2000 IF HIT<8 THEN 2100 

2010 FOR 1=0 TO 14: SOUND 8,1*10+48,2,1 

:C0L0R IHTCI/5)+134:PL0T PX,PY:HEXT I: 

SOUND 0,0,e,8:G0SUB 250 

2028 BALLS CPLR)=BALLSCPLR)+l: GOSUB 300 

2030 GOTO 1508 

2168 COLOR 32:PL0T PX,PY 

2110 FOR 1=14 TO STEP -1: SOUND 0,I»1 

8+48,18,I:NEXT I : SOUND 0,8,0,0 

2120 PLR= NOT PLR:BALLS CPLR)=BALLSCPLR 

)+l: GOSUB 30e:PLR= NOT PLR 

2140 GOTO 1500 

2500 IF HINNER<3 THEN MESSC23,2S)=CHRS 

C48+HINNER) :GOTO 2538 

2528 HESSC21,35)="&«{[BEEIl!HaaD&« " 
2538 FOR 1=1 TO 61:P0SITI0N 0,11:? tt6; 
MESSCI,I+19); :POKE 540,2:S0UND 0,80,2, 
4:GDSUB 200:S0UND 0,0,0,0:POKE 548,5 
2548 GOSUB 208: IF PTRIGC8) AND PTRIGCl 
) THEN NEXT I:GOTO 2530 
2550 POP : GOSUB 5400: GOTO 1000 
3088 TOP=0: GOSUB 250 

3010 FOR 1=134 TO 136:C0L0R I:PLOT X,Y 
:SOUND 0, C139-I)»40,2,10:P0KE 540,5:G0 
SUB 200:NEXT I:SOUND 0,0,0,0 
3028 COLOR 165:PL0T X,Y:RETURN 
4000 COLOR 161:PL0T 0,2:PL0T 19,21:C0L 
OR 162:PL0T 19,2:PL0T 0,21 
4020 FOR Y=4 TO 19:X=-1 
4040 X=X+INT tPEEK tRAND0H)«6/256) +2 : IF 
X>18 THEN 4090 

4060 COLOR INTCPEEKCRAND0H)«2/256)+3+3 
e^CPEEK CRANDOH) <198) 
4888 PLOT X,Y:GOTO 4040 
4090 NEXT Y:FOR 1=3 TO 13 STEP 5 
4100 X=I4INTCPEEKCRAND0H)H5/256} : COLOR 
165: PLOT X,ll+INTCPEEKCRAND0H)iK2/256) 
:POSITION X-1,6:? 1*6;" "JCHRSC3);" " 
4160 POSITION X-1,17:? 116;" ";CHRSC4); 
" ":NEXT I: RETURN 

5888 DIH STACKSCISB), BALLS CI), C0PYSC35 
) , CLEARS C16) , UBSETS Cll) , HESS C81) 
5001 RAHT0P=PEEKC106) :POKE 106,RAHT0P- 
8 

5882 PHBASE=RAHT0P-8 : CHBASE=RAHT0P-4 : P 
2= CPHBASE+6)»256 : P3=P2+256 
5003 GRAPHICS 1+16: GOSUB 6888 
5885 FOR 1=1 TO 16: READ A : CLEARS CI)=CH 
RSCA) :NEXT I 

5010 DATA 104,104,133,213,184,133,212, 
169,8,168 

5815 DATA 145,212,200,208,251,96 
5858 FOR 1=1 TO 35: READ A:COPYSCI)=CHR 
SCA) :NEXT I 

5852 DATA 104,104,133,213,104,133,212, 
133,214,169 

5854 DATA 224,133,215,169,4,133,216,16 
8,8,177 

5856 DATA 214,145,212,280,288,249,238, 
215,238,213 

5858 DATA 198,216,288,241,96 
5060 FOR 1=1536 TO 1573: READ A: POKE I, 
A: NEXT I 

5065 DATA 0,216,173,0,6,248,28,162,1,1 
69 

5066 DATA 232,56,253,112,2,201,52,176, 
4,169 

5067 DATA 52,208,6,201,196,144,2,169,1 
95,157 

5068 DATA 2,208,202,16,230,76,98,228 
5878 FOR 1=1 TO 11 : READ A : VBSETS CI)=CH 
RSCA) :NEXT I 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 83 



5975 DATA 104,162,6,160,1,169,7,32,92, 

228,96 

5080 ><=USR(ADR(gB5ET$)} :REH Initiate g 

BI routine 

5090 yB0N0FF=1536:RAHD0M=53770 

5160 X=USR (ADR (COPVS) , CHBA5E»256) 

5170 POKE 756,CHBfl5E 

5180 FOR I=CHBA5E«256+8 TO CHBft5E»256* 

ie3:READ A:P0KE I,A:NEXT I 

5185 DATA 0,6,14,28,56,112,96,0 

5190 DATA 0,96,112,56,28,14,6,0 

5195 DATA 255,135,143,157,185,241,225, 

255 

5200 DATA 255,225,241,185,157,143,135, 

255 

5205 DATA 255,129,189,165,165,189,129, 

255 

5210 DATA 0,24,60,66,126,66,60,24 

5215 DATA 0,0,24,36,60,36,24,0 

5220 DATA 0,0,0,0,24,24,0,0 

5230 DATA 28,46,110,124,56,112,96,0 

5240 DATA 56,116,118,62,28,14,6,0 

5250 DATA 0,6,14,28,62,118,116,56 

5260 DATA 0,96,112,56,124,110,46,28 

5300 FOR 1=53248 TO 53251: POKE 1,0: NEK 

T I 

5320 POKE 559,58:P0KE 706,88:P0KE 707, 

250 

5340 FOR I=P2 TO P3 STEP 256 :X=USR (ADR 

(CLEARS) ,1} : NEXT I: REM Clear 2 pages 

5360 POKE 54279, PMBASE: POKE 53277,2 

5380 FOR 1=0 TO 5:READ A : POKE P2+51-I, 

AiPOKE P3+205+I,A:NEXT I 

5390 DATA 195,231,189,153,255,255 

5395 IF PTRIG(e) AND PTRIG(l) THEN 539 

5 

5400 SETCOLOR 0, 6,8 : SETCOLOR 1,12,8:5E 

TCOLOR 2,8,6:? tt6;CHRS(125) 

5410 POSITION 7,0: ? «6; ■■fHPn-Q" : POSIT! 

ON 7,23:? tl6;"raaSH-0"; 

5420 BALLS (0) =20 : BALLS (1) =20 : WINNER=0 

5430 PLR=0:GDSUB 300 : PLR=1 : GOSUB 300 

5440 MES5=" " ; MES $ (8U = MES S ; ME SS ( 2? =ME 

s s : ME S S (21 . 61) ="ffl!iFPna CHGE* aa^B 



fireBTO PLAY AGAIN 



5450 GOSUB 40e0:P0KE UB0N0FF,1 

5500 RETURN 

6000 ? tt6; CHRS (125) : SETCOLOR 0,0,0:SET 

COLOR 1,7,8:SETC0L0R 2, 0, : POSITION 6, 

9:? tt6;"CaScAdE" 

6010 POSITI ON 8,12;? tl6; "bU" : POSITION 

3,14:? 116 j-aMBBBKBCGE": POSITION o,i 

9:? «6 ; "press FIRE to beg i n" ; 

6020 FOR 1=0 TO 10: POKE 540,4 

6025 SOUND 0,1*10+50,2,1 

6030 SETCOLOR O, 4,1 : SETCOLOR 2,12,I:G0 

SUB 200 

6040 NEXT I:SOUND 0,0,0,0 

6050 RETURN 



CHECKSUM DATA. 

(see page 24) 

10 DATA 335,809,121,341,66,797,583,586 

,810,554,423,845,682,274,743,7969 

440 DATA 837,775,382,245,537,735,42,39 

1,231,908,67,982,777,10,893,7812 

1240 DATA 760,60,808,778,780,287,551,7 

69,335,781,341,357,606,114,732,8059 

1335 DATA 350,256,214,555,405,454,12,1 

24,97,233,143,715,695,902,702,5857 

2010 DATA 531,874,706,276,77,833,710,2 

35 , 208 , 665 , 12 , 846 , 545 , 608 ,364,7490 

4000 DATA 13,905,641,335,4,952,892,590 

,580,197,619,598,225,915,459,7925 

5050 DATA 528,358,839,382,342,63,476,7 

83,677,990,266,662,490,966,300,8122 

5170 DATA 556,395,612,621,386,366,424, 

678 , 296 , 3 , 750 , 685 , 642, 774 , 998 , 8186 

5320 DATA 791,17,280,749,698,879,940,5 

47,894,717,49,5,802,276,469,8113 

6020 DATA 564,901,845,394,794,3498 



Assembly listing. 



U3R FUNCTION TO CLEBR 
254 BYTES OF RAM 

X=»USR (rout i no addr . page addr) 

WHERE page addr IS THE ADDRESS 
OF THE ARE« TO BE CLEARED. 

Zara page vector 

»- »D4 



»" » + Z 

•"- tetee 

PLA 
PLA 



! rel acatabl m 
? 1 gnl r« count 
■ -■■ I get h 1 vector 

STA VECTOR+l !put In vector 
PLA ilo byte too 

STA VECTOR 
LDA »I9 
TAY 



»CI«ar Qn« page 



CLRLP 



STA (VECTOR) . Y 

INY 

BNE CLRLP 



tback. to BASIC 



IBASIC U3R routine to copy 

I ROM character set to 

I "base addreas" in RAM. 

) Code fs relocatable, to be 

I placed in a BASIC strlno. 

I 

iCall via: 

I 

i X«USR (routine address, ba«e address) 

I 

IZaro page vectors 

»- »D4 



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PAGE 84 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



NEUBAa *- »*2 
0LDBA3 •■ »*2 

Zara pag« vjir * ■ 
PftBES »" »+l 

Equatam 
ROMSET - •£<! 

3t«rt of routine 

START 

PLA 

PLA 

STA NEUBAa+l 

PLA 

3TA NEUBAS 

STA DLDBA3 



LDA »ROMSET 
STA 0LDBA3+t 



I 1st page of ROM «st 



} 1 gnoro count 

Ihl byte of nsM base 

tand lo byte 

lA must equal zero, 

to clear OLDBAS (lo) 

lhi byte of ROM set addr 
Iput in vector 



LDA *4 

STA PASES 

LDY »a 

LDA <OLDBAS) 

STA (NENBAB) 
I NY 

BNE LOOP 

INC OLDBAS-l-l 

JNC NEWBA9+1 

DEC PA8ES 

BNE LOOP 

RTS 



Icopy 4 pages 



,Y I Set ROM byte 
,Y latore In RAM 

IPage at a tine 

I INC hi (next page) 
tNeM base vector too 

fA pages copied? 

iLoop If not 

lElse return to BASIC 



iVertlcal Blank Routine 

) to control PI ayer/Ml ssl le 

f )iarlzontal pasLtions by 

) reading paddle ports. 

I 

■Initiate by first calling 

I veSET routine to steal vector. 



i Turn off 

I 1S36 with or 



I Equates 



nd on by pot<lng 
" — 1 respectively 



locat ion 



HP0aP2 
PADDLB 
XITVBL 
I 



ONOFF 
I 

START 



SD002 
• S0270 
> »e462 

»• «0&0e 

.BYTE 



CLD 

LDA ONOFF 

BEQ SOVBI 

LDX »2-l 



jensure binary arlth. 
Iroutlne on? 
Isklp If not 

(Read paddles and 1 



LOA *232 
3EC 



I3ubtract from 232 
f BO Clockwise turn li 
SBC PADDLfl.X la "right" turn 
CMP #32 <Left ir«ilt reached? 
BC3 3KIP1 IBranch If not 
LDA •32 ;Use left limit 
BNE SETHP08 



CMP •19& iRlght limit reached? 
8CC SETHPOa IBranch if not 



LDA #193 



(Use right limit 



I USR routine to steal VBI vector 
I tar setting Up RICVB routine. 

t Equates 

I 

3ETVBV - »E43C 

MYVBR - S0601 



«800e 



I rel ocatabl e 



STA HPDSP2, 

DEX 

BPL LOOP 



X iSet horlz. pos. of plyr. 
I Do for each player 



JMP XITVBL iLet OS do its VBI chores 



PLA 

LDX •MYVBR/234 

LDY »MYVBR«.»FF 

LDA #7 

JSR SETVBV I sat 

RTS 



the VBLANK! 



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LOGO4AIDE 




by 



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REPHODUCEABLE 
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PARENTSI STUDENTSI USERS GROUPS! 

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Homeword(D) $46 

Ultima 11(D) $39 

Dark Crystal (D) $26 

Wiz. & Princess (D) ... $22 

Lunar Leeper (D) $20 

Wiz & Princess (D) ...$22 

Frogger(C/D) $23 

SIRIUS 

Bandits (D) $23 

Space Eggs (D) $20 

Sneakers (D) $20 

Way Out (D) $27 



crypts o Terror' " Type Attack (D) $27 

orypts oil error Repton (D) $27 

(U) $23 (C) $2U Critical Mass (D) $27 



INNOVATIVE DESIGN 

Speedway Blast 

(D)$20(R)$27 

Pool 400 (R) $27 

JV SOFTWARE 

Jrny to Pints (C/D) $20 

Action Quest (C/D) ... $20 
Ghost Encount. (C/D) .$20 

INFOCOM 

ZorkI, Nor III (D) $27 

Deadline (D) $34 

Starcross(D) $27 

Suspended (D) $34 

Witness (D) $34 

Planetfall(D) $34 

Enchanter (D) $34 

Infidel (D) $34 

KRELLSAT Call 

INTELL. STATEMENTS 
Prof. Blackjack (D) ... $46 
LJK 

Letter Perfect (0) $74 

Data Perfect (D) $74 

Spell Perfect (D) $56 

Letter Perfect (R) $74 

MICROPROSE 

Solo Flight (D) $26 

Hellcat Ace (C/D) $23 

MONARCH 

ABCCompiler(D) $55 

OPTIMIZED SYSTEMS 

Action (R) $65 

Basic XL (R) $65 

Mac 65(D) $58 

C-65(D) $58 

Bug 65 (D) $23 

ODESTA 

Chess (D) $46 

Checkers (D) $34 

Odin(D) $34 

PARKER BROS 

Astrochase(R) $33 

Death Star(R) $33 

Q-Bert(R) $33 

Popeye (R) $33 

PHOENIX 

Birth of Phoenix (D) .. $16 

Adv. In Time (D) $20 

QUALITY 

Name That Song D'M'"A',i^.;.t^r rri\ 

rn>«iQ</-i«ii P.M. Animator(D) 



(D)$13(C)$11 
Return of Hercules (D) $22 

All Baba(D) $22 

Jeeper Creepers (D) . . $20 
ROKLAN 

Gorf (D) $27 (R) $30 

DIx Invaders (D)$23(R)$27 



Fast Eddy (R) $23 

SPINNAKER 

Snooper Troop 1.2(D) . $30 
Most Amazing (D) .... $27 

Kids on Keys(D) $20 

Trains (D) $27 

Delta Drawing (R) .... $27 

Aerobics (D) $34 

Hey Diddle Diddle (D) . $20 
Srch AmzngThngs(D) $27 

Story Machine (D) $23 

Face Maker (D) $23 

STRATEGIC SIM. 

Broadsides (D) $27 

Carrier Force (D) $39 

Combat Leader (D) . . . $27 

Rails West (D) $27 

Epidemic (D) $23 

Eagles (D) $27 

Cosmic Bal I or 11(D) . . $27 

SUBLOGIC 

Flight Simulator 11(D) . $36 

Pinball(C/0) $20 

SWIFTY 

J. White Music Lessons 

(C/D) $20 

SYNAPSE 

File Manager (R) $54 

Fort Apocalypse (C/D) $23 
Dimension X (C/D) ... $23 

Blue Max (C/D) $23 

Encounter (D/R) $23 

Zepplin(C/D) $23 

Pharoah's Curse (C/D) $23 
Protector II (D)$23(R)$29 
Shamus . . . (D)$23(R)$29 
Fort Apocalypse (C/D) $23 

Shamus II (C/D) $23 

Necromancer (C/D) . . . $23 
Pharoh's Curse (C/D) .$23 

Drelbs (C/D) $23 

Shadow World (C/D) ..$23 

Survivor (C/D) $23 

THORN EMI 

Soccer (R) $34 

Jumbo Jet (R) $34 

Submarine Comm. (R) $34 
TRONIX 

S.A.M.(D) $39 

$29 

Juice (C/D) $20 

Chatterbee(D) $27 



3-DSprgrphcs(C/D) 
Survival Adv. (C/D) 



. . $27 
. . $17 



CIRCLE #135 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



PAGE 86 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 




Cabin 
Fever Fantasies 



by Steve Panak 



Here we are again, in the heart of winter. The rus- 
tic atmosphere of snow-covered houses, smoke curUng 
from brick chimneys, and the prospects of a great new 
year fail to quench my desire for the warm sun. West- 
erners and Southerners don't know how nice they 
have it, but battling waist-high snow to get to school 
makes me appreciate warm weather. Still, as my liv- 
ing room windows go static white with snow, I think, 
"What better time to curl up with a good game in 
my Atari?" 

SPELUNKER 

by MicroGraphiclmage and Tim Martin 

BRODERBUND 

17 Paul Drive 

San Rafael, CA 94903 

48K Disk $34.95 

I don't know if I'm normal (and the professionals 
are still out on that issue, as well), but I've always 
wanted to explore caves. Stories of Huck Finn, Tom 
and Becky lost in those country caverns lured me out 
in search of depths to claim as my own. 

Alas, the closest I've yet come were the small caves 
in the nearby national forest and guided tours through 
some of Virginia's caverns. I could only pretend to 



be the first one to see and explore these new worlds. 
Worn paths, graffiti and litter brought me back to 
reality— quickly. Another unfulfilled dream. 

Spelunker, by Broderbund, comes a little too late 
for my first childhood, but that doesn't prevent it from 
rekindling those old dreams. Spelunker combines all 
of the arts of cave exploring with arcade-quality graph- 
ics and fast action — all from the safety of your favorite 
chair, sans the dangers of cave-ins, bottomless pits and 
vampire bats. 

Spelunking, for the uninformed, is the technical 
term for cave exploring. As Spelunker, you are given 
an impressive network of caverns to explore and plun- 
der. The object of the game is to move throughout 
the caves, gathering up treasures and other items nec- 
essary to survive. 

At the start of play, you descend via elevator and 
must decide on which level to exit. This is of para- 
mount importance, as only a portion of any level is 
visible at a time; the remainder scrolls into view only 
as you move along its paths. 

This is an adequate simulation of a maze, and while 
it's unlikely that you will truly get lost, it is highly 
likely that it will take you a while to find the opti- 
mum route to the key or power module you need. 

You see, you must have those keys to gain access 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 87 



to locked portions of your new world. And power mod- 
ules? Well, they only keep you alive. Throughout Spe- 
lunker, your power level is constantly decreasing and 
must be continually replenished to keep functioning. 

Strategy is required here, as the power modules re- 
turn you to full energy — but no more. It is, therefore, 
advantageous to wait as long as possible to pick up 
a module. More than a few times, I fizzled out with 
the module just at my fingertips. But loss of power 
isn't the only frustration. 

Numerous Spelunkers of days gone by haunt the 
caves, hoping to sell you a one-way ticket to their 
realm. However, you do have a phantom blaster to 
bust these ghosts. Stand firm and fire to eradicate the 
spirit, but avoid overuse, as the weapon consumes your 
power rapidly. 

Vampire bats also torment you by dropping some- 
thing (I'm not quite sure what) on you from above. 
These bats prefer the dark and can be neutralized with 
a flare, if you happen to have one. Other dangers in- 
clude dizzying heights, tight squeezes, volcano pits and 
deadly gases. 




Spelunker. 

If you find yourself against an immobile obstacle 
(like a solid rock wall), you'd better hope that you 
remembered to pick up some dynamite. Jab at the D 
key, then run — fast! If you place it properly, the ex- 
plosive will blow anything off the screen. If you move 
too slowly, it will blow you off the screen. 

The keyboard launches flares, ignites dynamite and 
blasts ghosts, while the joystick controls up, down, 
left and right movement, with the button jumping 
your character over obstacles and from place to place. 
If this sounds familar to the Donkey Kong player, the 
similarity is unmistakable; this is definitely a Donkey 
Kong derivative. But that doesn't stop it from being 
a truly good game. 

For, while Spelunker is a rehash of familiar game 
themes, it does add some twists and turns which def- 
initely make it worth the money. Controls are very 
responsive, and they never feel sluggish. Graphics, as 



well, are of the highest quality; quite colorful and de- 
tailed, these push your computer and monitor to their 
limits. 

The variety of scenes is incredible. There are lad- 
ders, ropes, elevators, mine cars and more, each pro- 
viding its own particular risk. The display also tallies 
your dynamite, flares and keys, so you always know 
exactly where you stand. Spelunker's difficulty level 
is high, and should be challenging for a while — but, 
more importantly, its variety provides incentive to 
continue. 

Free lives are liberally provided, although you'll al- 
ways need one more. And the manual, while not a 
Pulitzer Prize contender, tells most of what you need 
to know about Spelunker. 

It may be nitpicking, but two things did really bother 
me. The game is reloaded after each play, a lengthy 
and wasteful procedure. While other levels are loaded 
from the disk as you need them, the post-game reload- 
ing takes place regardless of whether additional caverns 
have been added. Also, only one player may explore 
the underground world at a time. 

Overall, though, Spelunker is an excellent game 
and cannot be too enthusiastically recommended. 

CUTTHROATS 

by Michael Berlyn and Jerry Wolper 

INFOCOM 

55 Wheeler Street 

Cambridge, MA 02138 

48K Disl< $34.95 

Cutthroats follows Infidel as Infocom's second in- 
stallment in Tales of Adventure series. True-to-life 
dangers and rewards are the cornerstones of this series. 
You'll find no magic — nor little elves — to aid you. 

There's sunken treasure out there somewhere, and 
you must dive for it . . . not only because you want it, 
but also because you're forced to. It seems that you've 
fallen in with the wrong crowd. You have the money, 
maps and diving skills that they need to recover a 
treasure. But any of your "friends" (Johnny Red, the 
Weasel, or Pete the Rat) would just as soon kill you 
if you get in their way. The thought of double-crossing 
them shouldn't even enter your mind. 

Interaction with the characters is necessary to suc- 
ceed, and their unpredictability will keep you on your 
toes for hours. Even more than in most of Infocom's 
games, you must keep your eyes and ears peeled for 
any clues which may reveal the characters' true per- 
sonalities and motives. 

In Cutthroats, you wake up in your hotel room to 
find a note that has been slipped under the door. You 
begin to remember the events of the previous night, 
how your friend Hevlin gave you a map with sunken 
treasure pinpointed. Then Hevlin's luck took a down- 
turn — and he turned up dead. Now Johnny Red, a 
particularly shady fellow, invites you to the Shanty, 
a particularly shady bar, for a little conversation. 



PAGE 88 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



He wants you to take him to the treasure Hevlin 
told him about. It seems that Hevhn had the loose 
lips sailors always worry about. You're also enlisted 
to pay the way and dive for the riches. All Johnny 
wants is the glory and the bucks. 

What's more, lurking in the shadows are those who 
would like to see you lose the treasure — and those 
who would like to see you dead. McGinty, for exam- 
ple, is a nervous and uncooperative little fellow who 
will try to foil any attempts to form a diving party. 

If you survive the journey, the shark attacks and 
the untold other plot complications, you'll end up 
bringing back the treasure (and yourself) intact. 




Cutthroats. 

There are two separate sunken ships with treasure, 
and in any given game, you're not sure which one 
you'll be diving for. Using an enclosed booklet, you 
must piece together clues supplied by Johnny Red, to 
determine which treasure you're after. And, if you're 
wrong. . .well, one doesn't think of such things on 
an empty stomach. 

Infocom has introduced a new packaging design and 
has repackaged all of their games. The new carton 
is similar to a book in size, and the cover opens up 
to show the latest issues of True Tales of Adventure. 
This can be read both for clues and for fun, and it 
also provides the new adventurer with basic game in- 
formation, rules and strategies. When the book is fin- 
ished, pop open the back. Inside the carton is your 
disk, along with the other necessary game materials. 

Infocom has started rating their games by level — 
Junior, Standard, Advanced or Expert. Cutthroats is 
Standard, on the same level as Zork I, the Enchanter, 
Witness and Planetfall. It was a bit too easy for me, 
as I'm somewhere between Advanced and Expert. 
Still, the challenge lasted a few hours, and the diffi- 



culty fof lack thereof) rarely spoils an Infocom exper- 
ience. I must admit that I used a printer this time, 
and being able to reread the text between sessions is 
a great help. 

Infocom games must be reviewed more as books 
than as games. The descriptions are complete and 
vivid, just what you would expect from Infocom, but 
Cutthroats lacks the humor of some earlier offerings. 
I missed it. Nevertheless, the characters are brought 
to life, and this is one of the best compliments that 
could be paid such a game. Overall, Cutthroats is 
not one of Infocom's best games, but is still so far 
above the competition as to make them pale by com- 
parison. 

I just realized that, unlike the arcade games that 
litter the market, there are few copiers of Infocom's 
interactive fiction, few imitators. Can it be done? 
Probably. Can it be done as well as Infocom does it, 
or better? Unlikely. With each new game, Infocom 
is further entrenched in their position as manufac- 
turer of the most unique, highest quality software 
available on the market today. 

GALACTIC ADVENTURES 
by Tom Reamy 

STRATEGIC SIMULATIONS, INC. 
465 Fairchild Drive, Suite 108 
Mountain View, CA 94043 
48K Disl< $59.95 

Galactic Adventures is a very hard game to review. 
The main problem is the finite space I have to tell 
you about an infinitely complex game. You're right; 
I'd better stop rambling and get right into the game. 
I must warn you, though: an entire book could be 
written about this game and still not do it justice. 

Basically, Galactic Adventures takes the usual D&D 
adventure themes and adds a few of its own twists. 
Your objective is to build up your strength until you're 
powerful enough to tackle an adventure — at which 
point, you realize that you were nowhere near ready 
to start, and you must begin the game anew. 

After this has occurred a few times, you'll learn your 
lesson and begin to strengthen your characters enough 
to survive at least the first encounter. Familiar attri- 
butes (speed, intelligence, dexterity, etc.) are used to 
breathe life into the characters you and the computer 
create. 

Throughout the game, you're constantly being given 
choices — where to go, what to do, even what to say. 
This is done with a hierarchy of option levels, nar- 
rowing down to the exact thing you want to do. You 
continue until you relinquish your turn to the ma- 
chine. The program executes your commands, and 
then the machine moves. The readouts indicate if 
you've survived. If you did, they'll tell how well you 
fared. 

Jobs are available, and successfully completing one 
will increase your bankroll. Whether you complete 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 89 



the job or not depends on both your character's skills 
and your own. When a job is offered, its skill require- 
ments are compared with your character's skills, to 
determine the probability of success. You then opt for 
an abstract resolution, or you may play the skill game. 
The abstract randomly determines your success, while 
the skill game is a logic puzzle similar to Mastermind. 
If you're not familiar with Mastermind, wake up! It's 
one of the most popular logic games in the world. 



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3PrrOM5-tIJ MWEMTOfty, {PJBOFILE. C33 YPi»5S 
C;»J rraCK, CJJOIM, COJFFEH, CTJ flCK 

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Galactic Adventures. 

Using the currency of the land, frilbees, you pur- 
chase weapons, armor, spaceships and aid for your 
quest. In the first phase of Galactic Adventures, you 
meet with various fellow creatures and attempt to in- 
crease your wealth, skill and the size of your band. 

When you feel that you're ready, you enter the ad- 
venture phase of play. There are three types of adven- 
tures: Explore, Escape and Agent. In the first two, 
you must find your way out of the battlefield; in the 
latter, you must capture a specific enemy agent. In 
all three types, there are numerous treasures to ob- 
tain and unlimited battles to fight. 

If you're still not satisfied, there is an additional 
program. It allows you to create your own adventure, 
either from scratch or by modifying an already exist- 
ing one. This feature is extremely user friendly, and 
I experienced no problems as it walked me through 
the phases of creation. It looks as though this could 
be used to provide a skeleton for many D&D scenar- 
ios, virtually eliminating dice and paperwork. 

The manual for Galactic Adventures is complete; 
at first glance, its complexity may overwhelm you. 
However, everything is fully described — if you can find 
it — and additional player aids, like charts and grids, 
are included, along with abundant background infor- 
mation. A two-sided disk contains the game on side 
one and the adventure on side two. 

There are some bad points. Combat is hard to get 
used to, as the movement is controlled with the keys 
1-8, which correspond to the eight possible directions 
a joystick can move. Remembering which number 



moves you in which direction is a nearly impossible 
feat. Fortunately, the moves usually depend on strategy 
rather than arcade speed. Also, while the graphics are 
not to be considered state-of-the-art, it must be re- 
membered that this is a simulation, and as such, the 
display is only there to spark your imagination and 
allow you to keep track of play. The real enjoyment 
of a game like this is not on the screen, but in the 
mind. This one isn't for arcade action addicts. 

One thing can be said for certain, though: Galac- 
tic Adventures is an incredibly complex game with 
enough versatility to keep even the experienced ad- 
venturer busy for decades to come, whether saving a 
damsel in distress or rocketing to the stars. 

QUEST OF THE SPACE BEAGLE 

by Scott Lamb 

AVALON HILL MICROCOMPUTER GAMES 

4517 Harford Road 

Baltimore, MD 21214 

48K Disk $35.00 

Avalon Hill games mean many different things to 
many different people. Some of the finest games I've 
ever played were Avalon Hill board games and simu- 
lations. Gettysburg, Squad Leader and others brought 



Soon 

ANALOG 

Computing 

will be 

only 

a phone call 

away. 



PAGE 90 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



me as close to the real thing as I'd ever care to be. 
Likewise, their board games, such as the classic GO, 
are indispensible entries in my game library. 

It would seem only natural that Avalon Hill bring 
their years of experience to the realm of the personal 
computer. A drawback of those early strategy games 
was the need, in order to simulate reality, of perform- 
ing a large number of calculations and comparisons 
to resolve each and every turn. As a result, they were 
hard to learn and tiresome to play — and their com- 
plexity screamed for computer simplification. 

But, somehow, until Quest of the Space Beagle (or 
Beagle), 1 had never played an Avalon Hill microcom- 
puter game. 1 now consider myself to have been lucky; 
it's hard to see an old friend fail — and so miserably. 




Quest of the Space Beagle. 

Beagle is introduced as the second part of an earlier 
Avalon Hill game, Jupiter 1999. This introduction 
states that, while playing 1999 is not necessary for 
you to enjoy Beagle, it is helpful. It seems more likely, 
if 1999 is anything like Beagle, that purchasing the 
sequel would be the farthest thing from your mind. 

In Beagle, you find yourself many light-years from 
mother Earth, and you must find your way back. To 
play (rather than enjoy) this game, you'll need a BA- 
SIC cartridge, a joystick and a translator disk for the 
XL series. And, although your disk drive may object, 
it must be used to load the game. 

Scrolling text provides background information, and 
then you're plunged into a battle to capture an alien 
planet. This sounds far better than it is. Graphics are 
poor; the action, slow and (worst of all) frustrating. 

The manual (which is, by the way, very thorough 
and complete) says that the "task may seem difficult 
at first. . .(but). . .Take your time; it can be done." 
Well, so can the colonization of the moon, but that 
doesn't make me want to sit around and wait for it. 
It simply is not enjoyable, but more like root canal 
work without anesthesia. 

For the few hardy souls (or, more accurately, the 
masochists) who make it past the dreadful first phase, 



two more await you. In the second phase, the Laby- 
rinthes of Kamerra, you must solve problems and find 
the only exit before your oxygen or stamina run out. 
Oxygen decreases constantly, while stamina is reduced 
each time you bump into things. Within the maze, 
there are rations which restore you to full power — 
should you be able to find them. 

In the third and final Exploration phase, having es- 
caped the maze, you must now find the Earth. Using 
your navigational scanner and hyperdrive, you search 
the known and unknown universe for your small home 
planet. The task is just as hopeless as it sounds. 

Beagle's graphics are poor, moving erratically at 
times, and the monitor must be adjusted and dimmed 
to minimize a distracting flicker. This isn't the strategy 
or simulation game one might expect from Avalon 
Hill, but relies heavily on graphics. When they fail, 
so does the game. 

Quest of the Space Beagle can't be recommended. 
It is disappointing, slow and laborious. A few years 
ago it might have been a good game, but we've ad- 
vanced and don't need to step backwards. If Avalon 
Hill can't live up to their previous record, they should 
stay out of computer games; by putting out something 
like this, they can only lose valuable customers who 
trust their name. And I know someone will like it — 
everything has its own market. Just don't say I didn't 
warn you. 

S.S. ACHILLES 

by Simon Goodwin & David IVIuncer 

BEYOND SOFTWARE 

European Software c/o 3R Import and Export 

731 James St., Suite 405, Syracuse, NY 13203 

48K Disk $24.95 

I find it hard to even imagine a game worse than 
this one. No, wait ... I mean it's not pleasant to im- 
agine a game worse than this one. Unfortunately, with 
my demented mind, I can imagine just about anything 
— except, perhaps, why anyone would like this game. 

The S. S. Achilles is a ship you find yourself aboard 
in this dog. Suddenly a red alert sounds, and you learn 
that the ship is being invaded by an enemy growth. 
Every so often a new seed suddenly appears on the 
ship and begins to grow, until the entire craft is in- 
fected. Your duty, rather than simply evacuate and save 
yourself, is to collect up all the relic containers and 
then flee in panic. 

This you do from the safety of your droid, which 
can withstand contact with the growth for limited 
periods of time. What the droid can't withstand, how- 
ever, is loss of power or integrity. Power loss is con- 
stant, while integrity decreases when you contact any 
object. Both can be increased; you collect power mod- 
ules and integrity packs, then return them, along with 
the relic containers, to your escape shuttle. The droid 
can carry only one of each at a time. It's a pretty 
worthless droid. 



ISSUE 28 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



PAGE 91 




S.S. Achilles. 

And so it goes, with you racing around the ship 
(which resembles a huge maze), while the growth 
inches towards you. By using a sealant gun, you can 
seal holes in bulkheads and slow the growth. When 
you've collected all the relics you think you can — or 
taken all your mind can bear — you escape in the emer- 
gency shuttle. You're then given a rating, from a low- 
ly commendation to an Imperial Medal. 



Graphics are poor; I've seen better on the 2600 with 
a two-dollar bargain bin game. The lower part of the 
display shows power and integrity levels, as well as 
what the droid is currently carrying. Also, a timer 
counts down in the lower left display. . . Use it to time 
eggs. 

This is a one-player game. Options allow you to see 
an overall map of the ship, pause the action, and se- 
lect a starting level of play from Inept (for those with 
no computer experience) to Expert (for 11-year-olds). 
Perhaps this just about sums it up for S.S. Achilles: 
while an expert may be an 1-year-old, I'm afraid the 
average 11 -year-old would find the game insulting. 
The manufacturer encloses no address with the game, 
so you can tell he's hiding. And, while 1 know not 
the retail price, I do know precisely what it's worth: 
$2.00. Not coincidentally, that's the price of a blank 
disk. 

Well, that's it for this month . . . I'll just power down 
until next time. D 



The author wishes to thank Perfect Computers of Niks 
and Boardman, Ohio for their assistance in assembling 
this review. 



Field of Fire review 

(continued from page 15) 

the Germans into the town of St. Anne. Some of the 
worst combat is the inch-by- inch type, wresting the 

town of Aachen from the grip of the Waffen SS— 
not an easy task. 




Field of Fire. 

Ardennes dawn. 

This is the big one. All of your experience comes 
into play here, as you relive the dark days of the bat- 



tle for the Ardennes, witnessing the last dying gasp 
of the Wehrmacht in its do-or-die offensive blitzkrieg 
through the snow. 

Your mission is to regroup your demoralized troops 
into an effective fighting force and halt the charge 
of the Panzers at the berg of Dom Buttenbach. You 
gain points and victory status if you stall the advance 
of the tanks and retreat into the protection of the 
town. As the dawn breaks, you hear the rumble of 
the incoming Panzers. What are you going to do about 
it? 

Take ten, Easy! 

All things considered, FF is an excellent simulation 
of tactical infantry combat. Assaults and firefights are 
carried out in an exciting and realistic fashion, and 
you can use your rifle squads to turn a bad situation 
around. 

If I could find any fault with the game, it would 
be in the documentation. The tactical hints offered 
for each game level are the bare-bones minimum, not 
much in the way of help. Terrain keys enclosed in the 
instruction manual are also woefully inadequate. A 
separate map for each conflict would be a big help 
to the wargamer in planning advances, etc. 

Field of Fire is a game that novice and seasoned 
wargamer should enjoy, and it won't get stagnant. Be- 
sides, what scholar of WWII history wouldn't want 
to move out with the Big Red One. . .and into the 
history books? D 



PAGE 92 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ISSUE 28 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



READER 
SERVICE ( 



ADVERTISER 



119 Abby's Discount Software 46 

111 Advanced Interface Devices 28 

108 Allen Macroware 23 

120 American TV 48 

— ANALOG Publishing 2, 51, 58 

117 Astra Systems 38, 39 

133 August Publications 84 

116 Batteries Included 36 

103 C.A.P Software 8 

124 Centurian Enterprises 64 

106 Gomputability 19 

123 Computer Creations 63 

114 Computer Palace/Royal Software 32 

113 Computer Software Center 31 

107 Computer Software Services 20 

135 Cosmic Computers 85 

122 Digital Devices 61 

125 Disk-of-the-Month Club 64 

128 Eastern House 72 

110 Edu-Tax 27 



READER 

SERVICE # 



ADVERTISER 



127 
112 

118 
109 
140 
105 
129 
137 
134 
126 
115 
104 
102 
132 
142 
101 
137 
125 
131 
130 



Gardner Computing 71 

GTA, Inc 30 

Happy Computers 40 

Indus Systems 25 

Jesse Jones 2 

Lotsa Bytes 13 

Lyco Computers 76 

Micca 27 

MPS 84 

New Horizons Software 64 

Okidata IBC 

Senecom 8 

Software City 7 

Southern Software 84 

S.S.I OBC 

SubLOGIC IPC 

Suncom 92 

Unlimited Software 64 

Wedgwood Rental 83 

Xlent Software 81 



This index is an additional service. While every effort is made to provide a complciL' and accurate listing, the pidjlisher cannot be responsible for inadvertent l'itois. 



The Celebration Continues. 

At a new, low price. We're celebrating PQ's 4 star ratings and you're invited to share 

Ifie excitement. 

Info World Magazine said of Party Quiz: "Perhaps the most elegant product comes 
from Suncom. " Match wits with friends (up to 7 of them/, 
or play alone with the first truly sqpial truly 

involving computer entertainment system. ' "^ 

Each package includes 4 controllers and 
2500 questions, expandable to over i 

18,000 with the optional Questiin ' I 
Library -i;;:^ 

Call today (toll-free) j 

1-800-323-8341 to find \ \ 
PQ near you. \ y' 




***■* San Francisco Chronicle 
* * • * Family Computing Magazine 



The Party Quiz Game'_^ 

Hardware & Software Entertainment System forApphTsmSrffommodore 64 & Atari Computers 




rook Dr. Wtiieltng. IL B0090 
1-800-323-8341 (IL 1-312-459SOO0I 



CIRCLE #137 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




The OKIMATE 10 Personal Color 
Printer's got it for $238.* 




The first affordable 
color printer. 

Atari® computer owners, 
meet the one and only. The 
new OKIMATE 10 Personal 
Color Printer. The first per- 
sonal printer that lets you 
print in a rainbow of 36 
dazzling colors. 







Now your Atari personal 
computer has new mean- 
ing. Because OKIMATE 10 
can bring the information 
on your screen to life. Print- 
ing on plain paper In bril- 
liant color For very little 
green. 



Fully equipped for 
reading, writing eind 
'rithmetlc. 

The OKIMATE lO's word 
processing capability deliv- 
ers crisp, clean term papers, 
school reports and home- 
work. At 240 words per 
minute. So now you can 
print an assignment off your 
Atari personal computer in 
minutes, instead of typing it 
in hours. And OKIMATE 10 
lets you highlight words 
headlines, 
paragraphs 
and charts 
with wide, bold 
or fine 
print. 
So you 
and 
your 

information 
really stand out. 

If you use your Atari per- 
sonal computer to keep 
track of mortgage pay- 
ments, tuition payments, 
your checkbook or beat 
Dow Jones to the punch, 
here's good news: the 
OKIMATE 10 gets down to 
business quickly. And 
easily. 

Easy to learn, 
easy to use. 

"Learn-to-Print" software 
comes with OKIMATE 10 to 
show you how to start print- 
ing. And the OKIMATE 10 



Handbook will teach you 
how to get your wildest 
ideas and images down on 
paper. Now you're set. 

OKIMATE 10 makes it 
easy to get color from the 
screen to paper because it 
comes with its own "Color 
Screen Print" program. 

lust plug the OKIMATE 10 
into your Atari personal 
computer with the PLUG 'N 
PRINT 

%- o'fS -' age.* And 

print. It's that 

easy. 



Everything Included. 

For $2 3 8 you get both the 
printer and the PLUG 'N 
PRINT package plus 





everything you need to 
print: black ribbon, color 
ribbon, data cable, PLUG 'N 
PRINT control cartridge, 
"Learn-to-Print" program, 
"Color Screen Print" soft- 
ware package, computer 
paper, and an easy to read 
handbook. 




Mt. Laurel, NJ 08054 
Available at retailers everywhere. 



Atari is a registered trademark of Atari Inc. 
•PLUG N PRINT packages for Atari computers sold separately. 
Atari requires disk drive and 48K memory. 



CIRCLE #115 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Live the Fantasy and the Adventure. 



SSI's complete line of Atari*" games: 

WARGAMES 

BATTLE FOR NORMANDV" ($39.9S) 
THE BATTLE OF SHILOH" ($39.95) 
BREAKTHROUGH IN THE ARDENNES" ($59.9S) 
BROADSIDES'" ($39.95) 
CARRIER FORCE" ($59.95) 
COMBAT LEADER" ($39.95) % 

COMPUTER AMBUSH" ($59.93) '* 

EAGLES" ($39.95) 
FIELD OF FIRE" ($39.95) 
KAMPFGRUPPE"" ($59.95) 

■^ IF THE DESERT" ($39.95) 
OBJECfTl feK URSK" ($39.95) 
OPERATIoTWrRKET-GARDEN" ($39.95) 
REFORGER '88" ($59.9I§' 
TIGERS IN THE SNOW" (: 
WAR IN RUSSIA'" ($79.95) 

EDUCATIONAL ENTERTAINMENT 
RAILS WEST!'" ($39.95) 




^iiil'lii 



SPORTS & GENERAL TOPIC 

COMPUTER BASEBALL" ($39.95) 

COMPUTER QUARTERBACK'" ($39.95) 

FORTRESS" ($34.95) 

QUEEN OF HEARTS'" ($17.48) 

SCIENCE FICTION/ FANTASY 

" THE COSMIC BALANCE" ($39 

COSMIC BALANCE II'" ($39 , 

"" CYTRON MASTERS'" ($19.98) 

EPIDEMIC!" ($34.95) 

i^lUM GALACTUM" ($39.95)'^ 



RED ALLIANCE" ($19.98) 






flOLE-PUYING/ ADVENTURE 

|3 MISSION CRUSH" ($39.95) 

iTIC ADVENTURES" ($59.95) 

:, PHANTASIE'" ($39.95) 

'PUESTRON'" ($49.93) 



STRATEGIC SIMULATIONS INC. PRESENTS A FANTASY ADVENTURE GAME: QUESTRON^ 

ONE OF THE FINEST CHAPTERS IN THE NEVER-ENDING SAGA OFThE BATTLE BETWEEN GOO^^f 
starring YOU as THE HERO • MESRON, THE GOOD WIZARD • MANTOR. THE EVIL SORCEROR 
AND HIS HORDES OF HERO-CRUNCHING MONSTERS • Written and directed by CHARLES DOUGHE^J^^.^ 

QUESTRON is available on 40K disk for | 

Atari® home computers. 



ATARI is a registered trademark of Atari. Inc. 



Q 



THIS GAME RATED POSITIVELY GREAT. 



Ideal for Fantasy Adventurers of all ages. 



STRAXeaiC SIMULATIONS INC 

If there are no convenient stores nearyou, VISAS Mastercard holders 883 Stierlin Road. BIdg. A-200. Mountain View, CA 94043. Please be sure 

can order direct by calling 800-227-1617, ext. 335 (toll free). In Califor- to include $2.00 for shipping and handling. (California residents, add 

nia, call 800-772-3545. ext 335. 7% sales tax.) All our games carry a "M-day satisfaction oryour money 

To order by mail, send your check tO: STRATEGIC SIMULATIONS, INC., back" guarantee, 

WRITE FOR A FREE COLOR CAIALOG OF |W|H|GAMES. 

CIRCLE C142 ON READER SERVICE Cv